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November 17, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Daily

'N'

XXV, No. 43.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1914.

PRICE FIVE

IXTEEN MEN WILL
EAR MONOGRAMS

dfiff
TODAY
Union football smoker, Barbour gym-
nasium.

ALTER TRYOUTS OF'
VARSITY DEBATERS

HUGHITT RECEIVES
FOOTBALL TROPHY

A PROCLAMATION.

* * *I

All Players Appearing in Last Three
Games, Except Rehor and Huebel,
to Be Aiwarded "M's"
at Smoker
REWARD MEMBERS OF TEAM FOR
FAITHFULNESS AND SERVICES
Will Assemble at Noon Today to Elect
Captain For. Next Year and
to Take Picture
Michigan's football captain for next
season will be elected this noon when
the sixteen Varsity players who will
receive their "M" certificates tonight
will have the official picture taken.
The head coach, captain, trainer and
athletic director yesterday selected
the men who will be given their let-
ters, and the executive committee of
the board in control of athletics at
once ratified the choices, all of which'
were unanimous.
The list follows: Captain James
Raynsford, '15E, of Detroit; Earnest
F. Hughitt, '15E, of Escanaba; Frank
M. McHale, '16L, of Logansport, Ind.;
William D. Cochran, '16P, of Houghu
ton; Lewis C. Reimann, '16L, of Iron
River; Robert W. Watson, '18M, of
Ludington; Karl S. Staatz, '16M, of
Tacoma, Wash.; Leland H. Benton,
'16E, of Valparaiso, Ind.; John J. Ly-
ons, '16E, of Pittsburg; John Maul-
betsch, '17P, of Ann Arbor; Clyde E.
Bastian, '16, of Williamsport, Pa.; J.
Bland Catlett, '15, of BrookinW, S.
Dak.; Lawrence L. Splawn, of Dallas,f
Tex.; Thomas H. Bushnell, '15E, of
East Cleveland, O.; Maurice F. Dunne,
'17L, of Springfield, Ill.; and Efton M.!

Four

Literary Societies Each To
Six Candidates For First
Preliminary

Pick I Coaches

Choose Quarterback
Valuable Member of
1914 Eleven

as MostI

Deutscher Verein meets
rooms, 7:15 o'clock.

in societyI

WILL GRADUALLY ELIMINATE 181 RAYNSFORD RUNS CLOSE SECOND

Prof. E. H. Kraus, on "American Min-
erals and the War," mineralogy lec-
ture room, 4:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
"Mobilization Week" begins, Universi-
ty Hall, 7:00 o'clock.
Commerce club smoker, Michigan Un-
ion, 7:00 o'clock.
FINDS BODY OF J. E. LOUGHRY,
GRADUATE ENGINEER, IN RIVER
Word has been received -from Frank
A. Walton, 13E, Warsaw, Ill.,' of the
death by drowning of J. E. Loughry,
'10E, inspector of the hydraulic dredge,
"Geyser," located at Milan, Ill., under
the Mississippi river commission. The
accident, which took place in the Ga-!
lena river, near Warsaw, Ill., was not
witnessed by anyone and was not
known until the body was found.
Loughry entered the government ser-
vice in October, 1906, and was trans-
ferred to Milan in July, 1911.
GIGANTIC PROJEC T
BGNS TOM ORROW'
Mobilization to Be Officially Launched1
With Committee of 350 Men
and Many Outside
Speakers

Announcement was made, last night,
of a change in the method of holding
tryouts for places on the Varsity De-
bating team, which is to take part in
the Mid-West debate on March 22. Each
of the four literary societies will sel-
ect six men in the preliminaries held
before December 15, which will be put
in charge of the Oratory department.
This squad of 24 men will be given
hearings before a committee coin-
posed of the faculty of oratory and
others selected for the purpose, and
gradually eliminated until six men are
finally chosen to represent the uni-
versity. This new arrangement gives
each society six men from which the
final choice is made instead of three
as formerly. In addition the tryouts
will be given more chances for prac-
tice and experience in speaking before
the oratorical committee.
Any one who may wish to try out
for this team may do so through the
literary societies, or by arrangement
with the faculty of the Oratory de-
partment. All students are eligible,
subject to the general eligibility rules
of the university,
This is the first year that Michigan
will compete in the Mid-West League
which was organized last spring. An-
nual contests have been held with
Wisconsin for the past five years but,
under the new arrangement this is
the first year that Michigan will meet
Illinois on the platform, and every
possible effort is being put forth to
develop a winning team for this initial
contest.
The debate will be held on the night
of March 26. Illinois will contend
with Michigan in Ann Arbor at Uni-
versity Hall, and the other MAchiga
team will meet Wisconsin at Madison,
on the same date.

"Tommy" Hughitt has been award-
ed the the Heston-Schulz trophy as the
most valuable player to the Michigan
football team this season. The cup is
annually awarded by Huston Brothers'
to the player selected by the head
coach, first assistant coach, and train-
er of the Michigan team; each of these
voting for four players in the order of
their.worth to the team.
The result of yesterday's vote was
as follows: Hughitt, 5; Raynsford, 6;
Maulbetsch, 7; Cochran, 12. Accord-
ingly, Hughitt was the first choice of

"In all the years since 1876,
there has been no greater reason
for giving thanks to Almighty
God than in this year 1914. The
United States is at peace with
all the nations of the earth. The
stars and stripes symbolize to
all the world, "life, liberty and
pursuit of happiness." Sunshine,
rain and toil have given us an
abundance of the good things
of life. Our glorious nation has
gone forward unswervingly to-
ward the goal of civic justice
and civic righteousness. We, the
people of Michigan, are happy in
joining every other state in ret-
erent and hearty thanksgiving.
"Therefore, I, Woodbridge N.
Ferris, Governor of the State of
Michigan, do hereby join the'
President of the United States in
designating Thursday, the 26th
of November,.as the day for all
people of this commonwealth to
celebrate in thanksgiving and
prayer."
WOODBRIDGE N. FERRIS,
Governor.
by Frederick C. Martindale, Sec-
retary of State.
_-.-
Classes will be held through-
out the university, Wednesday,
November 25, and will resume,
Friday, November 27.
* * * * * * * * * * *

MICHIGAN TEAM
BE FETEDTONI
Team to Make Last Public A
ance; Faculty Members, Ah
and Students WHIl Give
Speeches
YOST STAYS OVER FOR SMW
AND MAY ADDRESS GATH
Nearly Entire Number of Ticke
Sold; Remainder on Sale
at Union

two of thejudges, and received one
third place; Raynsford was the-unan-
imous second choice; Maulbetsch had
one first and two thirds; and Cochran
received three fourths.
In announcing the vote, the judges
made clear the rules which governed,
their votes. The trophy is not intend-
ed for the most brilliant individual
player, necessarily, nor for the biggestj
ground gainer, as this would give no'
lineman a possibility of winning the.
cup. The purpose is to honor, the man
who has been' of the most service to
his team, not only on. the 'field of bat-
tle, but in faithfulness in practice, and
even off the field by his example and
aid to the other members of the team.
"Si" Huston, '03D, and Roscoe B.
Huston, '02-'04L, are the donors of the
trophy, which was won last year by
James Craig, with Hughitt second
choice, It is named the Heston-Schulz
trophy in honor of the two Michigan
players who made Walter Camp's All-
Time All-American eleven.1
1915 LAWS AND 1816'_LITS TO
BATTLE FOR CLASS NUMERALSl
Football Teams Clash on Ferry Field
to Decide Which Shall Gain 9
Insignia

*
*
*
*
*

The awards were not made upon the
basis of participation in 'any particu-
lar game or games, as there has nev-
er been a set rule for awarding the
Varsity letters. In the past,, men who
have played as substitutes in the bigj
games have several times not been on
the monogram list; while occasionally
players who have 'not participated in
the important games have been given
letters.
The awards are made on the basis
of service to the team. Faithfulness in
practices, and spirit on and off the
field are all considered. The athletic
authorities aim to make the "M" mean
as much as possible, and to stand for
something more than the mere chance
of getting into a "big" game because a
regular is injured.
Of the men who receive letters this
fall, all but James were in the Cornell
or Pennsylvania game. The veteran
end played against Harvard, and in
most of the early season games. Hue-
bel was in the Pennsylvania game for
a few minutes, but was in neither the
Harvard or Cornell games, and was
not on the list. Rehor, another soph-
omore, was in the Harvard game for
a short time, but not in either of the
last two games, and did not get his
insignia. With these two exceptions,:
however, 'all of the players in the.
last three games were given their let-
ters.
PEACE CONTEST STIRS INTEREST
Many Orations Submitted; All Must
Be In By December 4.
All orations for the Peace Contest
must be handed in by December 4, to
either Prof. T. E. Trueblood or Prof.'
H. D. T. Hollister, of the oratory de-
partment. Much interest is being
shown in this contest this year. An-
nouncement was made last night that
there had never been so many ora-
tions submitted for this contest before,
and that the prospects of winning
first place this year are favorable to
Michigan.
Tryouts for the Peace Contest will
eb held on December 11 and 12, at!
which time there will be five men
selected to compete in the final try-
out on December 21,

234 GATHERINGS WILL BE HELD,
DURING LA TER PART OF WEEK
General Mass Meeting to Be Staged in
University Hall Each Night
at 7:00 O'clock
"Mobilization Week," the first proj-
ect of its kind ever held at Michigan,
during which a mammoth university
religious and social service campaign
will take place, will be opened by the
Students' Christian Association tomor-
row morning.
University students will be "mobil-
ized" under the leadei'ship of over 350
student and faculty workers in 284 gen-
eral and departmental meetings. Gath-
erings will be held in the differnt de-
partmental buildings, in the fraterni-
ty and sorority houses, and in Hill au-
ditorium. The association has secur-
ed 36 speakers to take charge of the
work.
Varied each day with slight changes,
the daily schedule for the week will
be as follows: At 8:00 o'clock there
will be breakfast for all the speakers,
followed by a conference of the speak--
ers and leaders at 8:45 o'clock. From
9:30 to 11:30 o'clock the speakers will
have personal interviews with the stu-
dents and will visit the various class-
es of the university. At noon there
will be informal meetings in the fra-
ternity and sorority houses, together
with a luncheon- for all student work-.
ers in Newberry hall.
In the afternoon, from 2:00 to 4:00
o'clock the speakers will be engaged
in personal interviews and in visiting
classes. From 4:30 to 5:30 o'clock
there will be a reception for foreign
students, a conference with varsity.
athletes and a social hour for the lead-
ers and student workers. At 5:30
o'clock there will be informal meet-
ings at the fraternities -and sororities.
In the evening, from 7:00 to 8:00
o'clock, a general mass meeting will
be held in Tniversity Hall for the men
students ri the university, and, at the
same- time, a meeting of the women
(Continued on Page 4).

SHOW SUPERIORlTY"
Statisties Prove Michigan Better Than
Competitors in All Lines of
Athletics
TO APPEAR AT SMOKER TONIGHT
Brimming over with live statistics,
the Michigan Athletic Annual will go
on sale this evening at the Union foot-
ball smoker, in the gymnasiums. Al-
most every conceivable point regard-
ing athletics at Michigan is explained'
in the booklet, 2,500 copies 'of which
are being printed for immediate distri-
bution.
Besides containing the scores of
practically every athletic contest'" in

Michigan men will be given
more chance to cheer for their
gridiron heroes, and to show their
preciation of the uphill fight the t4
made this year. This chance is
Union football smoker to be-held in
combined gymnasiums at 8:00 o'cl
this evening.
Tickets for the entertainment wi
at the last minute limited to 1,500, s
eral hundred less than'last year,
will be on sale at the Union desk
day and at the gymnasium door in'
evening, provided the few remain
passports are not sold out by t
time. The charge is 25 cents.
Prof. R. W. Aigler, assistant chi
man of the board in control, v
award the "M" insignias instead
Professor A. S. Whitney as previou
announced.
Head Coach Fielding H. Lost 1
finally consented to be present a
possibly will give a short talk. S
phen Farrell, track coach, also will
there, as will Assistant Coach Sch
and Reserve Coach Cole.
As the captain for the season 11
will be elected at the time of tak:
the football picture today, the capta
elect will probably be called on fo:
brief speech.
All preparations are complete
the occasion and the numbers on t
program have been selected. The fi
number will be a selection by the V
sity band; the second number will
an address by H. B. Carpenter,
'17L, representing the student bod
third, a selection by the combined ?r
sical clubs; fourth, an address
Prof. Robert E. Bunker, of the law
partment, in behalf of the faculty;
fifth number will be a selection by t
"Rag Pickers"; sixth, an address
James Schermerhorn, editor of t
Detroit Times; popular songs by t
Midnight Sons' quartette will cons
tute the seventh number; the eigl
number will be an address by Fran
D. Eaman, '01L, for the alumni; nir
will be the awarding of "M'c" by P
fessor Aigler; and the program will
concluded by singing the "Yellow 'a
Blue."
Committeemen for the smoker are
report r at the 'gymnasium whene'
possible during the day to aid in
rangements.

FOOTBALL TEAM WILL ATTEND
SMOKER IN DETROIT SATURDAY
)fay Secure Tickets For Big Affair at
Huston Brothers, or at
Union Desk
Michigan's 1914 gridders, together
with their admirers, both student and
alumni, will assemble at the Detroit
Board of Commerce, Saturday night
at 8:00 o'clock for the big annual foot-
ball smoker, given by the Detroit
alumni.
Tickets for the affair are selling for
$1.00 and may be obtained either at
the Michigan Union or at Huston
Brothers. Those in charge advise that
all expecting to attend should pur-
chase tickets in Ann Arbor as there
will probably be some difficulty in ob-
taining them in Detroit, Saturday.
An invitation has - been tendered all
members of th'e varsity squad together
with the coaches, trainers and man-
agers, an'd most of them will probably
be called upon for short talks. The
'band will be present to assist with the
jollification and the management plans
to make it the biggest football smoker
ever held in Detroit.
RHETORIC DEPARTMENT ADOPTS
NEW COUSE IN BOOK REVIEWS
L. L. Bryson of the rhetoric depart-
ment is giving a course in literary
criticism from a practical journalistic
viewpoint. It is known as course, 12,
and consists in having the students
review books for the Michigan Alum-
nus,' The Michigan Daily, and the lit-
erary page of the Detroit Tribune. By
thus having their work printed, the
students are given the advantage of
seeing their criticism in print and of
hav~ing it criticised by newspaper men
in accordance with their own ideas.

Possession of the fourth set of num-
erals for class football rests Detween
the senior laws and the junior lits,
who will meet at 4:00 o'clock this af-
ternoon on south Ferry field to settle
'the argument.
The senior laws have suffered two
defeats in the final round, one at the
hands of the soph lits, and one by the
fresh engineers, to whom they were
forced to default. The laws were put
into the first round by their defeat of
the senior engineer team. Three games
were played between these two teams,
the first two being scoreless ties, and
the third being won by the laws on a
field goal. .
The junior lits have been defeated
but once, that time by the junior laws,
and they have beaten the senior engi-
neers in a 27 to 7 game. With the lits
working at this rate, the laws will
meet one of the strongest teams in
the series, and will have only added
experience to -their advantage. In
view of the comparative showings of
the teams, the odds are distinctly in
the favor of the lits.
Marauders Plunder Several Dwellings
Petty thieves have been pursuing
their calling unrestrained in Ann Ar-
bor recently, according to reports
from several student rooming and fra-
ternity houses. The thieves seem to
have purposely overlooked valuables,
taking small articles instead. Spec-
tacles, shoes, small amounts of cur-
rency, and a mackinaw have disap-
peared. Goods have -been removed
from one house for the third time.
The local police say that none of these
cases have been reported at headquar-
ters.

which a Michigan team ever competed,
the annual includes an alphabetical
list of Michigan's competitors, with,
relative standings. By reference to
this table, it is possible to prove with-
out delay the all-time superiority of
the Maize and Blue. This feature is
expected to make the book especially
popular for out-of-town circulation.
Yost's All-Time Michigan football
eleven, upon which "Jimmie" Craig
has just been placed, is printed exclu-
sively in the annual, along with a sec-
ond team which is said to include two
members of the 1914 Varsity, and two
men who played last year. Cuts of
football stars and athletic coaches and
authorities are among the contents.
Eligibility rules, regulations for the
award 'of insignia and rules for class
competition are included under the
portion of the book devoted to the or-
ganization of the athletic association.
The annual's first pages are given ov-
er to a brief history of athletics at-
Michigan, by Floyd A. Rowe, and a
short biography of Coach Yost, by F.
M. Church, grad.
A list of all wearers of the "M" is
published, the names being arranged
in alphabetical order. The book con-
cludes with a history of the work done
by the intramural department during
its first year of activity.
The annual, which sells for 25 cents
a copy, will go on sale at the book-
stores tomorrow morning, after the
preliminary distribution at tonight's,
smoker. It is believed that the limit-
ed edition will be exhausted in a short
time.

REWARD THIRTY PLAYERS FOR
.. WORKING ON RESERVE SQUAD
Football men; to the number of 30
were awarded their "R's" yesterda:
as a reward for their work on th
Varsify and Reserve squads. The ur
usually strenuous season accounts fc
the large number given out this fal
The list of players follows: Robert F
Kohr, '17E; Clarence 0. Skinner, '17E
John McNamara, '17; Walter A. N'
mann, '17; Carl M. Graven, '17; Eg
mont Hildner, lit; ' Floyd C. Morse
'15E; John K. Norton, '16E; Fred I
Rehor, '17P; F. C. Millard, '16L
Frank D. Quail, '17L; Harold M. Zei
ger, '17; Robert R. Huebel, '16P; Law
rence S. Roehm, '16; Donald A. Fink-
beiner, '17; James L. Whalen, '17E
Anthony Burney, '17; Ferdinand C
Dratz, '16D; Donald H. James, '17
'Eugene S. Cohn, '15L; Harry L. Cal
vin, '17; Guy M. Wells, '16; Wilbur E
Davidson, '15; Edward J. De Pree
'15E; James M. Campbell,x'17; Samue
Cohen, '17E; Howard M. Warner, '16
W. 0. R.. Johnson, '17; E. W. Mille
'15E; and Cecil F. Cross, '17.

DO YOU KNOW THAT MICHIGAN'S ALL-TIME ATHLETIC RECORD IS UNEQUALED?
IT'S PROVED FOR YOU IN

ICHIGA

AT HLETIC

A

UA

25c

"Everything About Michigan Athletics "
OUT TONIGHT, AND 'ON SALE AT THE UNION FOOT BALL SMOKER

25c

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