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October 04, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

e

Michigan

DailyI

"NOW

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1914.

PRICE] FIVE C

* * * * *

ESTERIDA'S F O'TBAI
SCORES
----
vard 44, Springfield Y.

IL

*:

4Now! For a Cheer! They Are
Here! Ta-r-ra Ta-r-ra Ta-r-ra-*
Boom! Boom! Y ea-a-a-a Band!

{

olgate 7, Cornell 3
anderbilt 42, Henderson 6
isconsin 21, Lawrence 0
urdue 27, Wabash 3
hicago 35, Indiana 0
ebraska 14, Washburn 7
. A. C. 35, Olivet 7
enyon 7, Western Reserve 6
ufts 61, Bates 7
rinceton 10, Bucknell 0
avy 13, Georgetown 0
& M. 10, Pennsylvania 0
rown 20, Rhode Island 0
thigh 21, Carlisle Indians G
artmouth 74, Norwich 0
enn State 22, MIuhlenberg 0
rracuse 81, Hamilton 0
-my 35, Stevens 0
& J. 105, Dickinson 0
ale 21, Virginia 0
ichigan 69, Case Tech 0
* * * * *

M.- *
*
*
*
*.
*
*
*
*
*
,*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

"When the band begins to play,
my lads,
' When the band begins to play!"
-Kipling
Forty blue clad musicians. swing
eight abreast onto the oval of velvet
green. To the jerky tap of the snare
drum, the rows wheel into place be-
hind the whitened goal posts. A shrill-
ing blast of the drum major's whistle
puts the body into motion. The first
row passes beneath the crossbar; an-,
other thrill of the whistle, . a flashy k
swirl of the silver knobbed baton andk
the first martial notes of="The Victors"
crash through the air.

clapping and drowning the nctes
played by the band now crossing the
50 yard line. A cheer leader springs
from his half hidden seat, raises his
megaphone for an Instant, then casts
it away to fit the motions of his body
to the long drawnout, "Yea-a-a, band!"
Even the prosaic, hardened newspa-
per cdrrespondent, whose pen and
typewriter have told the world of
countless Michigan victories and sev-
eral Michigan defeats, half rises from
his seat and forsakes the lead of his
story. His eyes glisten, his face glows
and a quiver flashes up and down his,
spine. And he and his descendants will
continue to do this until bands are no
more.
A football game without a band is
a Donnybrook fair without a shillalah.
"When the band begins to play,
my lads,
When the band begins to play!"

*RU! ES FOR PALL CONTESTS,
* IT4URDA,tylOCTI. 10.
* Begin at 9:30 o'clock. *
* Three poles, 26 feet high. *
* Fresh defend poles, sophs at- *
* tack. *
Sophs advance toward end poles
* in two equal columns from op- *
' posite sides of field. *
* Sophs have 30 minutes to gain *
* three flags. *
* Flag's must be surrendered to *
* referee immediately. *
* All contestants must wear ten- *
* nis shoes. *
* Use of instruments or grease *
* forbidden. *
* Posting of proclamations forbid- *
* den. *
* Each class chooses 30 men for *
*~ cane sprees. *
* One point awarded to class win- *
* ning majority of canes. One *
* point for each end pole. *
* Two points for centre pole. *
* * * * * * * * *
UN1VERSITY NEWSLETTER GOES .
JNTQ ALL PARTS OP COUNTRY

k
k
4
C
G
e
C

VARHSITY RAMBLES
FOR 10_GCOUNTER
Yost Machine Breaks Own Record F
Speed, Making 69 Points in
40 Minutes Against
Case

TEAM
IN

SHOWS MIDSERlSON
SPITE OF SUBSTIT

Scrappy Scientists Mtke Iast
Against Second String But
Avail Little
Rolling up the largest total t

A ripple of clapping palms passes
over the packed north stand. The rip-
ple increases in volume; it reverber-
ates from stand to stand and the echo
crashes back across the field. A rum-
ble of cheers, unorganized, delirious
and powerful roars from the crowded
wooden tiers, mingling with the hand-

CONTEST FOR
A CLOSES OCT.

15

Early

ans Active Work,
aration For More
rished Show

Publicity Bureau Keeps World
formed of Happenings on
-Iichiganu Campus

In-

All contributions in the
writing the mfisic for the

contest for
1915 Union

d. opera must be submitted by October
e 30 at -the Union. About 15 men are
known to be writing music for the
n- competition, and there are probably
e others who are not known to the com-
s mittee.
The manuscripts after they have
been submitted will be gone over by
the judging committee. Then the
writers will be asked to appear before
the comimttee and play their own piec-:
e. es. Announcement for the successful
writers will be made very soon after
the date when the contributions must
g be submitted.
As soon as the music has been decid-
I_ ed upon active work in preparing the
opera'for presentation will be begun.

NIN E CHOSEN FRuHIE S9r
Complete List of Student Editors For
Legal Monthly Includes
Twenty-Four
Names
ELECTION BASED ON SCHOOL
STANDING AND POPULARITY

Initial Issue of Present Season
Scheduled for Appearance
November 5

Is

VERNOR FERRIS
0 ADDRESS MEN
C. A. Offers Well Planned Pro-
gram at Year's First "Y"-

na, ' I
goy.1

amver-
nivam- Majestic Meeting
cam-
Upsi- ADMISSION WILL BE BY TICKET
s and
Lazier Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris, can-

didate for re-election as governor in
the coming election,, will speak to
university students at the first Y. M.
C. A. meeting of the year,.in the Ma-
jestic theater, at 6:30 o'clock tonight.
Governor Ferris has been active along
educational lines for many years, be-
ing the founder and president of Fer-
ris Institute.
* Admission tothe meeting will be by
tickets which have been distributed
- from the association headquarters on
State street. After 6:.25 o'clock no
seats will be reserved and seats re-
maining will be turned over to the
general public. Paul Wagberm, '16E,

Prof. Evans Holbrook, editor-in-
chief of the Michigan Law Review, an-
nounced today that nine more senior
laws had been elected to complete this
year's staff. John, G. Cedergren,
Charles Davidson, Arend V. Dubee,
Herbert H. Harshman, Charles J. Hil-
key, Buell McCash, Leslie C. McClel-
land, Karl J. Mohr, and Henry Rotts-
chaefer are the new men.
Those elected last spring are: W.
F. Black, H. C. Bogle, M. K. Brown,
L. M. Hall, V. H. Hampton, F. J. Ken-
nedy, W. I. McKenzie, S. W. Marx, R.-
B. O'Harra, A. M. Reed, W. R. Roberts,
Saverio Rosato, C. G. Schoeffel, E. R.
Thurston, and J. G. Tucker.,
Elections are based on scholastic,
standings, the choice being made from
a list of candidates who were selected
by the class as a whole.
The Michigan Law Review is a legal
periodical published monthly, and ed-
ited by members of the senior law
class, and the law faculty, The scope
of the magazine includes articles on
important legal subjects, comments on
current topics in the .legal world, di-
gests of recent cases, book reviews,
and comments on legal literature. Cir-
culation is mostly among practicing
lawyers and its subscribers are found
on every continent except Africa. The
first issue will appear November 5.
New Presidtnt For Glee Club Chosen
George J. Curry, '15M, has succeeded
Kingsley Gould, '14-'16L, as president
of the glee club for the season of 1914-.
15.

W iu o FOR EIGNSTUDENTS ,
Number Falls Off '1y Twenty-Seven
Compared 'With Last Year
Following European
Trouble
TWENTY-SIX COUNTRIES ARE
REPRESENTED BY 137 PEOPLE
Michigan's Department of Dentistry
Draws Many From South
Africa
War has had its effect on the ranks
of foreign students enrolled at Michi-
gan. There are 27 fewer students from
foreign lands this year, due directly
or indirectly td the war.
Twenty-six foreign countries are
represented in the university this year
by 137 students. These figures were
compiled by Prof. J. A. C. Hildner,
chairman of the comimttee on foreign
students, from the enrollment files of
all the departments. It is believed
that there are many more foreign stu-
dents in Ann Arbor who have not been
l able to register because their money:
was held up in passing through the
warring countries. Five Chinese stu-
dents, who were stranded here because
their funds were delayed enroute
through Europe, received money by
the Pacific route yesterday.,
China leads the foreign nations with
37 students enrdlled in the university.
Porto Rico and Canada are a close
second and third with twenty-two and
twenty-one respectively. South Africa
has 10arepresentatives at Michigan.
There are. six students each frome the
PhilippineIslands, Turkey, and Japan;
five from Hawaii, four from India and
two each'from Holland and Russia.
Other nations represented are Eng-
land, Argentine, Bulgaria, Austria, Ur-
uguay, Persia, Ecuador, Brazil, New
Zealand, Greece, Mexico, Asia Minor,
Colombia, Australia, and Armenia. The
sun never sets on the lands represent-
ed at Michigan.
It is a significant fact that all of the
students from South Africa are regis-
(Continued on page 4.)

Freshmen and Sophomores Will
It Out on Ferry Field,
Oct. 10

Fight}

According to Prof. John R. Brumm
of the rhetoric department, who is in'
chargerofethe service, the University
news bureau will this year take the
form of weekly letters of a column's
length each, published in about 250
newspapers in this state. The aim of
the editor is to place the University
before the public with items of re
searc'h work, new buildings being
erected, and social problems which'
-confront the faculty. The articles are
intended primarily to attract the in-
terest of the parents.
All special inquiries and requests
_romn magazines and institutional pap-
ers are answered by the editor, who
also gives out11advrance Vrite-ups of
alumni gatherings in various sections
of the country. This work in no way
is intended to compete with the local
correspondents.
COMING SATURDAY4
SET FOR HCONTESTS"

also

Michigan team has ever scored in t
eighteen games against the Clevelan
ers, the Varsity ran wild on Case, ye
terday afternoon, in a 69 to 0 gan
'Three touchdowns came tin ea
the first three quarters, while the Su
stitutes managed to hang up anoth
ringer in the final period.
"JBuzz" Catlett and ""Tommy",Hug
itt divided"the individual honors.uCg
lett threw the three forward pass
which were successful, and with Hug
itt led the Wolverine backs in op
field running. Catlett's sweeping das
es from punt formation .were on
equalled by the work of Huhitt
returning kick offs. Catlett -once to
off 65 yards, while Hughitt negotiat
75 for the longest gain of the day.
Ilughitt also kicked.all nine of tl
goals from touchdown which .he a ,1
temnpted, kicking wide on the punt oi
on the final effort. The two veteraz
were not alone in the spectacular o
fensive tactics, however. Splawn toi
off several long runs, while Maulbetac
and Roehm hit the line in big leagL
fashion.
Catlett, Hughitt, Maulbetsch an
Roehm sdored two touchdowns apiec
while Dunne and Splawn each secure
one. "4orrie" Dunne, who 4tarted;
left end today, was the ost briillaz
of the youngsters on the line. :
blocking and tackling was equalt
that of Wednesday, which earned }4
the right to start, and in addition 1
was used to hit the line for a touc
down in the first period.
Captain Raynsford and Cochran wer
the stars of the linemen, the Wolverin
leader having improved consderabl
in his passing. Fumblin= was not a
prevalent as on Wednesday, but thre
balls getting away, and all being r
covered.
The Michigan attack would not 1
denied. It swept all before it, an
twice it took but a coupl of plays (f
touchdowns after the kick-offs, On tb
other hand, Michigan held Case to tw
fi'rst downs, both made on short foi
ward passes in the fourth period, wihe
a number of substitutes were in. Yos
used 27 different men yesterday, ever
man on the squad physically Lit gettin
a chance,
The Wolverines gained 275 yards
43 for Case on straight football in th
first half. Out of the 43 yards, 37 wer
made on a fake punt by Parshall, th
Buckeye ca'ptain, taking a leaf out.<
the Michigan book. On forward past
es, Michigan netted 80 yards out
eight attempfs. Catlett threw thre
one of which would have been goc
for a score had not the whistle for ti
end of the first half sounded just b
fore the ball was snapped. Staal
snared two passe, and the vetera
Lyons took in the other,
Roehin went over for the first scoi
in four minutes, Splawn starting th
Wolverine attack with a 40 yard ru
Splawn also produced a 30 yard ru
to start the march for the secon
counter, which Roehm also got. Afte
$plawn returned the kick 30 yard:
Maiflbetsch tore through center for 2
more, and Dunne was called back an
scored.
In the second period Hughitt score
early, a 75 yard run late in the firs
period by the veteran field genera
making the scbre possible. Catlei
then worked a pass with Lyons, an
"Buzz" scored. Catlett worked anoti
(Continued on page 4.)

FRESH" IN PEP MEET TIItURSI)AY
Freshmen and sophomores will set-
tle class grudges under the auspices
of Student Council and with the sanc-
tion of the university authorities on
Ferry field at 9:30 o'clock, next Satur-
day morning.
Freshmen will defend the poles from
which their flags w-ill fly. The sopho-
mores will attack the end poles be-
fore striking the central pole, about
which the big fight will take place.
After the flags have been torn down by
successful sophomores or after the
i'reshmen have withstood the as-
sailing sophs for the full 30 minutes,
the cane sprees will be staged. In
these, a 1917 man will tussle with a
1918 man for final, sole possession of
a three foot cane. There will be 30
such matches, and a point will be giv-
en to the class having the most canes
at the end of tenj minutes spreeing.
Men who get to the pole, out of
reach of freshman hands, climb the
poles, and tear down the flags, will be.
formally presented with them at a
subsequent council meeting.
Freshmen will meet Thursday night
to. organize for the rush. Four promi-
nent upper classmen will be on hand
to advise the freshmen and to start the
"pep." -Sophomores will meet the fol-
lowing night.
A large number of "M" men, and
former councilmen will be present to
keep the crowd in check, and to en-
force the rules.1

he first chairman of religious meetings, will!
ust be preside, and a chorus composed of stu-
e north dents will lead the singing. Preced-
Oct. 9, ing Governor Ferris' address, there
bulletin will be moving pictures beginning at
rest to 6: 10 o'clock.
Prof. J. Following his talk at the Majestic,
of the Governor Ferris will speak in the
appoint Presbyterian church beginning at 7:45
ements o'clock. - His subject, "Making the
charge World Better," will be of peculiar in-
ied on terest because, as governor of the
is es- state, he has become acquainted with
y be in the practical side of many social ques-
of the tions. This meeting will also be open
to university students.

GOVERNOR
WOODBRIDGE N. FERRIS
WILL SPEAK TO STUDENTS IN THE
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Sunday Evening, October 4, at 7:45 o'clock
Topic: MAKING THE WORLD BETTER

THE FIRST Y. M. C. A. MAJESTIC MEETING

Seats

oodbridge

.Ferris

Reserved

.

Until 6:

Piet

at 6:10

0

'Address Begins at 6:30

A

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