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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 11, 1914 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

pv 1

y ad. published
r the Best
>rofession is attract-
ge men. Several'
gnizing this ten-
augurated special
ee of advertising..
e for you to prove
ave talent for the
-with a possibility
toward your next
nal Fatima ad. sub-
,e man before June
pay $500 in gold.

PLAN THOROUGHLY0uIP -01FCE
Y. M. C. A. Officials Claim New Home
Best in American
Colleges

I)
e Y..
\
n- a-

SECURE PLEDGES FOR

$70,000

k

ILLUSTRATE your ad. if you can
P bat if you can't draw, then use
your kodak or describe your idea.

Iment of students' ads.
blished next month
ng next month, some of the ads.
ublished in college papers and
:h ad. so published, if the writer
gill publish his name, year and
will be paid for at the rate of $5
derstood however, that the selec-
blication does not signify that it
e to win the $500 than the ads.

us,

Fatima Facts
Pure Tobacco.
No finer tobacco used than st
Fatima.
Simple, inexpensive package.
The biggest selling 15 cent cig.
retie in America.
Made famous by college men.
The Turkish' tobacco used is
Fatima is specially selectedi by
resident nativ'e buyers at Xa nth!,'
Cavalla, Samsoun and Smyrna.
Smokers of high priced ciga-
rettes who smoke "a few pack-
ages of Fatima are-usually sat-
isfied to "switch."
Fatima Cigarettes are
"distinctively individual"
They are 20 for 15a

no restrictions whatever as to the method
employ or the way you shall approach the
cept that the ad. must be truthful.
our experience that no man can strike the
iction in any kind of salesmanship-written
-unless he believes in what he is selling.
a hint, however.

212 Fifth Ave., New York

K- .-H o E.D C-'A ULT T
RISH BLEND CIOARETTI'

MMITTEE HAS
OF APPLICANTS

fessor C. O. Davis, of the depart-
of education, addressed about
'ospective teachers, who had as-
ed to enroll with the appoint-
committee, in the auditorium of
rsity Hall Monday. This is a
r number than were enrolled by
rne last year, nearly 350 members
class of 1914 having then regis-
bese, 199 were placed by the ap-
cent committee before September
since then about 50 more have
d positions. The majority of
aers are pursuing other lines of
while not a few are taking post-
ite work, either here or at some
university.
hose who enrolled yesterday af-
n are urged to make the final
nent in the registrar's office this

PRESCOTT CLUB SECURE FOOD
EXPERT FOR OPENING LECTURE
For the first attraction on its pro-
gram for the year, the Prescott club
of the School of Pharmacy has secur-
ed Dr. J. A. Wesener, Phar. '88, of the
Columbus Laboratories and the School
of Milling and Baking Technology of
Chicago, Ill., who will lecture on
"Flour as Related to Modern Bread
Making," at 2:00 o'clock Friday, No-
vember 13, in room 165, chemistry
building.
Dr. Wesener is one of the leading
food experts of the country and was a
conspicuous figure in the famous pros-
ecution brought by the federal govern-
ment against the western millers in
the notorious"'Bleached Flour Case."
Although the lecture is intended pri-
marily for students in Household
Chemistry, Food and Drug Analysis,,
and Pharmacy, the public is cordially
invited to be present.

When Michigan's new University
Y. M. C. A. building, the .money for
which is being rapidly pledged by
friends of the association throughout
the country. is built, the University of
Michigan will have probably the finest
building of this kind in the United
States. Although the worth and con-
struction of buildings of this nature
have taken long strides throughout the
country, Michigan "Y" officials make
the statement that their building will
be one of the country's best-equipped
2ollege Y. M. C. A.'s.
The structure, which is to be built of
red brick and sandstone, will be two
stories high, with a basement fitted
up for association activities. There
will be 52 rooms in the building, all
of which have been -planned with
special uses in mind.
A large lobby on the first floor will
have the administration offices open-
ing off it. On this floor, there will
be a large assembly room on one side,'
and a commodious reading room has
been planned for the other side. Two
office rooms which will be used by the
local student pastors, one on each side
of the main entrance, have also been
arranged for.
On the second floor, there are a:
large number of class rooms, which
will be used for discussion and bible-
study groups. There will also be
several study rooms on this floor. Two
large club rooms will occupy one side
of the building, and these rooms will
be available for use by any of the
university organizations. A large
library room, which will be equipped
with selected books, will be located on
the other side of the floor.
The basement will have a large com-
mittee dining room and complete cul-
inary equipment. There will also be
located here a commodious game room,
and a whole side of the floor will be
given over to billiards. Several rooms
used for various other purposes, will
also be found on this floor.
To date $70,000 has been pledged
toward the erection of the building,
$60,000 of which is pledged conditional
to the raising of a like amount Al-
though the actual work on the struc-
ture will not be started until the en-
tire sum of money has been pledged,
it is hoped that conditions will be such
that the actual building operations can
be begun. next spring, so that the
building may be r ar y for use within
a year.
ANNOUNCE APPOINTMENTS OF
1914 HOMEOPA'THIC GRADUATES
Eight Engage in Practice, Six Enter
Outside Hospitals, Five Stay
in Ann Arbor

Students of the law school of the
University of Kansas threaten to
strike, if the student council carries
out the request of the faculty, to sus-
pend for one semester three law stu-
dents, who were ringleaders in a rally
held in the corridors of buildings while
classes were in session. The student
council has refused to suspend the
men for more than one week. One
man plays on the basketball team and
another on the baseball team.
-0--
The University of Missouri is plan-
ning to have 30 tennis courts ready
for use by spring. Iowa State College,
at Ames, is the only other school in
the Missouri Valley conference which
.furnishes courts for student use.
-o-- -
Syracuse University is observing a
week of prayer from November 9 to
14. Prominent men will speak at the
chapel exercises in the colleges of lib-
eral arts, fine arts and education.
--o-
Kappa Sigma fraternity of Syracuse
University has voluntarily announced
the policy of second semester initia-
tion.
-0--
A. E. Shipley, master of Christ's Col-
lege, Cambridge, England, has sent a
circular letter to American and Cana-
dian universities,. asking for Belgian
relief supplies which will be received
by Lady McDonnell, 23 Warwick1
Square, Pimlico, London, S. W.
-0----
Wellesley girls are rolling bandages;
for the use of the Red Cross in Eu-
rope.-
----
Prof. M. C. Carr, of the art depart-
ment of the University of Missouri, has
made his freehand drawing class pop-.
ular by organizing it into a Sketch
club which meets in the evening.

Prof. William A. Scott, of the com-
merce department of the University of
Wisconsin, will lecture next semester
at Leland Stanford University on the
new banking system.
-0-_
The voting precinct containing all
the residences connected with Leland
Stanford University, endorsed prohi-
bition, defeated the eight hour law,
and carried Johnson for governor by a
large majority.
--o--
Leland Stanford University raised
$1,000 by subscription for the Belgian
relief ship which will leave San Fran-
cisco in the near future and proceed
to Rotterdam by way of the Panama
Canal.
-o-
Yale claims to have a 9 4-5 second,
100 yard man in Williams, a freshman,
who ran for Exeter last year.
-0--
The department of romance lan-
guages of Leland Stanford University,
will offer a two-hour course in eco-
nomics, conducted in French, next
semester.
Moving pictures of Ohio State's cadet
regiment have been made by the Roy-
al Film Co., of Columbus.
-0---
Albert Benbrook, '11E, former Mich-
igan center, umpired the Ohio State-
Indiana game, at Columbus, Saturday.
"MAROON" EDITOR MUST EXPLAIN

Chicago Student Faces Trouble Over
"Faculty" Editorial
George W. Vottingham, student edi-
tor of the University of Chicago Daily
Maroon, will be asked ,to explain
charges, made by him in an editorial
Saturday morning, to the effect that
one of the professors "cheated" his
classes by giving high marks for work
not done. The editorial was one of a se-
ries running for several days, com-
menting on the ease with which stu-
dents taking certain elective courses
were able to get high marks.
The article read in part as follows:,
"The instructor lectured for a month,.
and then he announced - that there
would be no more meetings until the
final examination. He did not appear
at the examination. I received a B
from the course, and heard it talked
about that the instructor had said,
when questioned about the examina-
tion, 'Take the class lists and give
each member a B.'"

5 FORYQUR DEN5
Beautiful College Pennants
YALE and HARVARD
Each D in. x 24 in.
PRINCETON, COR-
NELL, MICHIGAN
Each 7 in. x 2 in.
4--PENNANTS, Size 2x30-.4
Any Leading Colleges 9f
Your Seleotiop.
All of our best duality, in their
proper colors, with colored em-
blems.
Either assortment, for limitec
time, sent postpaid for 5o cents
andfive stamps to cover shipping
costs.
Write us for prices before placing
orders for felt novelties of allkind.
The Gem City Novelty Co.
4210 Bittner Street
Dayton, Ohio
VISITORS AT FLORAL EXHIBIT
AVERAGE ONE THOUSAND DAI
Nearly 3000 people visited the fl
exhibit in Memorial hall on Saturc
The unusually large number of v
tors was partially due to the crc
of people here to attend the Pe
sylvania game, and, to accomimod
these, the building was left open
til 10:00 o'clock that night.
It is estimated that on an avera
nearly 1000 people have visited
display each day since its open
over a week ago, and it is expec
that this mark will be maintained d
ing the remaining time of the displ
Mr. Weiner, head gardener of
botanical gardens, has announced tr
he will keep the exhibit on disp
until after Thanksgiving, provid
the flowers remain fresh that long.
Receives Volume In Humanistic Sei
"Athenian Lekythoi," is the title
a recent volume of the humanistic s
ies which has been sent to the edi
of the Michigan Alumnus to be
viewed in that publication. It is wr
ten by Arthur Fairbanks, of the M
eum of Fine Arts in Boston. The b(
is published under the authority
the executive board of the gradu
department of the university.

-o-
Girls of Christian College, Columbia,
Mo., are glad to welcome parades of
students from the University of Mis-
souri on their campus after football
victories, but would be glad if they
would return the thermos bottles}1
and parts of toilet sets which were
taken from the first floor rooms as
souvenirs.

In future;
Drug Store..

all cars stop at

Drug Store.

i

iho Iaoa

~-

ESTABLISHED 1894

?Niz4igam

PRESIDENT HAIR BY B. hUTChINS

Harry Burns Hutchins was born at
isbon, New Hampshire on April 8,
847, and practically all of his boy-
ood was spent in the New England
ates; After graduation from the
iblic schools, he entered the New
ampshire Conference Seminary at
ilton, N. H. at the age of 14, at which
ace he completed his preparatory
ork for college.
Being graduated from there in his
neteenth year, he matriculated at
esleyau University in Middleton, N.
but on account of failing health,
was forced to leave that institution
fore completing his first year. A
tle later, his parents having decided
move to the west and never having
ven up his hope of a college educa-
m, he entered the University of
ichigan, from which he was gradu-
ed in 1871, receiving the degree of,
i.B. As an undergraduate at Mich-
an, he stood in the front ranks of
s class. He was, in his senior year,
e editor of the "Chronicle," the most
portant of zhe then existing univer-'
.y publications. At the time of his
aduation, he was chosen for the
sition of orator and commencement
eaker, the highest honor then con-
red by the faculty.
The next five years were spent as an
structor and assistant professor of
story and rhetoric in the University
Michigan. During this time Profes-
r Hutchins was married. In the yeari
16, he formed a law partnership withr
3 father-in-law which was success-
ly pursued in this state until 1884,1
.en he was tendered the chair of
ay Professor of Law" in the Uni-1
'sity of Michigan. This chair he
:upied until 1887.

knowicclge and organization
become generally recognized,
called by Cornell University
to organize a department of

having
he was
in 1887
law at

Atnouncement of appointments con-
rerred upon members of the 1914 hom-
'opathic class, as well as a list of
,ose who will engage in general prac-
tice, we-'e given out by members of
the homeopathic hospital staff yester-
day.
Ive of the class have secured posi-
tions in the local homeopathic hospi-
tal, six in hospitals elsewhere, and
right will engage in the general prac-
tice of medicine. Two of the members
)f the class were women.

JORDAN'S TAILORED
YOUNG MEN'S SUITS

that institution. This work was done
entirjly under the supervision of Pro-
fessor Hutchins, and the law depart-j
ment at Cornell is today considered
one of the leading legal schools of the
country.
He returned to Michigan in 1894 as
dean of the law department, which
position he filled in almost contin-
uous service until 1910, his incum-
bency being interrupted only during
the years of 1897-98, when he dis-
charged the duties of President Angell
who was absent from the university
on a diplomatic mission for the United
States.
In 1910, upon the resignation of
President Angell, Dean Hutchins was
tendered the presidency by the boa;:d
of regents.
President Hutchins received the
honorary degree of L.L.D. from the
University of Wisconsin in 1897. He
is a member of the advisory board of
the "Michigan Law Review" and is
also a member of the American Bar
Association, having acted as the pres-
ident of the section on "Legal Educa-
tion" for one year. Under appoint-
ment of the Supreme Court of Mich-
igan, he revised and annotated five
volumes of Supreme Cburt reports,
and he has done much active work in
the preparation of several text-books.
He contributed a biography of the
late Thomas M. Cooley, a former dean
of the law department at Michigan, in
the series on "Great American Law-
yers," and he has written many papers
which have appeared in law periodi-
cals throughout the country.

READY TO WEAR

The list of graduates and their posi-
ions is as follows: R. S. Ideson, in-
"erne, homeopathic hospital, Ann Ar-
bor; M. A. Darling, assistant in gyne-
cology and obstetrics, homeopathic
hospital, Ann Arbor; C. D. Pillsbury,
assistant in surgery, homeopathic hos-
pital, Ann Arbor; H. J. Burrell, assist-
ant in internal medicine, homeopathic
hospital, Ann Arbor; Sadie L. Orney,
interne, homeopathic hospital, Ann Ar-
bor; Geo. G. Shoemaker,'acting super-
intendent, homeopathic hospital, Pitts-
burg, Pa.; Ed. J. Phillips, interne,
Ernest Wendt hospital, Buffalo, N. Y.;
R. V. Hadley, interne, Buffalo homeo-
pathic hospital, Buffalo, N. Y.; P. M.
Champlin, interne, Gowanda Asylum,
Gowanda, N. Y.; G. B. Fauldner, in-
terne, Metropolitan hospital, New York
city; Miss Bessie Coffin, interne Wom-
a's hospital, Philadelphia, 'Pa.; N. E.
Stewart, in practice, Tedrow, Ohio;
Ira D. McCoy, in practice, Cass City,
Michigan; Q. B..Huntley, in practice,
Lowell, Michigan; D. B. Hagerman, in
practice, Grand Rapids, Michigan; F.
R. Reed, ixt practice, Detroit, Michi-
gan; J. C. Danforth, surgeon, Chal-
mers Motor Co., Detroit, Michigan;
J. F. Migdalski, in practice, Detroit,
Michigan; G. G. Alway, in practice,
Whitmore Lake, Michigan.
My pictures of the Football men are
the best-and only 10c.-Lyndon. tf.

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