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November 20, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-11-20

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E DAILY
Y MORNING
$2.5o

I

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Michigan

Daily

--- -- FANNON

W . w.___.

Vol. XXV, No. 46.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1914

TO PRIESENT FIRST
Enactment of "The Bracelet" in Sarah
Caswell Angell Hall Tonight
Marks New Venture
in Dramatics
DRAMA SETS FORTH DOMESTIC
TROUBLE OF OCCUPIED WOMAN
Character Study by Auto Chekoff, Will
Be Given As Complement To
Author of Skit

TODAY Baee,

Comedy club play, "The
Sarah Caswell Angell,
o'clock.
Wright Saxaphone Trio
Granger's, 9:00 o'clock.
Junior engineer smoker,
Union, 8:00 o'clock.

Bracelet,"
hall, 8:00
dance ati
Michigan

RICE MUSES ON THE CHANGE
OF FOOTBALL AT MICHIGAN
Th old ordeitebangeth!" Who pla d with us upon the team a
With the advent of "new style" foot- few short years ago.
ball has come the disappearance of
Michigan's famous old "point-a-min- I saw Yost coaching as of old-the
Cite" football teams. Weaker oppon- the same old Yost, it's true;,
tnts are able to make a better show- But not !the same old Buffaloes that
ing, both on offense and defense. wore the Maize and Blue..
It is no longer possible for a team And likr sothe wild tornado turned
to run up 644 points in a single sea- adrift upon. the foe
son, for an average of nearly 60 points They turned up sixty points a game
a game, as did the 1902 Michigan team. a few short years ago.
Nor has any team in the country ap-
proached the record of the 1901 Maize I saw the scrub team hold 'em Tom,
and Blu2 team which scored 550 and then my thoughts went back
points, and kept its goal line un- I saw the shade of Heston as he led

9:30-11:30 -Speakers' office
hours. For appointments call
887 for men, or 208 for wom-
en.
10:00-Dr. Peter Roberts speaks
to Prof. Charles E. Cooley's
class in sociology.
12:00-All men members of,
mobilization committee meet
for luncheon at Methodist
church. All women members
of the committee lunch at
Newberry hall.
Informal meetings at fraterni-
ties and sororities conducted
by the various speakers.
-2:00-4:00- Speakers' office

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*TODAY'S MOBILIZATION.
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3800 BY SPEAKER
raternities and Sororities Join
Raising Number of Different
Meetings to Total of
66 Yesterday
)CIA SERVICE' WORK WILL
BE CHIEF PROBLEM TONIGI
I Stori.dale, Dr. Roberts, Mr. J.
Lee, Mr. E. Riebel, and Mr. L.
C. Douglass on Program

With the presentation of the one act
playlet, "The Bracelet," by the Comedy
club this evening in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall, a new venture is being
made in campus dramatics. This pro-
duction will be the first of a series
of monthly performances which the
university Thespians have planned to
give throughout the scholastic year.
The doors will be open at 8:00 o'clock
this evening, and the price of admis-
sion is 10 cents.
It has been the purpose of the club
to hold such entertainments for some
years past, but it has never been suc-
cessfully carried out until the present
management took, command. Under
the direction of assistant-manager L.
M. Cunningham, '16L, a cast of about
ten students has been drilling ener-
getically on the short play to be given
tonight. The new material tried out
has proven of exceptional merit this
fall.
The play portrays the domestic
troubles of a woman, who was so oc-
cupied that she did not retain the af-
fection of her husband, with subse-
quent entanglements and situations,
both humorous and semi-tragic. Al-
fred Sutro, a Russian, wrote the skit.
A selection entitled, "The Swan
Song/' written by another Russian,
named Anto Chekoff, will be rendered
by L. M. Cunningham, '16L, and Nor-
man Wassman, '18, as a complement to
the author of the playlet. It is a
character study. Harold Forsythe, '17E,
will accompany the two actors=.on the
violin..-
The'lead roles n "The Bracelet" are
to be taken by Ruberta Woodworth,
'17, in the cast of Mrs. Westren, and
Morrison Wood, '17, depicting the
character of Harvey Westren. The
work of Rowena Bastian, '18, in the
part of the governess, Miss Farren,
has attracted attention.
Invitations have been sent the pat-
rons of the Comedy club for the en-
tertainment.

TOMORROW
Senior lit cabaret, Michigan Union,
2:30 o'clock.
Soph lit "Snowball Dance," Barbour
gymnasium, 2:00 o'clock.
Chess and Checker club, Michigan
Union, 7:30 o'clock.

FOOTBALL SMOKER BY DETROIT
ALUMNI TO CONCLUDE SEASON
Entire Gridiron Squad and Band Will
Be Present at Final Event
Tomorrow Night
Michigan's 1914 football season will
conclude oflicially tomorrow night at
8:00 o'clock, when the Detroit alumni
give the big annual football smoker
at the Detroit Board of Commerce.
Tickets for students at $1.00- a piece
are on sale at the Michigan Union and
at Huston Brothers.
The entire Varsity squad will be
present and also many former Wolver-
ine gridiron heroes. The varsity band
will play several selections. Michigan
songs, eats, smokes and speeches will
compose the rest of the program.
Those in charge of the affair hope to
make this year's smoker the biggest
event of this nature ever held in De-
troit. In former years the manage-
ment has been hampered by lack of
space but, owing to the size of the
Board of Commerce, a great many
more can be accommodated at tomor-
row's function than at any former
smoker.
WANT HOP RE[ VVE
Third Year Class Passes Resolution
Favoring Reinstatement of
Former Function

crossed.
The disappearance of the old steam
roller scoring machine has caused
Grantland Rice, sport writer and sport
poet, to write the following stanzas on
the difference between the old Michi-
gan teams and those of the later years:
I wandered to Ann Arbor, Ton, I went
the other day;
I made my way to Ferry field to see
the squad at play;
But non-; was there to greet me, Tom,
and gone was left to know

the old attack;
With Weeks and Longmant at his side
-'twas fifty yards or, so
Each time this old bunch had the ball
a few short years ago,
And then-like some rare vision loom-
ing faintly through the haze-
I saw the Wolverine machine of now
long-vanished days;
McGugin, Hammond, Reinschild, with
Sweeley. White and Snow-
I wish we'd had J. Harvard, Tom,
a few short years ago.

Here's One On
Tommy Atkins,
What has become of the English
flag? That is the question which is
now baffling members of the Cosmo-
politan club. And although the best
sleuths in the organization have been
warm on its trail for almost a week,
the whereatouts of Great Britain's na-
tional emblem has not been discover-
ed.
Several weeks ago the club pur-
chased a set of flags, including one for
each country represented in the club.
There were 26 pieces of beautiful
bunting. Yesterday when the flags
were 'unfolded to lend the university
authorities in preparation fQr the
reception to foreign students, 'the
British flag was conspicuous by its
absence. Consternation and dismay
were rife in the usually peaceful ranka
of the society.
Many there were who believed that
a conspiracy against the English- was
on foot, and that the the smouldering
fire of war and strife had been fanned
to flames. Exhaustive probing has not
yet revealed the leaders of this anti-
English sentiment. But hist! There{
are several clues. According to the
toreign hawkshaws. the culprits will
be apprehended in a very short time.
That punishment will be meted out to
them in no mild measures, is the pre-
diction of the officers of the Cosmopoli-
tan club, for sacred neutrality has
been violated.

250 Students Will Visit Factories at
Wyandotte, Sibley and
Detroit
SHOUTLID SFCURE TICKETS TODAY
More than 25t, students in Ch. E. I,
metallurgy Ch. E. 1A, and geology
courses 25A, 1A, and 1E, will leave
on a special train at 6:45 tomorrow
morning on a visiting tour of some of
,de leading factories and plants of De-
troit, and the lime quarries at Sibley..
The special will stop: at Ypsilanti to
pick up Normal students who are go-
ing on the trip.
Arriving at Wyandotte at 7:50
o'clock, those students preferring to
visit the Huron Portland cement comn-%
pany, at that place, will leave the
train, and those desiring to visit the
Sibley quarries will arrive -in Sibley'
at 8:00 o'clock. As both institutions
are to be visited at 8:00 o'clock, stu-
dents are requested to make their se-
lection between the two plants. The
train will leave Sibley at 9:30 o'clock,
stopping at Wyandotte at 9:40 o'clock
for those at the cement plant, and then
go on to Detroit, arriving there at
10:00 o'clock.
From the Michigan Central station
tihe visitors will go, by trolley, to the
Detroit Copper and Brass Rolling
Mills, and thence to the Solvay Pro-
cess company to inspect the coke ov-
ens, and fina ly to the Detroit Iron
and Steel company at 1 :45 o'clock.
To all engineering students signi-
fying their intention of going on the
tAp lunci will be served at 1:00"
o'clock, Saturday, by the Solvay Pro-
cess company at a charge, of 15 cents.
per person.
All who intend to make the trip
should buy tickets today from Prof. I.
D. Scott, Prof. W. H. Hobbs, Prof. E.
C. Case, Prof. E. E. Ware, or Prof. A.
E. White.

hours.
4:00 -Reception to the wives of
the members of the University
faculty, Newberry hall.
4:30-Conference of all varsity
athletes at Waterman gymna-
sium.
Mr. J. R. Lee, production man-
ager of Ford motor works,
speaks in University Hall.
5:30-Mr. J. R. Lee speaks at lit-
erary student class officers'
banquet, Newberry hall.
Dr. Peter Roberts, Fred H.
Rindge, Jr., and Richard H.
Edwards, speak at banquet of
social service committee, City
Y. M. C. A.
6: 00-informal talks by the va-
rious speakers at fraternities
and sororities.
7:00-Dr. A 11 en Stockdale
speaks at student mass meet-
ing, University hall.
Lloyd C. Douglass, Champaign,
Ill., speaks to women in New-
berry hall.
8:00-Special - conference de-
signed for all students who
desire to give some time to
volunteer social service work.
For men, University hall, for
women, Newberry hall.
Faculty conference, Alni Me-
morial hall.
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Thursday, the second day of the
"Mobilization Week" campaign, wit-
nessed C6 different meetings in which
more than 3,800 students listened to
the varioas speakers of the campaign.
Meetings were held at 40 fraternities
and at 10 sororities. Speakers inter-
viewed more than 150 men individual-
ly in 20 minute talks.
Today has been designated as "So-
cial Service Day." Six men, who are
specializing in social service work,
have made a survey of Ann Arbor and
will make public the results of their
research at the mass meeting at 7:00
o'clock tonight; in University hall.
They have prepared an elaborate
schedule whereby men and women
students interested in social service
work may gain valuable experience
while in coll.ge.
Dr. Allen Arthur Stockdale, pastor
of the Congregational church, Toledo,
will speak again at the mass meeting
tonight in University hall. Following
his talk, Dr. Peter Roberts, of New
York, head of the industrial work in
this country. and known as the father
of the whole industrial welfare move-
ment, will conduct a special confer-
ence for all students who desire to de-
vote some of their time to volunteer
social service work.
Richard H. Edwards, who has stud-
ied social problems in the leading col-
leges and universities of this country,
will also be present at this conference.
Mr. Edwards is author ,of a book enti-
tled "Amusements." He will take
charge of the social service work for
the remainder of the week, relieving
Mr. Fred H. Rindge, Jr., who will
leave for New York tomorrow.
(Continued on page 6)

CIVIC ASSOCIATION

Business Men of City Plan Banque
For Michigan's Football
Eleven
REGENT J. E. BEAL TO PRESIDE
Michigan's 1914 football team wil

t
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FRESHMAN LITS WILL U
ALL OLD CAMPUS TR

CAMPUS SOCIETIES TO

I -

ASSIST

ti
A

Following the example s
year's freshman class, tI
freshman lit et-ass in the
n+ -~ - - "--- '

WEBSTER SOCIETY TO DEBATE
AT WEELKLY MEETING TONIGHT
Webster society will hold its reg-
ular weekly meeting tonight at 7:30
o'clock. The program follows:
"ParliamEntary drill, "Resolved that
the J laws are champions of the cam-
pus." A debate will be given on the
question: "Resolved that Betting on
Intercollegiate Contests Is Detrimen-
tal to the Students and the Universi-
ty." A. Lepak, '17L, and S. Galer, '17L,
will argue for the affirmative, and R. S.
Munter, '16L, and R. E. Richardson
'16L, will argue for the negative.
There will be two speeches, one min-
ute long. W. M.. Strachan, '15L, will
speak on the subject, "Should 'Buy a
Bale of Cotton'b e Endorsed" and C. S.
Neithercut, '16L, will speak on, "Le-
gal Magazines and Their Worth."
Business will be taken up after the
program, at which time the amend-
ments to the constitution will be voted
upon, and a day of the week on which
to hold the regular meeting definitely
decided.

Junior engineers took the first of-
ficialaction for the revival of the jun-
ior hQp to the roll of Michigan's social
events, in their assembly yesterday.
The class passed a resolution stating
that it was in favor of a democratic
hop managed by the junior classes.
Several campus societies have also
signified their intention of joining for-
ces to bring back the big affair.
s The class authorized its social com-
mittee, of which R. C. Jeters is chair-
man, to do whatever it could to bring
back the function. Jeters said last
night that his committee would cor-
respond with students in other univer-
sities on the affair. The committee
intends drawing up a complete plan
to submit to the faculty.
Junior lits have not taken action as
yet in any class meeting, but George
McMahon, class president, has said
that he would bring the matter to the
attention of the class at the next meet-
ing.
Many honor societies on the campus
have declared themselves in support of
the project. Most of these have
chosen one of their number to rep-
resent them on a committee of all the
societies, which will consider ways and
means for bringing about the return
of the junior hop. The junior engi-
neers committee will meet this com-
mittee, and both will cooperate.
The junior hqp was abolished .by
the faculty two years ago. The im-
mediate occasion for this action was
(Continued on page 6)

11

ADVISE MEN TO STUDY RUSSIA
BECAUSE OF TRADE RELATIONS
Leonard B. Moiseyeff, '15E, who
spoke at the reception to foreign stu-
dents Friday night, has pointed out
ways and means through which the
United States may open new and prof-
itable trade relations with Russia, his
native country. He remarked on the
advisability of studying the Russian
language with a view to taking active.
part in the new commercial activities
between the two nations at the close
of the war.

be banqueted by the Ann Arbor Civic
Association at the armory on No m-
ber 30, according to plans announced
last night. Tickets are to go on sale
in a few days at State street stor, s,
and, as this is the first time the town
people have been given the oppor-
tunity to do honor to a Varsity team,
a large attendance is expected.
Regent Junius E. Beal will be the
toastmaster, and other prominent
Ann Arbor men will be secured to
give speeches at the gathering. This
banquet will be the occasion of the
final meeting of this year's Varsity,
and will furnish an opportunity for
the local people to show their pride
and loyalty to the Michigan team.
University students will be admit-
ted to the affair, although the ban-
quet is 'primarily for the people of
Ann Arbor, not in the university.

ed to uphold all the campus tr
and to punish all members of t
who infringe upon them.
The following committees w
pointed by president M. S. C
Social, T. F. McAllister, ci
Miss Genevieve Walsh, Miss
Wells, Miss Pauline Champli
Frieda McClellan, Miss Flore
Kay, J. L. Garvey, Lee Limber
Curtis, James Schermerhorn
Kocker, D. W. Shand; good Pel:
R. H. Bennett, chairman, G. H
J. F. Dunne, B. P. Pennemen
Loucks, A. E. Horne, H. G.
A. L. Kirkpatrick, L. K. Jame
Collins, Forrest Merrill, C. B.
C. Lutz, H. H. Colby, aid F. L.
D. B. McCruden, chairman, J.
ton, C. J. Seeley; finance, th
officers, and Miss Mary Tinam
The next meeting will be he
Monday in the economics bull
which time plans for the am
be held at the Michigan Uni
cemuber 3, will be discussed.

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TO SU'JSCRIBERS.
-0-
Unpaid subscriptions to The
Daily must be paid by Dec. 10,
$3.00 rate will be charged.
Save yourself 50 cents by pay-
ing now.
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WESLEVAN GUILD LECTURE
Editor of The Independent
"The Great War and Peace Movement"
Sad y November 22, 7:30 P. M.

Investigates Mountain Sheep Disease
Three bureaus of the United States
Department of Agriculture, biological
survey, animal industry, and forest
service, are now engaged in the in-
vestigation of a serious disease which
has broken out among Rocky Moun-
tain sheep and goats, and is reportedj
to be existing in the Lemhi national
forest of Idaho. A competent veterin-
arian has already been dispatched toj
Idaho to begin the work.

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TO SUBSCRIBER.
Unpaid subscriptions to The
Daily must be paid by Dec. 10,
$3.00 rate will be charged.
Save yourself 50 cents by pay-

METHODIST CHURC

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now.
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Men Mobilize

at University Hall

Women Mobilize
at Newberry Hall

7=8 P.M
TONIGHT

What Is

Michigan Spirit'

at 78 P.M
TO NIGHT

Stockdale Speaks

DOUGLAS SPEAKS

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