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November 24, 1914 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1914-11-24

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Michigan

Daily

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No. 49.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1914.

PRICE FIVE

. ..W

UNION VAUDEVILLE
PLANS ANNONED
L. K. Friedman, '15, Selected to Fill
G#neral Chairmanship Vacancy
Left By C. L. Kendrick's
Resignation
MANAGEMENT WILL PICK STARS
FROM CHOICE CAMPUS TALENT
Amateur Thespians Already Assigned
to Acts; Several Skits
Submitted
At a meeting of the committee on
committees of the Mimes, Michigan
Union operatic society, held yesterday
afternoon, L. J. Friedman, '5, was
elected to fill the vacancy created by
the resignation of Charles L. Ken-.
drick, '15, from the general chairman-
ship of "Spotlight Vaudeville,"- a se-
ries of skits to be produced at Hill au-
ditorium, Wednesday evening, Decem-
her 16. The new chairman has had
experience in connection with the,
Comedy club.
Owing to the scarcity of material
at last Thursday's tryouts, the man-
agement of "Spotlight Vaudeville"
has decided to entirely do away with
further tryouts, and to pick men from
the campus at large, who are known
to possess footlight ability of a high
standard. Several of the leading local
entertainers have already been assign-
ed acty, and preparations are well un-
der way.
In answer to the call for skits, sev-
eral novel efforts have been submit-
ted. . Among these are playlets by
". R. Melton, '13, author of last year's
MichAean Union Opera, Leon Cunning-
ham, '16, and George Moritz, '15-'17L.
Melton's skit is entitled "Gimme
Death," and is a take off on the mak-
ing of "motion pictures.
Leroy Scanlon, '16L, is preparing a
musical act, which will be entirely dif-
ferent from anything in this line that
has made its appearance on the local
platforms. It has been decided to do.
away with motion pictures, and to
make the performance a series of six
skits.
Chairman John Leonard, '16L,
the following assistant's: W. Sherwood
Field, '15, Arthur Torrey, '16, and
Boyd Compton, '16.
TWO SOCIETIES SELECT MEN
FOR INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATE
Three Representatives and Alternate'
Chosen From Literary
;* Organizations
In the preliminaries for the inter-
collegiate debate, which were held last
night in the oratory rooms of Univer-
sity hall, Samuel Witting, '15, ,P. A.
Miller, '17L, Isadore Becker, '15, Jac-
ob Levin, '15, as alternate, were se-
lected for the Michigan team. These
men were chosen from Jeffersonian
and Alpha Nu societies and four men
will be picked from Webster and Adel-
phi tomorrow night.
Michigan will meet Chicago and
Northwestern in the annual intercol-
legiate debate on January 15, on the
Question: "Resolved that the Monroe
doctrine should be abolished as a part
of our foreign policy." One team will
go to Evanston, where It will debate
with Northwestern, and Chicago will
come to Ann Arbor, where the debate
will be held in University Hall.

University Library is Eighth in Size
Statistics received at the university
library, show that Michigan leads all
state universities in the country in
size. Seven endowed university librar-
ies, Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Cornell,
Chicago, Pennsylvania and Princeton,
rank ahead of Michigan, which is in
eighth place this year. Last year'
Mchigan was ahead of Princeton, but
the large increase at the New Jersey
institution placed it ahead of Michi-
gan.

TODAY
Mr. R. W. Clark lectures on "Life
and Work of Ferdinand Zirkel,"
Tappan hall, 4:30 o'clock.
American Chemical society meets,
room 151, chemistry building, 4:15
o'clock.
Band benefit moving-pictures, Hill
auditorium, 7:00 o'clock.
Prof. W. W. Florer interprets "D'-
Zwiederwurz'n," Newberry hall, 7:00
o'clock.
Soph engineer smoker, Michigan Un-
ion, 7:15 o'clock.
Dixie club meets, Michigan Union,
7:00 o'clock.
Canadian club meets, in Cosmopolitan:
club room, 7:30 o'clock.
Texas club meets, Michigan Union,
7:00 o'clock.
Coloradoclubkmeets, Michigan Union,.
7:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Moving-pictures, Hill auditorium, 7:00
o'clock.
Phi, Lamda Upsilon dance, Country
club; car leaves 8:10 o'clock.
LOST _TO6 VARSITY
Hughitt, Who Totals 58 Points During
Season, Will Be Missed By
1915 Squad
MAULBETSCH MAKES 72 TALLIES
Of the 12 men who scored Michi-
gan's 232 points on the gridiron this
season, "Tommy" Hughitt and his 58
points are practically all that are lost
to next season's team. Although Hugh-
itt scored exactly one-quarter of the
total points rolled up by the Varsity,
he ranks second in the list of score-
getters.
As would be expected, Maulbetsch
leads the team with 12 touchdowns,
for 72 points, which puts him among
the leading scorers of the country.
Hughitt's points came frbm an even
half dozen touchdowns, and 22 goals
from touchdowns.
Splawn was the other great scorer
of the team, garnering 40 points, on
five field goals, four touchdowns, and
one goal from touchdown. "Buzz"
Catlett, at halfback, crossed the op-
ponents' goal lines three times, while
Roehm placed fifth with two touch-
downs.
The part that the forward pass play-
ed in the Maize and Blue machine is
evident, from the fact that all four of

SgCCERITES STAGE
FRAY FOR HOlLIAY
Michigan Team Plays Last Home Game
of Season on Ferry Field
Thursday

MAY REPLAY GAME
TO DECIDE TITLE
Another Gridiron Contest Needed to
Establish Class Football
Supremacy

OPPOSES BATTLE CREEK ELEVEN MISTAKE GIVES SOPHS VICTORY
Michigan's soccerites will furnish Following a conference of the offi-

the athletic event for Thanksgiving
day, when they stage their hoe con-
flict with the Battle Creek Normal
eleven on Ferry field, in the last home
game of the season.
Coach McCall, who has been out of
the city for the past few days, return-
ed yesterday. He intends to give his
charges, some lively scrimmaging in
preparatlon for the final home strug-
gle.
The Battle Creek game, which was
scheduled to be played in the break-
fast food eity last week, was postponed
at tho last minute on account of in-
clement weather which made play m-
possible. No definite date has been
set for"the playing oft of this game,
although it is likely that it will be
played.
The Normalites are reported to have
a formidable aggregation in soccer,
and their appearance on Ferry field
promises to draw an unusually large
crowd.
ARRANGE TEACHERS' GYM CLASS
Dr. 0. A. May Inaugurates Training
For Athletie Instructors
Dr. G. A. May, director of Waterman
gymnasium, will- start- a new class in
advanced gymnasium woik, at 4:15
o'clock tomorrow. 'It has been found
that there is a demand for teachers
and athletic coaches who can take
charge of a gymnasium, and Dr. May
has decided to install this course in
the theory and practiceof apparatus
work.
Instructions will be limited to sta-
tionary apparatus. Dr. May will have
charge of the work personally, and if
the size of the class warrants, the lec-
tures in theory will be given separate-
ly from the Wednesday classes. The
course is open to all,. whether they
expect to go into educational work or
not, and anyone may enter for his
own personal benefit. All students
interested in forming a class, of this
kind are asked to report to Dr. May
at 4:00 o'clock tomorrow.
TO RE-SCOUR ORGANIZATIONS
FOR LIKELY UNION MEMBERS
Canvassing will start today to secure
as a Union member, every member of
a house club or fraternity in the uni-
versity. Lists have been compiled,.
containing the names of members of
such organizations who have not joined
the Union. An endeavor to reach all
of these men will be made by the fol-
lowing committee: C. H. Lang, '15,
Cecil Brown, '15, J. R. Watkins, '15, L.
K. Friedman, '15, W. B. Palmer, '15,
and Lyle Harris, '15. Several frater-
nities already have their full member-
ships on the Union rolls.
Senior Engineers to Discuss Memorial
Senior engineers will discuss. the
question of giving the university a
memorial, at a meeting to be held
today Gordan McCabe, chairman of
the memorial committee, will submit
his report, n which a number of
suggestions as to a gift will be made.

cials in the soph lit-junior law cham-
pionship football game of last Satur-
day, it was agreed that a misunder-
standing in the course of the game
had given the victory to the lit team,
and it was decided that, if possible,
the two teams would meet again, eith-
er on Thanksgiving day, or next Sat-
urday.
The prospects for such a game were
given added weight, when the athletic
board of directors, in their meeting
yesterday afternoon, passed a resolu-
tion to the effect that the athletic au-
thorities recommended that the game
in question be played over. The author-
ities also came to the conclusion from
evidence submitted that the play in
question was a touchback and not a
safety.
There is no provision which can
force the lits to play another game
with the laws, but the sentiment has
been expressed by members of the lit
team that they would prefer a decisive
defeat for themselves, rather than a
questionable victory.
The misunderstanding arose .on the
scoring of the safety which won the
game for the lits. Thurston, the lit
halfback, had puntedin the third quar-
ter, the ball going 65 yards and rolling
over the laws' goal line after it had
touched Rowan, of the laws. Brown,
of the laws, recovered the ball behind
the goal, making a touchback of thea
play
This play caused argument at the
time, but was called a safety by the1
officials, due to a misunderstanding be-
tween the referee, umpire, and field
judge. When the play is considered as
a touchback the game was scoreless,
and a tie results, which may be played
off by the two teams.-
WILL HOLD SECOND DANCE OF
YEAR IN HARRIS HALL FRIDAY
Hobart Guild will give its second
dancing party of the season at Har-
ris hall at 8:30 o'clock Friday even-
ng of this week.- Invitations will be
seem to all Episcopal students of the
university who have paid their dues
to the guild treasurer.
The guild has -been reorganized re-
cently so as to include both social
land social service members.
GRADUATE STUDENTS TO HOLD
INFORMAL PARTY DECEMBER 11
Graduate students will hold their
next social event the night of Dec.
11, in Barbour. gym. The affair will
be given by the Graduate club, and
will be an informal party, open to all
graduate students, their wives and
husbands,twhether members of the
club or not.
A dancing program, featuring old
time dances, has been arranged, and
amusements of various sorts will be
provided throughout the evening for
those who do not care to dance.
Musical selections will be rendered by
various members of the Graduate
club.

MASQUES ATTEMPT TO OBTAIN
HACKETT'S AID FOR KERMISS"
Norman Hackett, , who appeared
in Ann Arbor as leading -man in the
"Typhoon" several weeks ago, will
coach the "Shades of Night" and "Al-
ice at Michigan," the two plays to be
presented by Masques at the "Ker-
miss," on December 12, in Hill audito-
rium, if plans of the committee mate-
rialize.
Correspondence is now being carried
on with Mr. Hackett by the committee.
Although no definite arrangements
have yet been made, it is hoped that
some agreement will be reached be-
fore the end of this week.
THANKSGIVING DANCE TICKETS
TO.BE PUT ON SALE TONIGHT
Tickets for the Union Thanksgiving
afternoon dance will go on sale at
5:00 o'clock this afternoon at the desk.
The dance will start at 3:00 o'clock
and will be conducted similar to the
regular weekly membership' dances,
Prof. Otto C. Glaser and Mrs. Glaser,
and Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Stevens
will act as chaperones. The committee
in charge consists of Fussell E. Dean,
'15, chairman, J. Leland Mechem, '16L,
Burton C. Budd, '15E, and J. W. Langs,
'.
PICTURES PORTRY
VARSITY -IN ACTION
Band 'Movies" Show Plays in Cornell
and Pennsylvania
Contests
HARVARD TRIP SHOWN INDETAIL
Opportunity to study and criticize
the plays of the Pennsylvania and Cor-
nell games, was given at the motion
picture exhibition, held in Hill- audito-
rium last night, under the ausices of
the Varsity band.
The Harvard trip was also portray-
ed, showing the band and rooters ar-
riving at the Copley-Plaza hotel in,
Boston, the Harvard stadium before
the game, the band marching and
making the "M" on Soldiers' field, and
the Michigan cohorts stopping at Niag-
ara Falls on the way home.
Coach Haughton, of Harvard, re-
fused to allow moving pictures to be
made of the game, on the ground that
other team's might use them to study
Harvard's style of play. Some of the
pictures of the Cornell and Pennsyl-
vania games, weretaken at :close
range and one shows Malbetsch
crossing Penn's goal line.
The pictures will also be displayed
tomorrow and Wednesday nights.
Three shows are given each night, at
7:00, 8:00 and 9:00 o'clock, with an
admission charge of 10 cents.
LAFOLLETTE SCHEDULED FOR
APPEARANCE IN AUDITORIUM
Under Auspices of Oratorical Society,
Wisconsin Senator to Talk, -
December '7
Senator Robert M. LaFollette has
been definitely secured to speak in
Hill auditorium on December 7, under
the auspices of the Oratorical associa-
tion. In an attempt to give everyone
an opportunity to attend, the manage-
nment has decided to give the number
at the price of 25 cents. Holders of the
association tickets will be given the
advantage of a block of reserved seats,
which will be held exclusively for
them until 8:00 o'clock of the evening

of the lecture.
The association has found it Impos-
sible to admit holders of season tickets
to this number without extra charge,
because of the contract which calls for
a percentage to the speaker, to be de-
termined by the number of persons in
the hall. Special accommodations,
however, will be given on this, as well
as on all other numbers, to purchasers
of season tickets.

JUNIOS ATTEMPT
Presidents McMahon and Smith Solicit
Support of Class Heads For
Peition to Restore
Social Event
WILL SUBMIT PLANS AT NEXT
MEETING OF SENATE COUNCIL
Function to Be Managed by Committe
Selected From All Junior
Classes
Pursuing their endeavor to make
the Junior, hop one of this year's so-
cial events, Don Smith and George Mc-
Mahon presdents fthe Junior engi-
neering and literary classes, last night
sent out letters to the presidents of all
the classes on' the campus, soficitn
their support. The letters ask the
class heads to get authority from their
respective classes, to sign a petition to
be presented to the senate council at its
next meeting.
McMahon and Smith will enlist the
support of all the juior class presi-
dents in drawing up the petition which
will be presented to the faculty exec-
utive body. This petition will contain
a plan for managing and organizing
the hop, but the advice of the: senate
council will be sought in making the
final arrangements.
According to the present plans, the
hop will be managed by a committee
elected by the junior classes. It will
be reasonable in cost. There will be
no booths or decorations, except such
as represent the entire university. The
floor committee will be under the or-
ders of the chaperones, and will be di-
rectly responsible for the conduct of
the dancers.
The plans lay special emphasis on
the democracy of the affair and its all-
university character.
Other details; may be added to the
plan before the meeting of the senate
council, and the whole plan is open
to the senate council's amendment.
The first action to be taken on the
letters by a class will be that by the
senior engineers, who meet this after-
noon.
The procedure which is being fol-
lowed this year is radically different
from that of last year. The committee
which had charge of the last hop, held
in February, 1912, drew up a plan,
by which all classes of organized and
unorganized students were to be ad-
mitted on equal terms, but the man-
agement was to be left in the haads
of the fraternities. The student coun-
cil appointed a committee, to which
were added representatives of the jun-
ior lits and the junior engineers, but
this 'committee awaited the action tak-
en by the senate council on the hop
committee's petition. The senate coun-
cil referred action on the petition to
the senate, which "deemed it inadvis-
able to permit a resumption of the
Junior hop" at that time.
4'DICK" SERIJOM UP AGAINST- IT
Armenian Student, Seeking Work, Un
able To Speak English.
"Dick" Serijom is .up agin' it. He
came here from Armenia this summer
to his brother who was working his
way through the university. He can
speak about one Americano word to
every thousand Turkish but he made
the Union employment bureau under-
stand his fix.
He came walking in yesterday, neat-

ly dressed and eager. After filling
the air with expressive gestures and
?sounds, he made the patient listeners
know that he had tried constantly
since school started to get work. All
he got was work for his breakfasts.
'An Armenian family has taken care
tof him so far but must stop because
of its own poverty. His brother has
all he can do to buy bluebooks for
himself. "Dick" can't find even a
kitchen job, although he is willing to
do anything.
"Dick's" up agin' it.

the ends receiving their letters
touchdowns. Cohn, at halfback,
a touchdown in an early game,
Bastian and Mead each scored a
from a goal after touchdown.
During the season, Michigan
a total of 32 touchdowns, 25
from touchdowns, and five field
more points than the Yostmen
made since 1905.

made
made
while
point
made
goals
goals,
L have

STUDENT COUNCIL TO SETTLE
VITAL CAMPUS LEGISLATION
Subjects which will be considered,
by the student council at its meeting
at 7:30 o'clock tonight, will include
the second reading of the amendment
of. the council's police powers, the re-
turn of the soph medics, and the
lengthening of the Christmas vacation.
The meetings of the council are open,
except in executive session.
Junior Lits Will Give Smoker Monday
As the first function on their social
program for the year,the junior lits will
hold a "get together" smoker at the
Michigan Union, next Monday, Novem-
ber 30. A good program is promised
by the social committee, who are sell-
ing tags to the affair at 25 cents each.

To Daily Advertisers
Owing to the fact that Thursday, November 26, is Thanksgiving,
and the Ann Arbor Press is closed, all copy for change of adds on
Friday, November 27, must be in by 2:00 p. m. Wednesday, November
25. The Daily will be issued both on Thanksgiving and on Friday,
. the 27th.

Cents
10,
Cents

TONIGHT!
Band's

Varsity

SEE THE
Movie Show

Cents
10
Cents

Harvard Trip, Pennsylvania, and Cornell Games. Behold Yourself in the Pictures.

il Auditorium

Three shows.

7:00, 8:00, 9.00 O'clock

Continuous Performance

Hill Auditorium

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