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November 12, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-11-12

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THE DAILY
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XXV, No. 39.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1914.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

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YOSTMEN RECEIVE
STRENUOUS DRILL
First Team Kept Hard at Work Until
Darkness Stops Practice;
Scrubs Given Easy
Workout
r
ALL EXCEPT TWO OF REGULAR
PLAYERS IN OWN, POSITIONS
Due to Failure of Drop Kicks in Penn
Game, Splawn Practices Some
Placement Work
Yost gave the Varsity its most stern-
uous workout of the week last night,
keeping his first string men hard at
work on Ferry field, until it was im-
possible to see the ball. The-drill con-
sisted entirely of signal practice, the
scrubs getting off with a short turn at
the easy work, after which they were
excused for the day, and all of the
coaches centered their attention on
the Varsity formations.
Maulbetsch and Catlett were not out,
being busy on the campus, but every
other regular was on the field. Bastian
was at right half, with Roehm at left,
Splawn and Hughitt being in their
regular positions. Staatz and Benton
appeared at the ends,. and the line was
the same as was used last night.
"Larry" Splawn spent a good deal
of time in practicing goals from place-
me'sn, and, it is evident that Yost has
decided to change the style of his ae-
rial attack, following the showing
made in the Pennsylvania contest.
Splawn failed to drop-kick. goals twice
against the Quakers, and Yost believes
that the placement style will prove
much more effective against Cornell.
The Reserves had to run through
signal practice to keep from freezing
to death, Dunne, Hildner, Bushnell
and Zieger appearing in the backfield
on this squad. Both teams used for-
,ward passes almost altogether, Splawn
hairlingout most of the tosses for the
first string.
Lyons has again been shifted, and
is now a fullback. The former end
played a flank in the early games,
halfback in the Syracuse and Harvard
games, and end again against Penn-
sylvania. Splawn will start the game,
however.
SEEN SCRIBBLERS INITIATED
INTO SGMA DELTA CHI RANKS
Sigma Delta Chi, national journalis-
tic fraternity, held its local initiation
yesterday afternoon., The following
men were selected for membership:
James M. Barrett, '16, Sherwood W.
Field, '15, Harold R. Schradzki, '15L,
Edward P. Wright, '16, James L. Ked-
die, grad., Donald A. Smith, '16E,
Charles L. Kendrick, '15.
Many Tickets For Discount Dance Sold
Tickets for the Discount dance to
be given at Michigan Union from 9:00
to 1:00 o'clockonthe night before
the Cornell game, are receiving rapid
sale at the Union counter. Tickets
for the dance to be given at Barbour
gymnasium from 9:00 to 12:00 o'clock
Saturday night after the Cornell game
will be placed on sale at the Union
desk after 5:00 o'clock this afternoon.
ERNEST BAILEY HELPS CLEAR
JOE REINGER LETTER CASE
Ernest Bailey, a brother of Harold
Bailey, the easterner to whom Joe
Reinfer sent the letter about "fixing"
the Cornell game, declared that the

whole matter looked like a frame-up
to him, in a statement made yester-
day.
Ernest Bailey said farther that his
brother is a Harvard graduate, and at
the present time a traveling man, hav-
ing stopped at Ann Arbor and played
in "Joe's" billiard room during his
travels. He believes that it was then
that Joe received the impression that
Harold was a professional gamblers

TODAY
Glee and Mandolin clubs' concert, Hill
auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Phoenix club dinner, Michigan Union,
6:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Cornell "pep" meeting, Hill auditori-
um, 7:30 o'clock.
Reception to all foreign students, Bar-
bour gymnasium, 8:30 o'clock.
Prescott club lecture, room 165 chem-
istry club building, '2:00 o'clock.
Discountdance, Michigan Union, 9:00
o'clock.
DTM MAIY SUPPORTERS
Alumni Rooters From Nearby Cities
Help Swell Ranks of Those
Accompanying Team
SQUAD IN PINK OF CONDITION
(Special to The Michigan Daily.)
ITHACA, N. Y., Nov. 11.-Prepara-
tions are completed for the sendoff of
the team tomorrow, and campus in-
terest is at fever heat over the game
with Michigan on Saturday. A large
number of rooters have already signi-
fied their intention of accompanying
the team to Ann Arbor, and delega-
tions of alumni rooters from Chicago,
Toledo, Cleveland and Detroit will in-
sure plenty of support for the big red
team, when it faces Yost's warriors
on Ferry field Saturday. -.
Coach Sharpe will take an experi-
enced teamwith him when he leaves
for Ann Arbor tomorrow, and this
fact is expected to more. than off-set
the individual strength of Maulbetch,
the Michigan idol. The Cornell root-
ers are placing their confidence in
Barrett, and if the Maize and Blue
men prove victorious on Saturday,they
will have to show a better brand of
ball, than they have displayed yet this
year.
With all of the regulars, but one,
in the best possible condition, the Cor-
nell coaches will have no excuse to
offer in the case of a defeat, although
the contest with the Wolverines is not
considered of so much importance as
the battle with the Quakers, that is to
wind up the season for the Ithaca
eleven.
FACULTY TO ENTERTAIN MANY
FOREIGN STUDENTS TOMORROW
Flags of many lands will bedeck
Barbour gym tomorrow evening for
the reception, to be given to foreign
students by President Harry B. Hut-
chins and the deans of the depart-
ments. It is the wish of the authori-
ties that the affair be informal.
Arrangements have been made to
conclude the Cornell mass meeting by
8:15 o'clock, in order that the foreign
students may attend both meetings.
The reception will begin shortly after
that time.
Columbia To Witness Football Scrap!
Columbia is agog, for on Thanks-
giving day the students of this uni-

versity will see the first football game
played there in nine years.
Since the abolition of intercollegiate
competition, through a mis-under-;
standing no class games or inter-
fraternity contests have been sched-
uled. Just recently it was discovered
that such contests were permitted, and
on Turkey day the freshmen and+
sophomores are billed to appear
against each other.

DISTRIBUTE "PEP"
SESSIONTICKETS
Cornell Mass Meeting Will Probably-
Have Congressman Denby
as Speaker

WOMEN TO DEBATE
VOCATIONAL TASKS

Positions, Other Than Teaching,
Be Discussed in Ann Arbor
January 7, 8 and 9

Will

"1W" CLUB TO ATTEND IN BODY JUDITH GINSBURG, '15, CHAIRMAN

Tickets for the.Cornell mass meet-
ing, to be held at 7:30 o'clock tomor-
row night in Hill auditorium, will be
distributed from 1:00 o'clock to 5:30
o'clock this afternoon and all day to-
morrow, in front of the Michigan Un-
ion.' The ticket committee, composed
of John Leonard, '16L, and W. B. Pal-.
mer, '15, declares that positively no
one will be admitted to the big as-
sembly, except on presentation of
tickets. Persons wishing tickets, will
be required to show their athletic cou-
pon books at the Union. Seats in the
balcony will be reserved for
women until 4:00 o'clock tomorrow af-
ternoon.
Speakers for the meeting have not
been definitely secured as yet, but the
program committee announces that
it is practically. certain that Congress-
man Edwin Denby, '96L, will talk. On-
ly two other men will speak, so that
the meeting may be concluded as early
as possible.
Secretary Wilfred Shaw, of the
alumni association, is in possesion of
500 tickets for alumni and faculty
men. Plans have been made, to have
the returning members of the "M" club
attend in a body, as they did at the
Pennsylvania mass meeting.'
STUDENT COUNCIL TAKES NO
ACTION ON SOPH MEDIC CLASS
Members of the student council did
not take action on the soph medics,
at Tuesday's meeting, because they be-
lieve that the class will take steps to
settle the dispute at a class meeting
tomorrow.
The council decided that M. S. Col-
leton and Helen Hayes have been
elected president and vice-president,
respectively, of the fresh lit class. The
re-election held by the class last week
did not give either of these a majority,
but the council awarded the office be-
cause of pluralities.
Riemersnta Badly Burned at His Room
John J. Riemersnia, grad, was se-
verely burned about the hands, when
he attempted to put out a fire in his
room at 445 E. University, at 11:00
o'clock yesterday morning. Riemers-
nia was taken to the university health
service office, where physicians treat-
ed the burns.
The origin of the fire is doubtful, but
it is believed that a cigarette, careless-
ly tossed in the waste-basket by his
room-mate, was responsible for the
blaze. The fire did not damage any
of thle furnishings of the room.

To arouse the interest of college
women in pursuits other than teach-
ing, a women's vocational conferenhe
will be held in Ann Arbor on January
7, 8 and 9. Judith Ginsburg, '15, is
general chairman, with Dean Myra B.
Jordan, Dr. Elsie S. Pratt, Mrs. Ar-
thur G. Hall and Jane Cochran the fac-
ulty members of her committee.
Helen Bennett, of the Chicago branch
of the Collegiate Bureau of Occupation,
will open the conference.. 'Experts in
various fields are being corresponded
with, but a definite list of speakers has
not yet been arranged.
Women from the Michigan State
Normal college, at Ypsilanti, have
been invited to attend, and invitations
will be sent to representatives of va-
rious women's organizations through-'
out the state.
The vocations to be explained and
discussed were determined by a vote,
taken among university women. They
include social service, library work,
secretarial pursuits, civil service, bus-
iness administration, actuarial work,
home architecture and house econom-
ics. Other subjects, which were asked
for, will be dealt with in some man-
ner.
The organization of a university vo-
cational bureau is to be considered.
A committee, of which Marjorie Dela-
van, '15, is chairman, is at present at
work on the compilation of a card
catalogue of women in the state, who-
are engaged in occupations other than
teaching, and who will correspond
with university women. Helen Brown,
'14, isc hairman of a committee, mak-
ing out bibliographies on the voca-
tious, and collecting information in re-
gard to vocational schools.
GARGOYLE WILL BURST FORTH
ON MORNING OF BIG TUSSLE
Spectacles of all varieties, as view-
ed by the Gargoyle humorists and art-
ists, will greet the crowds, drawn to
Ann Arbor for the Cornell game. The
magazine will be on sale at the rdgu-
lar news stands, bookstores, and on
the streets. The issue will be featured
by "The Letters of a Substitute Half-
back," a humorous tale of the inside
dope on Yost, the team, and the Har-
Yard game.
Art work by Clark Smith, '1A, Allan
Honey, '17D, and someone who signs
himself "D. T. H.," but whose identity
is unknown to the managing editor of
the Gargoyle, will feature the coming
issue.

DEMANDS FOR CORNELL 6-,VE
TICKETS SHOW BIG INCREASE
Demands for tickets to the Michigan-
Cornell football game continue to pour
into the athletic association offices, the
last three days recording the largest
outside demand yet. In the neighbor-
hood of 13,000 tickets have been dis-
posed of up to the present time.
There are still sevetal thousand de-
sirable tickets procurable, and the
athletic association authorities expect
a large rush for them, during the re-
mainder of the week.
Briggs Stars in "Girl of My Dreams"
Harland Briggs, '02L, who introduc-
ed the "Michigan Drinking Song,"
written by C. D. Kountz, '02L, as a so-
loist in the 1901 Glee club, will appear
in a leading role in the "Girl of Mly
Dreams" company, which comes to the
Whitney theater tonight.'
EAST AND WEST TO ,
SINIG SIDE -BY SID

UMUSICAL CLUBS TO
MAKEDEBUT TODAY
Atproxuuately 7 I Men Will Mtarch on
Hill Auditorium Stage, When
First Number Statrts at
8:00 O'clock
HAROLD L. NITTiNG PRESENTS
NUMBER OF IMPERSONATIONS

Pasteboards Nearly Disposed of, But
Feis May Be ObtatiNdThis
A fternoon
In preparation for t:,ir ' debut
before the local public at 8:00
o'clock this evening, the Glee and Man-
dolin clubs rehearsed tonight's en-
tertainment in Hill auditorium, yester-
day.
Conducted by Kenneth ,Westerman,
'14,- and E. V. Moore, '12, all the rough
places in the program were straight-
ened out, and both clubs put in ex-
cellent trim for their appearance to-
night. Approximately 75 men will
march onto the stage in Hill auditori-
um when the performance starts at
8:00 o'clock.
Tickets are nearly all exhausted. A

Combined
and

Musical Clubs of Michigan
Harvard to Perform
January 2

PRESENT CONCERT IN DETROIT
Michigan's combined musical clubs
will hold a joint concert 'withthe i
Harvard clubs in the Board of Com-
merce hall in Detroit, on the evening
of January 2. Attempts of the mana-
gers of the two organizations to ar-
range the concert were rendered suc-
cessful by the aid of the Detroit alum-
ni of the two universities.
Harvard's musical organization is
planning a tour of the western states
during the holidays, and the concert
with the Michigan clubs will take
place on their return trip. Last year,
the Univepsity of California glee club
appeared In Hill auditorium for a sim-
lar combined concert, and the west-
erners were greeted with a capacity
house. Relations with the western in-
stitution were strengthened by this
cooperation, and the same result is
expected of the concert planned with
the Harvard musicians.
While the Cambridge men-are in
the west the Michigan clubs are plan-
ning to take a trip through the east
during the Christmas holidays, the
two organizations returning to Detroit
in time for the combined concert. De-.
tails for the Detroit entertainment
have not yet been completed.
CORNELL ALUMNI IN CHICAGO
PLAN SPECIAL CAR TO GAMEt
Chicago alumni association of Cor-
nell University is planning a big smo-
ker and special car to Ann Ar' or for1
the game on Saturday, while all^ mem-
bers who areunable to make the trip
will hold a joint smoker for Cornell
and Michigan men at Chicago Univer-
sity club, where a special wire will
bring play-by-play reports from Ferry
field.
A rally will be held at the Grand
Pacific Hotel this noon to rouse en-
thusiasm for the big game. The Cor-
nell special will leave Chicago late
Friday night, and will arrive in Ann
Arbor early Saturday morning.
Now Weaker Can Score More Heavily1
"New football" has increased the,
scoring facilities of the weaker.
elevens. This statement is borne out'
by a study of the records of the bigt
elevens of the country. In the east
there is not a single team of any im-
portance whatsoever, that has not had
its goal line crossed. Twenty-eightt
points have been scored against Har-t
vard, 29 against Yale, 56 against
Princeton, 29 against Cornell, 561
against Pennsylvania, and 25 against
Dartmouth. In days gone by, it wasf
customary for some of the bigger'
elevens to go through an entire season
without having a single point scored t
against them.

JUST

AS A LITTLE REMINDER----

Blood is thicker than water, but
that's not saying anything about the
rivalry occasioned by a game such as
was played in the Harvard stadium on
the last day of last month. That "the
East is East, and West is West and
never the twain shall meet" has been
said in another connection but that it
applies as well to the present inter-
collegiate situation is illustrated by
a letter received by Dr. Reuben Peter-
son, director of the University hospital,
and a graduate of Harvard, from his
son, Reuben Peterson, Jr., '14, who is
studying journalism at Columbia Uni-
versity, and who witnessed the Har-
vard game, two weeks ago. The letter
says:
"I don't like to rub it in, but I am
handing it to you as I was forced to
hand it to other Cambridge men who
were convinced that Michigan was
destined to be ground to a pulp just
because they were playing "Fat-h Ha'-
va'd." It was the New York Tribune,

which said that the score should have
been 14 to 0 in favor of Michigan. I
would have given anything to have
had you sitting next to me so I could
have roasted you and heard you yell
as little "Johnny" Maulbetsch crump-
led that much' touted line like paper.
What will stand out in my memory of
that game longer ┬░than anything else
is the surprised and rather hurt ex-
pression that came over the faces of
the eastern rooters and players as
they watched the Harvard team go
back--back-back before just one
man. -
"We gained 200 yards to their 150;
we made 10 first downs to their seven;,
our old friend John Maulbetsch gained
more ground than the three Harvard
backs put together and finally we ac-
tually outcheered your, Alma Mater.
If you really didn't want to come be-
cause you didn't want to see Michigan
snowed under, you made the biggst
mistake of your life."

H L. NUTTING
Manager of the Comedy Club, who will
.sing tonight.
few will be reserod to sell at the
auditorium in the evening just be-
fore the concert. They will be on
sale all afternoon at the auditorium.
A "new feature in the program will
be some impersonations by Harold L.
Nutting, '15L, manager of the Comedy
club. Among these are "The Country
Cousin," "Danny," and "A Liztown
Humorist.
The doors are to be opened at 7:00
o'clock this evening to a crow?. which
the management calculates will be
about 4,000.
BOAT CLUB STARTS WORK OF
CLEANING HURON BED
Ruins of Dam Near Old Jii. to Be
Dynamited by Low ring
- Water Below IDam
Work at cleaning up the Huron riv-
er, between Barton darn and..Tessmer's
boathouse, was begun yesterday 'by
workmen, employed by the Michigan
Union boat club. The operations which
will continue for several days, will in-
elude dragging all the logs, dead trees,
stumps and rocks from the river bed,
and the dynamiting of ruins of a dam
near the old mill, after the water be-
tween the two dams has been lowered
two or -there feet.
Plans are under consideration, for
building a new bath house and improv-
ing the bathing beach, just north of
the boat house. Alan T. Ricketcs
'15E, First Ensign of the boat club
is in charge of the work now being
done, and student engineers are assist-
ing in the management.

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