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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 25, 1914 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TEE MICHIGAN fDAILY

WIhat are yo a igolrag
to do Friday nfight
NOTHING!
Well, then corne t the
FINZEL DANCE

Second FINZEL

Dance

GRANGER'S ACADEMY

Y THE FiAmovs
JO Hop
Detroit Orahostre.

$1.00 PER COUPLE
Dancing from 9:00-10:00

Friday Nov. 27,

FOR TICKETS PHONE

236 OR 246

CIENCE BUILDING
UNITES FORESTERS
Completion of New Structure Will See
Beginning of New Era In
Work of Forestry
Department
12,000 SQUARE FEET ON FOUR
STORIES WILL BE UTILIZED
Year of Field Work Is Required For
Receiving of Master's
Degree
Scattered throughout three or four
different campus buildings, with offi-
ces in one, laboratories in another,
and library in a third, the forestry de-
partment is looking forward to the
time when it will move into quarters
in the new science building. Under
the present circumstances, it has been
impossible for the department to do
many of the things which it has at-
tempted. Inasmuch as it is necessary
that men from the department must
be in constant touch with other science
courses, both faculty and students are
forced to waste much time running
back and forth to other buildings.
In the new building, which will be
occupied by all the sciences but chem-
istry and physics, forestry will have a
section about 75 feet long, throughout
the basement and three stories, con-
stituting practically a separate build-
ing, and affording 12,000 square feet
of floor space. A common library will
accommodate forestry, botany, zoology,
geology, mineralogy and psychology.
Such accommodations will place the
forestry department on a more efficient
basis.
One of the greatest disadvantages
resulting from the present location is
that the department cannot be given
the most recognition and publicity.
General'knowledge concerning the de-
partment of- forestry among students
in the university, with the exception
of those in the department, is elemen-
tary.
It is not generally known that the
department is comparatively new, hav-
ing been founded in 1903. The course;
is not elementary training, but requir-
es five years for completion. A Bach-
elor's degree is given at the end of
four years, and the year following
must be spent in active work in the
field of forestry, usually in a govern-
ment position in the forest service.
At the end of that year, the student re-
turns to the university, and takes a
year's work preparatory to his Mas-
ter's degree, making, in all, a five year
course.
University of Michigan alumni for-
esters number 202, most of whom are
now actively engaged in the profes-
sion, not only throughout this country,
but in many different parts of the'
world. Although there are forestry
departments in various other univer-
sities that are larger and better than1
that of the University of Michigan, the1
local department is still young, but has
made big gains since its inauguration,
and the completion of the new science
building will mark a new era in this.
line of work.1
Announce Committee For Unio a lance
1. H. Phillips, '16E, chairman, Ray
J. Mlls, '16L, Warren E. Tal.ot, '3,'
and Fred B. Smith, '16E, are the com-1
wi tteemen for the membership danc-'
at the Michigan Union Saturday night.
"ickets will be o. sale at the Union
counter after 5:00 o'clock. tonsorrow
afternoon.

UfOS.1OPOLITAN CLUB TO GVE
IJINESE NIGHT IN DECEMBER
Chinese night, the second of a series
of international programs to be pre-
scntcd by the Cosmopolitan club, will
be held Friday evening, Decenber 4, in
Sarahi Caswell Angell hall. Tna en-
tertanment will te open to the public.
The rogram h i sbeen arrang1 ?y
em'crs of th Chinese Students'
club, many of Waom are also meuibers
a .he Cosmopolitan club. The pro-
gra-n is as follows: A talk on China i-
iustra ed with lintern slides will be
given by E. S. Sy, '15E, G. S. Ling,
"51' H. C. Lu4, '17E, B. D. Pang,
'7 ~. and W. C. Achi, '14'17, will
render several vocal numbers. H. Ko,
t, will give an exhibition of Cin-
, cse .huttlecock. Hr-. Lee, '17, accon-
:pnid by W. C. Achi, will give the
C.hi tse sword dance. The prorai
will be concludedby a talk on the
>ubject of international peace by G. .
Young, '15E.
You May Not'
Believe It, But-
AMES, IA., Nov. 22.-Frank Gotch,
world's champion wrestler, came down
from Humboldt, Friday, to visit the
college. In the evening he threw four
men in the gymnasium and gave a talk
to 600 wrestling fans.
Clad in purple tights, Gotch stepped
on the mat and was introduced by
President Pearson, of the college, who
said Gotch was an adopted son of
Ames because he married an Ames
graduate. After demonstrating sever-
al holds, Gotch took on A. H. McChord,
C. K. Hood, E. P. Albrook and E.
Brandt, throwing them at will. Impa-
tient at the efforts of Brandt to keep
his shoulders off the mat, Gotch good
humoredly pulled the corner of the
mat over him, and rolled him up in it.
Gotch said, "My success has not
been due to my strength, but to my
training. If the American people
would learn to be ready for every con-
test they would not have so many de-
feats. Fighting is a good thing for
every man. Learn to be a fighter.
Take care of your stomach and you
will develop yourself. The seat of
strength is in the stomach and no other
place. Be ready!"
.I
I 4
A I
HOW TO APPRECIATE THE DRAMA.,
By Thos. Littlefield Marble (808.2 M3)
Casual students of the drama willE
find Mr. Marble's little book full of
rudiments which are of value in esti-
mating the worth of current plays.'
The treatment seems to make no pre-
tense of exhaustiveness, and its brev-
ity gives it additional interest.
An analytical diagram is among the
contents. A number of well-known
dramas, together with one written byl
the author, are printed in full or in,
part, with cross references to the dia-
gram.
The historical development of the
drama is presented in the most concise1
form Imaginable, with emphasis on the
points which are useful in taking to
pieces the plays of today. The book ist
interspersed with an even two dozen
cuts of actors and playwrights.
After the Turkey dinner Thanksgiv-
ing'go to the Majestic. 49-50-51

CAMPUS WILL SE E
MODERNBUILDING
Equipment of New Science Building
Promises Accommodations Equal
To Those of Similar
Edefices
WILL CONTAIN AUDITORIUM TO
CARE FOR ABOUT 500 PERSONS
Provides Cave in Sub-basement For
Rearing and Watching Growth
of Animals '
Michigan's new science building,
across from Hill auditorium, will be
one of the best equipped buildings of
its kind. The structure is four stories
in height, and the general shape is
similar to a triangle. It extends from
the diagonal walk to North University
avenue, a distance of 262 feet, and, on,
the north side, a distance of 243 feet.
The first floor will be constructed of
Bedford limestone, while the entrances,
will be of Berea sandstone. The ce-
ment columns, reaching from the first
floor to the roof, will be covered with
tapestry brick, similar to the brick
used in Hill auditorium. A border of
terra cotta will extend around the top
of the building. The two main en-
trances will be on the north and east
sides, while two smaller entrances
will open on the diagonal walk.
A large auditorium, holding 500 per-
sons, will be situated in the first two
stories of the space, enclosed by steel
work. Above the lecture room, a gen-
eral science library will be located,
which will be fitted with all modern
appliances. Two parallel rows of
rooms, separated by a corridor, will
be located on each floor. The inner
row wil face on a courtyard about
120 feet square.
In this new building, which will
cot about $400,000, and which will
be ready for occupancy in October
1915, will be housed the botany, zo-
ology, forestry, geology, mineralogy
and psychology departments. Each
department will be assigned to a cer-
tain portion of each floor, andwill
be provided with separate lecture
rooms and laboratories, suitable to
their particular needs. Besides a
complete system of water, gas and
compressed air piping, each labora-
tory will be equipped with a vacuum
cleaner system.
The building will also be replete
with many of the modern scientific
conveniences. Among these is a cave
In the sub-basement. In this cave,
animals will be reared under cave
conditions, to make better research
work possible. The structure also con-
tains a temperature-controlled room
for the purpose of rearing animals,
and regulating their environment.
A room for preparing skins and
skeletons for use as specimens in the
zoological laboratories will be provid-
ed. On the second floor will be lo-
cated the public museums of the geol-
ogy and mineralogy departments. In
connection with the botany depart-
ment, an added feature of a green-
house will be provided. Octagonal in
shape, it will extend about thirty feet
out from the south side of the build-
ing by the "diagonal walk. For the
use of the psychology department, a
padded room, which is sound proof,
will be installed.
For employing motion pictures in the
teaching of scientific subjects, a special
room for the preparation of films will
be installed. The equipment will also
include a large photo-enlargement
studio for the enlargement of charts,
and a micro-photographic room. There

will be three or four times as much
floor space. in the new building, as
is, gvailable in the present quarters,
occupied by the science departments.
Chemical Society Pieks. New Officers
At the meeting of the University
of Michigan section of the American
Chemical society, held at 4:15 o'clock
yesterday afternoon in room 151, chem-
istry 'building, the fgllowing officers
were elected for the year: Chairman
of the local section. Dr. L. H. Cone;
councillor, Dr. S. L. Bigelow; secreta-
ry, Dr. H. H. Willard; executive com-
mittee, Dr. M. Gomberg, Prof. W. G.
Smeaton, and Prof. B. W. Peet, of the
Michigan State Normal College. With
the exception of Dr. Cone, the same of-
ficers served last year.

TO
TICTOR CLARENCE VAUGHAN.

Medical association, the most promi-
nent body of physicians in the United
States. He is a member of the French
and Hungarian Societies of Hygiene,
and of the American Philosophical so-
ciety. He is the author of many books
of a scientific nature, and is a contrib-
utor of more than 150 original papers
to current and scientific literature.
In 1876, he was tendered the de-
gree of Ph.D. by the University of
Michigan, and he received his degree of
M. D. in 1878. He received the degree
of Sc.D. from the University of Penn-
sylvania in 1897, and L.L.D. from the
University of Michigan in 1900, and
from Central College in 1910.

Victor Clarence Vaughan, dean of
the medical department was born at
Mt. Airy, Randolph City, Missouri, on
October 27, 1851. He spent the great-
er portion of his life in the west, par-
ticularly in Missouri. He took his pre-
paratory work in his native city, later
going to Mt. Pleasant College, a Mis-
souri institution, from where he was
graduated in 1872 with the degree of
Bachelor of Science.
He then came to the University of
Michigan and spent the next three
years in graduate work, at the end of
which time the board of regents con-
ferred the degree of Master ofScience
upon him. The same year he accepted
a position on the university faculty
as an assistant in the chemical labor-
atory, and after remaining at that
work until 1879, he was tendered the
position of a lecturer on medical
chemistry.
The following year he was made an
assistant professor, and in 1883 he was
appointed to the chair of professor of
physiological and pathological chem-
istry and associate professor of thera-
peutics and materia medica. He con-
tinued in this work until 1887, when
he was given the chair of professor of
hygiene and physiological chemistry,
together with the duties of director of
the hygienic laboratory.
In 1890 he was tendered the exec-

utive position of dean of the medical
department, and he has held that po-
sition continuously since that time.
During the years which he has
had the direction of the med-
ical department, that branch of
the university work has made rap-
id strides, until at the present time the
Michigan medical school is among the
foremost in the country, and enjoys a
rating with the American Medical as-
sociation which is surpassed by no
other institution in the country.
Dean Vaughan was a member of the
Michigan State Board of Health from
1883 until 1895, and he has been a
member of that body continuously
since 1901. He has been the presiding
officer of the board since 1911, during
which time, he has been prominent in
promoting various measures for the
benefit of the public health.
In the Spanish American war Dean
Vaughan served in the Santiago cam-
paign as a major and surgeon with the
33rd Michigan Volunteers, and he was
appointed a division surgeon in 1898.
He was .later recommended by the
President of the United States for the
brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. In 1906
he was appointed Surgeon General of
the Spanish American War Veterans.
He was president of the Association
of American Physicians in 1908-1909,
and is now president of the American

TEXANS ADOPT CONSTITUTION
TO MAKE NEW SECTIONAL CLUB
Students from Texas adopted a con-
stitution for Michigan's new sectional
organization at a meeting held at the
Union last evening. Much enthusiasm
was evinced for the future prospects
of the new club.
According to the constitution, all
men students in the university from
Texas are eligible for active mem-
bership. Texas women students and
those at Ypsilanti Normal College are
entitled to become honorary members.
An invitation to+ become honorary
members of the club has been extend-
ed to those on the faculty who come
from the Lone Star state.
Since there is not ample time to pre-
pare for the proposed get-together be-
fore Thanksgiving Day, that plan has
been abandoned, and in its place a
dance has been suggested, to be held
prior to the Christmas holidays.
Carter the Magician will have the
biggest act ever at the Majestic.

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i

.Thanksgiving Day Special
The Arcade Theatre
"THE FOLKS FROM WAY DOWN EAST"
Shows as usual, 2:30, 4:00, 6:15, 7:45, 9:15
TEN CENTS
Comimg: "MIC 1AIL STROGOFF" by Jules Verne starring
Jacob Adler, November 27-28.
"When Broadway was a Trial" A Shubert Feature, Nov. 30, Dec. 1

m

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