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November 22, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-11-22

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,L VAIL. Y.
Y~ MORNING

IC

1ichigan

SUBSCRIBE
al

_ _ ---

XXV, No. 48.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1914.

PRICE FIVE

........-.......

PUNT WINS TITLE
FOR SOPHOMORES
Close Contest For Campus Laurels, in
Football aoes to Second A
Year Men, 2 to 0,
Yesterday
TRURSTON'S RICK RESULTS IN
SAFETY AND DECIDES BATTLE
Campbell and Brown Play Stellar Ball
For Junior Laws; Field
Goal Fails
Thurston's long punt, in the third
quarter of the final game of the inter-
class football series, forced the jun-
ior laws to count a safety for the soph
lits, who walked off the field with the
campus championship in their pos-
session. The only' score of the day
was made, when Rowan downed the
ball behind his line for the two points
which defeated the laws.
In spite,of the heavy law line, the lit
backs did consistent work, straight
football being the rule of the dr.
Campbell and Brown did the ground
gaining for the laws, Campbell being
able to gain almost at will through
the lit line, while Brown's end runs
netted half of the total yards covered
by the laws.
The laws started, in the first quar-
ter, to hammer their way to the lit
goal, but were stopped at the 20 yard
line. Adams gained for the lits, who
showed .a strong come-back spirit,
rushing the ball past the center of the
field, before they lost it on downs.
The ball was the laws', at the begin-
z4ng of the second quarter, and Camp-
bell made first lown in two plunges.
Brown made a long run across the
field that netted five yards. The lit line
took a brace when Reid was substitut-
ed for Newton and held the laws for
dqwns. The lits failedto make their
downs and the ball went over to the
laws on the lit 20 yard line. Camp-
bell went through, and a touchdown
for the laws seemed sure, when time
was called for te half;
Between halves each team received
"pepper talks" from some of the Var-
sity men, the lits being lectured by
Bushnell and the laws by McHale.
The laws kicked off to the lits on the
start of the third quarter and Adams
returned to the center of the field. A
trick play lost about 10 yards for the
lits and Thurston punted. It was a
65 yard punt and went over the law
goal line after Rowan had made a safe-
ty possible. The ball was scrimmaged
on the 20 yard line and the'laws had
covered half the distance to. the lit
goal when the 4uarter closed.
The laws had the ball on the lit 20
yard line to start the fourth quarter,
and after Brown had run it to the cen-
ter of the field, it was lost on downs.
One more opportunity opened itself for
the lits when they carried the ball to
the laws 30 yard line, and attempted a
(Continued on page 6)
TRACK MANAGERS CONVENE TO
PROMOTE INTEREST IN TRACK
In an effort to perfect the present
plan for stimulating an interest in
track work, class track managers are
to meet Tuesday night with Trainer
Farell and Captain Smith of the var-
sly track scuad, at which time the
present scheme will be considered
more thoroughly.
Realizing that Michigan'sitrack
prospects are none too bright, it is the

intention of Trainer Farrell to.'enroll
the various frack managers as "scouts"
for varsity material. As soon as men
contesting for positions on class teams
show- unusual promise, they will be
reported to Trainer Farrell who will
shift them to the varsity squads. These
squads will work out under those
who have had experience in the diff-
erent events. Last Tuesday's meeting
started the new idea and it is hoped
that at th3 next gathering the plans
can be completed.

TODAY
Dr. J. Howard Melish, St. Andrew's
Episcopal church, 10:30 o'clock.
Major D. N. Travis, Michigan Union,
3:00 o'clock.
Hamilton Holt, Methodist church, 7:30
o'clock.
Final Mobilization mass meeting, Hill
auditorium, 3:00 o'clock.
"Dad" Elliot speaks at Presbyterian
church, 7:30 o'clock.

MAY STAGE OPERA
IN SIX BIG ClTIES
Detroit, Chicago, and Milwaukee Are
Among Places Listed For '
Trip in Spring 6
Vacation

STATEMENT CAUSES
TO BE DOUBLED

IiN TERERST
IN TRYOUTS

TOMORROW

Women's Educational club meets,
Newberry hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Band benefit moving-pictures, Hill au-
ditorium, 7:00 o'clock.
Laurence Binyon, on "The Art of As-
!a," Alumni' Memorial . hall, 8:00
o'clock.
Cercle Francais meets, Delta Gamma
house, 8:00 o'clock.
ASKHOLIDAYS OF
COUNCILFATHEl

University Officials 11ill Decide
Advisability of Granting
Extra Vacation

on

STUDENTS WISH EARLY START
In response-to many protests against.
the shortening of the Christmas vaca-
tion, A. T. Ricketts, '15E, president of1
the student council, took up the mat-
ter yesterday with university officials.
The senate 'council will consider the
question of dismissing classes the Fri-
day before the holid.ay, at its next
meeting.
Students have spoken to several
members of their representative board,
askd g'them to begin the circulation of4
petitions. The idea of petitioning the
faculty was dropped, because the sen-
ate council will take the same action
on the request of the student council,
as it wvould if the lists of signatures
were presented to it, according to as-
surances given to Ricketts by a uni-
versity official.
Students have objected to the vaca-
tion as announced in the calendar, be-
cause those living at a distance, and:
those who would not be 'able to leave
before Wednesday, would not arrive
at their homes until Christmas eve.
Others hold that the students are enti-
tied ~ t. a long Christmas vacation,
since the university is in session two
weeks later in the spring, than many
other colleges.
UNIVE.RS1Y WOMEN TO HELP
RELIEVE BELGIAN SUFFERERS
Respond: g to the opportunity pre-
sented by Miss Mildred Seyster, '13,
University of Illinois, at the social ser-
vice conference following Lloyd Doug-
las' address in Newberry hall Friday
evening, university women have enter-
ed the Belgian Relief movement insti-
tuted by lethany -Circle, a new univer-
sity Christian orgafization.
The work consists of sewing material
provided at the Church 'of Christ. Men
of the city and the state are providing
the money, which is used by Mr.
George Knepper, pastor of the church,'
to buy materials. Over 500 garments
have already been made, and 1,500 are
in the making.
Several of the sororities and organ-
ized women's clubs have signifiedtheir
intention of giving over special even-
ings for the work, -an groups have'
come from the State Normal College,
at Ypsilanti. The church is open for
work at all hours, except Wednesday
and Saturday evenings, some universi-
ty wonan being always in charge.

Will Hold Tests of Musical Scores
This Afternoon; Name of
Play is Altered
Sylvan S. Grosner, '12-'14L, author
of this year's Michigan Union opera,
announced last evening that present
plans succeeding, the 1914-15 opera
cast will play before six large cities
during the spring vacation,
These cities are Detroit, Grand Rap-
ids, Chicago, Milwaukee, South Bend,
and Toledo. A second performance
at Detroit z ill conclude the trip.
The statement has created great
enthusiasm. Such an inducement will
undoubtedly result in one of .the larg-
est cast try-outs ever held. Competi-
tion will be unusually keen among
the music and orchestra men as well.
Try-outs will be held for the 10 stu-
dents who have submitted musical
scores, at 2.30 o'clock this afternoon
in the University school of music. This
totals five complete scores. Grosner
says the caliber of these composi-
tions is unusually high.
The tryouts were supposed to have
been held last evening, but owing to
the act that several of the judges
were unable to attend, due to sick-
ness and being out of town, they had
to be postponed. Theodore Harrison,
of the school of music faculty, Ken-
neth Baxter, '15E, manager of the
opera, and Grosner will be the judges.
Some of the writers have submitted
pieces for former operas which were
seriously reconsidered as material.
Althougn the name of the play has
been changed from the one originally
given It by Grosner, the committee
refuses to tell what the piece will be
entitled.'.
Work 4n the production of the opera
has already been begun. Bert St.
John, director, Baxter, and Grosner,
have held several conferences in De-
troit. According to Mr. St. (John,
there will be absolutely no time wast-
ed in rewriting parts.
When Grosner wrote the play, he
submitted a large number of lyrics-
more than have ever been used. This
was done with the idea of giving a
broader scope of selection. However,
it has been decided to use all of his
lyrics, providing sufficient music of
a high standard, is submitted. '
SENIOR LITS "CASTLE HOUSE"
CABARET . DANCE IS SUCCESS
More than 150 people attended the
"Castle House cabaret" dance, given
by the senior lits at the Union yester-
day afternoon. The affair was the best
attended and most successful . the
history of the class.
Metropolitan cabaret numbers by
the "Meister Singers" quartette, of
Detroit, featured the program. G. B.
Smith, '16E, and F. D. Everitt, '16E,
put on a fancy dance number, while
Chase Sikes, '16E, sang two , so-
los. Charles Kendrick, '15, and Earl
B. McKinley, '16, furnished a lively
mandolin and piano number.

PICKMAULBETSCH
ON ALL-AMERICAN
New York ]Wagazine Gives Wolverine
Position at Fullback on
Famed Mythical
Eleven
HARVARD GETS THREE PLACES;
PRINCETON IS NEXT FAVORED
Hughitt, IReimann, and McHale Receive
Monorable Mention From
Sport Critics
Maulbetsch is the only Michigan man
to secure a place on Vanity Fair's All-
American team, as the "German Bul-
let" has been given the fullback posi-
tion by a majority of the sport writers,
who, submitted elevens to the editors
of the New York magazine.
Harvard is given three men on the
mythical team, and Princeton . two,
while one man is taken from Michigan,
Yale, Cornell; Army, Chicago and
Washington and Jefferson.
The fact, that the eleven chosen by
Vanity Fair is based on opinions sub-
mitted by prominent sporting writers
from all over the country, makes this
All-American team really representa-
tive, although Walter Camp's selection
is still regarded as the authentic team.
The other Wolverines to receive
honorable mention are. Reimann and
McHale in the line, and Hughitt in the
backfield. In commenting ,on Michi-
gan's quarterback, th New York writ-
er says "Hughitt. of Michigan, has been
more or less crippled and hardly up to
his true form even late in the. season."
In placing "Maully' in th backfield,
the writer says: ",For onew of the backs,
write in large letters the name of
Maulbetsh, Michigan's battering ram
-one of the old-fashioned line break-
ers. Although so small as to be almost
diminutive, he had no peer on any
team this year, having butted his way
133 yar'ds against Harvard, only to be
stopped in the shadow of the posts.
Against Pennsylvania's somewhat
weaker line, he was irresistible."'
The 1914 AllAmerican, as chosen
by Vanity Fair, is as follows: R. E.-
Hardwick, Harvard; R. T.-Ballin,
Princeton; R. G.-Pennock, Harvard;
C.-Des Jardien, Chicago; L. G.-
Shenk, Princeton; L. T.-Talbott,
Yale; L. E.--Merrill'at, Army; Q. B.-
Barrett, Cornell; L. H.-Spiegel, W.
and J.; F. B.-Maulbetsch, Michigan;
R. H.-Manan, Harvard.
I)ETROIT ALUMNI HONOR TEAM
AT ANNUAL FOOTBALL SMOKER
For the last time Michigan's gal-
lant fooball team of 1914 met to-
gether, when they appeared in the
Board of Commerce hall as, honor
guests at the big smoker given in
homage of them by the Detroit alum-
ni. The 'vening was marked by great
enthusiasm and spirit.
The speeches of Captain Raynsford,
'15E, and Captain-elect Cochran, '16P,
were received with loud applause.
Judge Murphin also spoke and was
greeted warmly by those present.
"Jim" Strasburg acted as toastmas-
ter, and C. B. Haff, '15L, led the
cheers. Movies of the Harvard and
Pennsylvania games were thrown on
a screen and created great approval.

MAJO R TRAVIS TO
LECTURE AT UNION
Sunday Affernoon Programs Open To.
day With Talk on "A Man
Without a Smile"
WILL PROVIDE REFRESHMENTS
Sunday programs of the Union be-
gin this afternoon with a lecture on
"A Man Without a Smile," by Major
DeHull N. Travis, of Flint. The pro-
grams which are intended to enliven
students' dull Sunday afternoons, will
continue through th3 year, and each
will be featured by speeches of noted
men, by refreshments, and by musical
numbers.
Major Travis, tomorrow's speaker, is
an expert on criminal law and also a
connoiseur of dramatic literature and
of the drama, having been an actor
himself. Beside being ex-president of
the Michigan state board of prisons, he
has acted ,n the Michigan state prison
board, and as secretary to Governor
Chase S. Osborn.
PLAN BAND OF 100
P I ECESNEXT YEAR
Movie Shois on Monday, Tuesday anfi
Wednesday Piet-are Big,
Contests

LAST
DR.

OPPORTUNITY TO HEAR
ALLEN ARTHUR STOCKDA

Conservation Banquet to Be Given I
Methodist Church, at 5:30
O'clock Tomorrow
"Mobilization Week" will come to
close with a mammo h mass meetin
at 3:30 o'clock this afternoon in Hi
auditorium, after four days of the mos
successful campaigns ever conducte
in any college or university in tb
country..
A last opportunity will be given un
versity students to hear Dr. Allen Ar
thur Stockdale, pastor of the Congre
gational church in Toledo, who i
known throughout this country as th
"Pitching Parson."
This final meeting of the campaig
will be thrown open to the public, an
as many church Eclubs, fraternities an
sororities are planning to attend e
masse, its expected by the mobilize
tion committee that Hill auditorim
will witness the largest religious gath
ering ever held in Ann Arbor. Tb
faculty of the university has also bee
invited to attend.
Paul C. Wagner, '16E, general chair
man of the mobilization committee
will preside at the meeting, whil
Frank A. Taber, of the school of mu

'WOBILIZATION IS
CONCLUDED TOO
Religious Campaign Will End in I
Mass Meeting Held in Hill
Auditorium This
Afternoon

MUSIGIANS

FEAT RE

PROGRAMI

Michigan's Varsity band will open
the series of moving picture exhibi-
tions, which will commence in Hill au-
ditorium tomorrow evening, and con-
tinue on Tuesday, and Wednesday ev-
enings.
These movie shows, the purpose of
which is to raise money with which to
defray the remaining expenses of the
band for the present season, will con-
sist of films picturing the Harvard4
trip and Cornell asd Pennsylvaniaa
games. Several other films, portray-4
ing various university activities, which4
have not been shown before, and also4
a new motion picture of President-4
Emeritus James B. Angell, will be dis-
played.
Among the pieces the band will play
is "That Michigan Band," 'which was
written recently by Cniarles D. Kountz,
'02L. All the royalties, which may bel
derived from the sale of the song,
have been turned over to the band by
Mr. Kountz, and he has also under-l
taken to secure an appropriation for
the Varsity band from the state legis--
lature.
If the imotion picture enterprise
proves successful, the band associa-
tion will be able to devote the pro-
ceeds from the next "Band Bounce,"
which the management is planning to
give some time in January, to enlarg-
ing and equipping the band for next
year. According to S. J. Hr -ter, man-
ager of the band, the <,anization
next year will number 65, and possi-
bly 100 musicians.
Three movie shows will be given
each evening, about one hour in length,
and starting at 7:00, 8:00, and 9:00
o'clock respectively. Performance will
be continuous, however, so that the
spectators may come at any time dur-
ing the evening. The dmission charge,
will be 10 cents.
SOPH ENGINEER SMOKER PLANS
ARE HNISHED BY CO MTTEE
Final arrangements, for the smok-
er to be given by the soph engineers
at the Union Tuesday night, have been
completed. Eats and smokes will be
furnished, and a program has been
arranged, featuring the "Alley Rat"
quartet, and a rendition by C. S. Lmb,
entitled, "A Right Smart Monclogue."
Tickets 'may be obtained fh om the

* TODAY'S MOBILIZATION.
te .----
* 8:30-Breakfast for all student
* workers: and,-visiting speakers,
* Newbrry hall.
* 10:30--Church services. Visit-
'Ing speakers wili participate.
* 12:00--Addresses before various
* church Bible classes.
* 1:00-Fraternities and sorori-
* ties entertain the visiting
* speakers.
* 3:30-Final mass meeting, for
* both men and women, Hill au-
* ditorium. Dr. Allen Arthur
*' Stockdale speaks.
* e * * * * * s* *. * * *
sic, will give some selections on t
pipe organ preceding Dr. StockdalE
address. Frank W. Grover, '18, of D
troit, will render some vocal sele
tions.: The entire body of 36 speake
will occupy the speaker's platform.
In the evening; at 7:30>.o'clock, "Da
(A.J.) Elliot, international secreta
of the Y. M. C. A. for colleges a
universities of the middle west, w
talk at the Presbyterian church
"Why Am I a Christian?" At noc
M. H. Bickham, of Chicago, will spe
to the university men's class of t
Presbyterian church. At the sar
hour, "Tom" Evans, who has char
of the Y. M. C. A. work at the UnivE
sity of Pennsylvania, will talk to I
university' men's class of the Meti
dist church.
"Heinie" (H. L.) Heinzman, of Ka
kakee, Ill., will speak to the univers
men's class of the Baptist church
12:00 o'clock, and Chester JEmersi
of Detroit, will talk to university s
dents at the Congregational church
10:30 o'clock.
In order to conserve the remarkal
effects which this campaign has pi
duced, the Students' Christian as
ciation has planned a "Conservati
Banquet" at 5:30 o'clock tomorr
night at the Methodist church. EvE
man, who wants to see a better "Mic
igan Spirit" in the.student body, is
vited to attend. A report of the resu
of "Mobilization Week" will be giv
by the chairman of the mobilizat
committee. At this meeting, a defh
program of social service, intended
last throughout the college year, a
(Continued on page 6)

*

Ii di

lOc

10C
The Varsity Band's Movie Show
Picturing, clearly and fully, the Harvard Trip,
Pennsylvania and Cornell Football Games, and
featured by a novel musical entertainment each
night will be given in
Hill Auditorium, Monday, Tuesday a n d Wednesday
nights. Three continuous performances-7:0O, 8:00
and 9:00 o'clock. Band plays Monday night.
. 00

lac

members of the social committee, or
the door, 2t 25 cents each.

at

r .

. ,-- -,

Grand
Final

LAST CHANCE TO HEAR

"What 'is

S CKD ALE

Michigan's
Spirit?"

Mobilization

Hill Auditorium

3:30 P. M.

Learn the Answer

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