100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 05, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

e

Michigan

Daily

NOW.
$2.00

JI

mmomm

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1914.
WILL COLLECT CLOTHING TODAY

PRICE FIVE CE

.0

of

ARE ASKED
CONGESTION

)n Desk,

or of improved gym-
sprang into sudden
vith the publication
tory conditions in
sium. Petitions ap-
ampus yesterday af-
be more widely cir-
e as follows:
Regents of the Uni-

TODAY
"Freshman Spread," to all first-year
women, Barbour gymnasium, 8:00
o'clock.
Oratorical Association play, "A Curi-
ous Mishap," University Hall, 8:15
o'clock.
Membership dance, Michigan Union,
9:00 o'clock.
Chess 'and Checkers club, Michigan
Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Catholic Students' club dance, St.
Thomas hall, 2:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
O. H. L. Wernicke speaks at Michigan
Union, 3:00 o'clock.
James Schermerhorn at the "Y",meet-'
ing, Majestic theater, 6:00 o'clock.
Dr. A. A. Neuman addresses Menorah
society, Newberry hall, 8:00 o'clock.
INITIATION HELD BY ROUND-UP;
DANCE PLANNED FOR DEC. 11
Formal initiation was accorded the
following men at the meeting of
Round-Up, at the Union last night:
W. L. Siebert, '15P; B. Smith, '16D; A.
Lange, '16M; F. W. Allen, '18M; B.
Fellows, '18M; H. Bowcock, '18M; E.
Miller, '14E; J. P. Carritte, '16E; D.
Ellis, '15E; L. E. Hughes, '16E; W. W.
Candler, '15E; W. Cook, '16E; G. Chat-
el, '15E; D. Root, '15; D. Bell, '15L;
F. Richardson, '16; W. B. Jenkins, '16;
J. Wolf, '15L; A. J. Bancroft, '16L; H.
E. Lillie, '15L; M. H. Tuttle, '16.
A dance at the Armory, Friday, De-
cember 11, will be the next event of
the society.

Cast of the Oratorical association play, which presented "A Curious Mishap"
In University Hall last night, and which will repeat the play tonight.

d students of
.gan, miost re-
to taJ e steps
lnasiuin facili-
ilable for stu-
n them, at the
ichig: in Daily,
Men who are
can pus, are
le above plac-
befor the pe-
ed to the uni-
roper form to
r mee ting De-
iterest ed are

FOOTBAL'YEAR TO-
CLOUSE, WITH FEASTI

FINISH PLA9NS FOR
FRESHMAN'LS.PREAD
Traditionary Function Given By Wom-
en of University, Will Be
0eld Tonight

Ann

Arbor Civic Association
Banquet Team Monday
at Armory

Will

ADMISSION PRICE SET AT $1.00 I JUNIORS WILL ACT AS ESCORTS

'LA FOLLETTE WILL
STALK HERE MONDAY

sin Senator Will
Hill Auditorium,
Flying Tour

Appear
on

in

'S

f that their organizations will pass,
solutions to the same effect as the'
titions.
PENDICITIS AGAIN POPULAI%
ur Students SufferinW From Attacks
at University Hospital
Appendicitis has four student vic-
is in the university hospital. Of
s number, two, F. R. Baker, grad,
I R. T. Getty, '16D, were operated
:n yesterday, as their conditions
came suddenly acute. Bakter was
erated upon for a gangrenous ap-
idix, while the cause of Getty's op-
tion was a ruptured appendix. Phy-
lans attending the men say that
.h have a good chance for recovery.
3. B. Lucas, grad, was operated ip-
for appendicitis several days ago,
the hospital. His physicians said
terday that he was improving as
11 as could be expected.
Pred Bolton, '18E, is suffering from
attack of appendicitis at the hospit-
His condition is not thought to be
ious.
LL REHEARSE EVERY NUMBER
F KERMESS PROGRAM TODAY

TICKETS ON SALE AT 25 CENTS
Senator Robert M. LaFollette, of
Wisconsin, who speaks in Hill audito-
rium, Monday night, touches Michigan,
on a flying tour of the middle west and
the south. He is filling a few engage-'
.tents in the short time before Con-
-r:s opens, and nearly all of his
ti'rne will be taken up at universities.
Senator LaFollette holds a record
that is said to mark him as an unusu-
al man. He was admitted to the bar,
but, soon after his graduation from the
university, he entered politics, and has
been in politics since that time. He
was sent to Congress for two sessions.
Later he was elected governor of Wis-
consin, and 'reelected twice. Before
the end of his third term, he resign-
ed to become United States senator,
and was reelected to that position in
1911. In the senate, he identified him-
self with the Insurgents, at which
time he inade his reputation as a fight-
er. He was boomed for the presiden-
tial nomination twice.
Senator LaFollette advocated that
all nominations of candidates for pub-
lic office be by direct vote of the peo-
ple, and that railway property be taxed
at the same rate, and by the same sys-
tem as other taxable property, and
that states should control railway
rates within the state.
Tichets for the lecture are selling
at 25 cents. They are in the hands of
students on the campus, and are sold
at the box office in University hall.

Tickets for the banquet which will
be tendered the football team, by the
Ann Arbor Civic Association at 6:30
o'clock Monday night in the Armnory,
have been placed on sale at the Mich-
igan Union, Huston Brothers, Swit-
zer's Hardware Store and at all of the
local banks. In view of the fact that
the dinner will be the real culminating
event of tle 1914 football season, a
large attendance is expected.
The admission price has been set at'
$1.00 per plate. This is the first time
the Civic Association has ever attempt-
ed a function of this nature, and, if
successful, the authorities plan to
make it an annual affair. Many years
ago it was customary for the Ann Ar-
bor business men to favor the grid-
ders with a banquet at the end of the
season.
It is urged that all wishing tq at-
tend, purchase their tickets before
noon today, in order that those in
charge may be able to ascertain how
many they will have to accommodate.
Regent Junius E. Beal has been se-
cured to act as toastmaster at the
dinner. George J. Burke, prosecuting
attorney, and E. F. Mills, a local busi-
ness man, will give talks to the bai-
queters, and it is expected that Dean
Bates will also be one of the speakers.
Toastmaster Beal is making efforts to
obtain former mayor Codd, of Detroit,
as one of the principal speakers.
RABBI NEUMAN WILL ADDRESS
MENORAH MEETING SUNDAY
Dr. A. A. Neuman, M.A., at Columbia,
rabbi and doctor of Hebrew literature,
from the Jeish Theological seminary
o; New York, will speak at Newberry
hall at 8:00 o'clock Sunday night, un-
der the auspices of the Menorah so-
ciety. Dr. Neuman's specialty is Jew-
ish history in Medieval Spain. His
subject Sunday night will be, "Jewish
Social Life in Medieval Spain." The
lecture is open to the public, and ev-
eryone is cordially invited to attend.

In honor of freshman women, the
thirty-fourth annual Freshman Spread,
given by the sophomores, will be held
in Barbour gymnasium at 8:00 o'clock
tonight. This is the oldest tradition-
ary function given by university wom-
en, all of whom are invited. Juniors
will act as escorts for the guests of
honor, the freshmen, while the seniors
and the graduates will come as invited
guests.
Dean Myra B. Jordan, the wives of
the deans of the various departments,
Mrs. John R. Effinger, Mrs. Henry M.
Bates, Mrs. Mortimer E. Cooley, Mrs.
Victor C. Vaughan, Mrs. Karl E.
Guthe, Mrs. Julius O. Schlotterbeck,
Mrs. Nelville S. Hoff and Mrs. Wilbert
B. Hinsdale, and Dr. Elsie S. Pratt
and Miss Alice Evans, director of Bar-
bour gymnasium, will act as patron-
esses.
By tradition the spread is informal,
and Virginia Morse, '17, general chair-
man of the executive committee, the
judiciary council and Mrs. Jordan
have united in asking university wom-
en to observe its informality. Upper-
class women are particularly request-
ed not to send flowers to the freshmen
whom they escort,. nor to use car-
riages.
A grand march, favor dances for the
underclassmen, and refreshments, will
be features of the evening. Partners
for the dances will be found under the
initials of freshman women, those of
the upperclass women having been dis-
regarded in the grouping.
Guest tickets, at 50 cents, which en-
title the holders to dancing and re-
freshments, may be purchased of Mrs.
Jordan at her office today.
All freshman women are requested
to come to the spread whether their
escort calls for them or not.
Service Talk Given by Dr. Burrell:
Dr. Henry J. Burrell, of the homeo-
pathic hospital staff, delivered the first
of a series of talks on the Y. M. C. A.
social service course, last night in
McMillan hall. Dr. Burrell's subject
was "First Aid to the Injured."

Automobiles to Call at Fraternity
Houses for Contributions
Owing to the fact that the third ban-
ner to advertise the Belgian Relief
Fund movement was not placed near
the engineering building until yester-
day, the collection of clothing will not
start until today. Automobiles prob-
ably will call today at the fraternity
houses to collect the contributions.
Because of the delay, the campaign
will continue through Monday. Con-
tributions may be left at all hours of
the day at the Church of Christ, on
South University avenue, across from
Memorial hall. Suits of clothes are es-
pecially desired, but anything will be
Iaccepted.
Only a few offerings have been re-
ceived as yet.
WILL POSTPONE UNION BRIDGE
TOURNAMENT TO NEXT FRIDAY
Because of the fact that sufficient in-
terest had not been aroused, it was
decided to postpone the beginning of
the Michigan Union bridge tournament
until next Friday night at 7:30 o'clock.
When the entries had closed last night,
not enough had entered to warrant the
playing of the first round.
Further entries will be received this
week, and E. R. McCall, '16L, chair-
man of the committee in charge, de-
sires all who care to enter, to leave
their names at the Union.
Tickets on Sale For Tonight's Dance
Tickets are now on sale for the Un-
ion dance to be held at 9:00 o'clock
tonight, and more than 50 were sold
late last night. Martin H. Galt, '16L,
is chairman of the committee, and the
chaperones are Dr. F. R. Waldron,
and Mrs. Waldron, Prof. George W.
Patterson, and Mrs. Patterson.
Announcement Made of Selection of
February 22 as Tentative
Date for Concert
WILL FEATVRE 20 MINUTE PLAY
That another "Band Bounce" will be
held in February, was the announce-
ment of Mr. S. J. Hoexter, manager of
the Varsity band, yesterday. Febru-
ary 22 has been set as the tentative
date.
While the program is indefinite as
yet, it is understood that it will be
along the lines of the first concert,
consisting of vaudeville, serious and
frivolous. An -effort will be made to
have as varied a program as possible.
One of the features which has al-
ready been decided upon, is a short
play, the enactment of which would
require about 20 minutes. The plan
is to have open competition for the
writing of the play, the only require--
ment being that all compositions are
to be submitted to the University of
Michigan Band association before Jan-
uary 7, 1915. Further information
may be secured by application to the
office, which is located on the second
floor of the engineering shops build-
ing.
It -has also been decided to stage
a series of short one act plays, part of
which will be in pantomime. While
several of these have already been
written, two or three more can be us-
ed. Competition for these is open as
in the case of the playlets.
A "rube band" number is being

worked up, and rehearsals of the en-
tire organization will be held, to pre-
pare more concert music for the oc-
casion.
The library of the band now includes
all the music from past Michigan Un-
ion operas, and Charles D. Kountz,
'02L, writer of the new song, "That
Michigan Band," is also preparing
more. concert music.

WALKER PEDDICORD DISPLAYS
TALENT OF EXPERIENCED ACTOI
Professor Hollister, Director, WE
- Pleased With Result of,
Performance
In one of the most finished pla
that has been presented by Mlchig
students, "A Curious Mishap" drew
good sized and appreciative audien:
*o University hall, last night. "All d
especially well, and the cast was WE
balanced," said Prof. R, D. T. Holli
ter, director of the production. "T
experience which the cast gained, wi
serve them in good stead for the ne
performance." The play will be r
peated tonight, at 8:15 o'clock.
Walker Peddicord, '14-'16L, as Phi
ibert, played the part of an old kin
hearted Dutch merchant, with an e:
ceilent presentation of character. .
no time did he drop the personali
of the proud merchant, and he put tI
feeling and expression into the pa
worthy of one with much mdore exp
rience. Francis Hickok, '15, his daug]
ter, Giannina, in the play, took a pa
that required natural sweetness am
even disposition, and Miss Hickok he
the necessary requirements. She p1
much feeling into the play, and kne
how to win her auiience at the star
and to keep it with her to the end. r
the part of a French lieutenant, Lou
Eich, grad, played opposite Mi:
Hickok. Though the play is a tho
ough comedy, there are plaices in wh
the talents of Mr. 'Eich were task
to make a love scene genuine, and 1
handle a stupid father,carefully.
Riccardo, a rival in business,
Philibert, was taken by Leslie L Is
'14-'17L. Mr. Lisle had a diffcult pa
to portray, that of an eccemftrlo am
greedy broker. His first scene on t
stage brought. applause from the ai
dience. His daughter in the play, CO
tanza, was impersonated by Bess Ba
ker, '15. Miss Baker worked consclei
tiously, and carried her part wil
much skill and spirit.
The comedy was supplied by ti
lines and situations, mostly, but xi'
a little merriment was secured by t
audience, from the clever antics
Ethyl Fox, '15, as Mariana, and Ea
Ross, '15, as Gascoigne. The effor
of both deserved the applause they
frequently won. Miss Fox is natural
fitted for .her part by her size and ac
ive energy, and showed unusual adap
ibility to the varying circumstanci
of the plot. Trhe entire cast show
much spirit.
Tickets fo tonight's performan<
will be on sale at the bok of"ice in Un
versity hall. General admission is
cents, and reserved seats are t50 cent
PROF. J. P.. BIRD OPENS YEAR'S
PROGRAM OF CERLE FRANCA]
Prof. J. P. Bird, of the engineerim
department, will open this year's pr
gram of the Cercle Francais, by a
address to be delivered December.
in Tappan hall. He has taken for h
subject, "La Traversee de la Fran
Pendant la Guerre," and will rela
personal experiences in that counti
during the early part of the prese
conflict.
Associate membership tickets wi
be sold by the French faculty and b
members of the Cercle. Students wi
be charged 50 cents, and others o
dollar. Mail orders may be sent to t
Cercle's director, Mr. H. V. Wann.
Opera Poster Design Tryouts to Me
All tryouts for the poster desg
contest of the opera will meet at 7-:
o'clock, Tuesday night, at the Mi
gan Union. A prize of 10 dollars w

be given for the best poster, two tic
ets for the second best, and one tick(
for the third best.
Health Forces Sophomore Lit to Lea
L. James Bulkley, '17, has gone
his home in Detroit suffering with
attack of jaundice. His condition w;
reported by friends yesterday, to
improved. He will probably be ab
to return to his work; some time ni
week.

FIRST PLAY MAKEl
ROUSIN6 SUOcE~
"A Curious Mishap" Draws Appre
tive Audience to University

U

Thursday*
Dec. 10
8 P.M.

he university yesterday. ---

y. I

Daily

Delivered to you for the rest of the year.

- ,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan