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November 08, 1914 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILYA

It, J.
RATION
Brumm,
service,

ing to Prof. J. R.
the university news

Ahubb House
Open year
round
ATE $4.25 per Week
G. S. CHUBB, Proprietor
. A. NEELANDS, Steward

more space is being given this year
by the newspapers receiving the copy
sent out than ever before. Everything
that is sent in is being placed and this
is due in a measure to the changed
character of the selections given to
the papers. The .state papers in par-
ticular have printed all the news se-
lections given to the papers. The
eastern papers have given especial at-
tention to the articles on the housing
problem here in the university, the
fraternity question and the inter-fra-
ternity conference rules, and the uni-
versity administration happenings.
The university news service is this
ye ar proving to be a great success,.
and.Prof Brumm is more than pleased
with the reception which the newspa-
pers are giving the selections sent out
under his direction.

.

i
Y lO

I ,. V

I

Broken Lenses

DUPLICATED

IN TWO HOURS
We grind any Eyeglass Lens in our
own shop.

Competent, accurate optical work, in
the fitting and making of Glasses

EYES EXAMINED
GLASSES MADE

4-
.
f

TRAVELERS RELATE
THRILLi-NG FIGHT
War De)laration Finds iDetroiters in
Midst of Great Military
Operations '
BRITISH OFFICERS SEARCH SHIP
Although many Michigan men have
told varied tales of their wanderings
in the European war zone, the party
consisting of three Detroiters, Dr. J.
G. English, W. J. Calgins, '14E, and
J. T. Naylon, '15E, who journeyed
through the very heart of the warring
nations, listened to the whistling of
shells, slept beneath the whirring of
militaty aeropla nes, were halted on
the high seas, and finally reached
home unscathed, can, perhaps, recount
more thrills and chills than any of the
others who were caught in Europe on
their summer vacation.
Starting on a pleasure and photog-
raphing trip to Constantinople, the
voyagers were caught in mid-ocean
With the news of Arch-duke Ferdi-
nand's assassination. Nevertheless,
they pressed on through England and
France without noticing any signs of
war, and it. was not until they had
reached Venice, that the first declara-
tion was made.-- that of Austria
against Servia. Even in the face of
this, the party pushed on to Vienna,
and learned, upon reaching that city,
that Russia and Germany were mobil-
izing.
Basel, Switzerland, offered a place
of refuge for them for the first few
days of the .war. It was while there,
that the wanderers heard the shells of
the battle of Mulhausen, in Alsace, and
lay awake on their cots, listening to
the ghostly war-planes on their deadly
night missions. Among the 150 Amer-
icans delayed in Basel, a veritable
committee of safety was organized, in
the form of a society, of which Mr.
Naylon was made assistant secretary.
The party then made their way to
Genoa, to get a ship bound for home.
Contrary to conditions in Switzerland,
where prices had been reasonable,
there the travelers were compelled to
pay triple prices for their passage on
the "Verona." Even then, their troub-
les were not over. The "Verona" was
held up out of Gibraltar by a British
gunboat, and it was not until they had
thrice assured their captors of the
absence of Germans on the "Verona,"
that the latter vessel was allowed to
resume h'er journey.
FORM M1,1IIGAN CHAPTER OF
BIROTERHOOD OF S'r* ANDREW
At a recent meeting held in the Epis-
copal church, a Michigan chapter of
the Brotherhood of St. Andrew was
organized. The Brotherhood is com-
posed entirely of university men, and
as organized consists of 18 members,
four regular and 14 probationary. With
these, as a nucleus, the association
hopes to develop into a much larger
institution. 1. C. Johnson, '16, was
elected acting director.

NO DRUGS - NO DANGER

STDETESCAPES
Cornelius Baer, '16, Relates Thrilling
Experiences of Shipwreck
in South Seas
LIVES WITH FIERCE CANNIBALS
Probably there is no student in the
university who has had more exciting
or hairbreadth experiences than Cor-
nelius G. Baer, '16, who talked to the
Cosmopolitan club Wednesday night.
He was wrecked on a cannibal island
of the south seas 10 years ago, when
"sailing before the mast," and his ad-
ventures sound like the wildest phan-
:asies of a fiction writer.
"It was in June 1904, when our ship
the 'Aigburth' set sail from Newcastle,
Australia, for London," said Baer yes-
terday in recounting his adventures.
Heavy storms prevented us from tak-
ing the usual route around the south
coast of Australia, so we started
northward through the coral islands
and along the coast of New Guinea.
We were out about 60 miles from the
New Guinea coast, when the ship
struck a sunken reef and started to
settle in a dangerous manner."
"We abandoned the ship and made
our way to the shore in row-boats.
Upon reaching the island, we noticed
natives moving about in the distance
and gradually drawing nearer. At
close range they turned and made a
break for the jungle, terrified at the
sight of a white man, which was ap-
parently a new thing for them. After
much effort, we effected a truce with
them and traded some clothing for a
few supplies and a fire stick.
"A few days later, when all eyes
were scanning the sea for a sail, sev-
eral canoes appeared. Thinking that
perhaps they were filled with traders,
we hailed them. What was our dis-
may to learn that they were more
south sea islanders. It was later
learned that they belonged to the cun-
ning Arramut tribe of cannibals. At
first these savages seemed very friend-
ly and agreeable, but when they start-
ed feeling of the flesh on our arms
and legs w had a few misgivings."
"We lived with these people for nine
days, all the time growing more and
more restless, for they persisted in
feeding us great quantities of cocoanut
and other fattening foods. The second
mate identified the tribe as man-eaters
but we could do nothing but wait and
watch for a chance to make our get-
away. One day a Chinese trader from
a neighboring island visited the tribe.
We made it known to him through
signs that we wished to escape from
the hands of the savages. He inform-
ed us that a trading schooner would
stop at this island in two weeks."
"The Chinaman did not have room
'or us in his boat, but the next day we
stole several of the natives' boats
while they were out hunting and made
our way to Manndock island where
the Chinese trader was located. None
of us doubted but that the savages
would have eventually killed and eaten
us.
"A German sloop, the 'Nubia,' took
us off the island A week later. We
found our way back to Australia by
way of German Guinea and the liner,
'Prinz Sigismund.'"

1*1

6 .rt ~" -a"-u" -. -'
In order to aid its treasury, the Uni-
versity of Indiana Union has taken
over a motion picture show which will
be managed and operated by a com-
mittee of students.
Petitions are being circulated on the
campus of the University of Indiana,
asking the student council to reinstate
the new dances at campus affairs.
-0--o-~
'raining table for the football team
at the University of California is con-
ducted by the fraternities, one frater-
nity being chosen each season. The
honor is widely sought.
-0-
3n institution worthy of imitation
is the "forum," which has been tried
out with success at Harvard. Last
Tuesday evening 100 undergraduates
participated in an open discussion at a
war forum conducted by the Harvard
Union and the Speakers' club. Forums
on this and other public questions will
be arranged later.
--0---
Women students of the University of
Texas are circulating petitions asking
that their basketball and other teams
be allowed to schedule intercollegiate
games. The campaign grows out of
the fact that, when the women's bas-
ketball team of Southwestern Univer-
sity came to Austin last year, their
coach, who was a man, was excluded
from the gymnasium and spent the
evening in the parlor of the women's
building, from where he conducted the
game over the telephone.
FIGURES SHOW BIG INCREASE
OF UNIVERSITY ENROLLMENT
Statistics Disclose Margin of 311 Over
Grand Total for Same Time
Last Year
"Science," in its next issue, will
show the total enrollment of the Uni-
versity of Michigan for the year ending
Nov. 1, 1914, to be 6319, or an increase
of 311 over the figures of Nov. 1, 1913.
These statistics will be publisheci
along with the enrollment figures of
other universities, computed on a sim-
ilar basis.
The figures of Nov. 1 show an in-
I-

crease of 17 over the enrollment in all
departments of the university on Oct.
15, the greatest gain since that time
having been made in the graduate de-
partment.
Following are the figures for Nov.
1, 1914, as compared with those of
Nov. 1, 1913:

MONDAY Nov 9
Matinee and Night
Messrs. Kent & O'Connor
Offer a Splendid Scenic Production
of the gverlasting Success
as L n e.With a Notable Cast
Including.
Miss Jacqueline DeWitt
as "lady Isabel"
All special scenery and lighting effects
A specially selected cast
Prices:
Matinee
Lower Floor 20c Balceny lee
Night
1St 4 rows 120 seats.........3e
Balance of Balcony.............25e
Seats on Sale Saturday Morning at Ro

Department 1914
Literary. ..............2582
Dental ..................318
Graduate................258
Law .......... .........499
Medical........... . 304
Homoeopathic............74.
Pharmic............ . 110
Engineering............1247
Architecture.... . ......145
Total..................5637
Registered twice ..........115
Net......... ......522
Summer Session.........1594
Total..................7116
Registered twice..........797
'rand Total.... . 6819

1913
2520
282
225
553
278
- 75
96
1282
120
6491
127
5304
1402
6706
698
6008

I

E. H. ARNOLD
OPTOMETRIST
With ARNOLD & CO., Jewelers
220 So. Main Street

Registered by State Examination

_ .._,

.. ....

no

- oyTheatre Thursday
ii , U Nov. 12'
VonderfulRevival of the Brilliant and Fascinating
Musical Comedy
[ LpLR OF
With a Rem kable Cast that ine'udes
0oizntess O 1a Von tafmsldt
N Irving Brooks Clara Throop COMPANY
AN Harlan Briggs Marie Cranier OF 60
., Jules Epailly Adele Boulis.
a Big Singing and Dancing Cherus of 35r
genuine musical hit-that has delighted more than four million
people in four years.

WHITNEY THEATRE
rdy Nusica Cov.Y 13
The'Merry Musical Comedy Frolic

FOR THE

LOVE

y MIKE
By Bud Fisher, creator of "Mutt and Jeff."

40-Musical Comedy Stars, mostly Cirls!'40
I'll inkigl

inkling
easing ^
antalizing
unes

irth
elod
usi

ig
reezy
ewitching
eauty Chorus

P R I C 1Lack of Interest Kills News Bulletin
Unless a further demand is made for
Orc estra its recontinuance, the university news
13 Rows.. .. .............$1.00 bulletin will not be started this year
8 O W .. .. .. ...B. .. .. .. .. ...y1. 0 according to Prof. J.,R. Brumm, who
Balcony
Rows........................................ ....$1.0O has charge of the work. The winter
4 ".. .............. .............---.75 entertainments and lectures have not
6 "......... ...... ...........-.-.-..50 been fully started as yet, and it is
ry............................................. ..2. .hoped that when more news is availa-
Seats Sale Tuesday ble, sufficient interest will be shown
'o warrant the issuing of the bulletin.

Greatest Laughing Show of the Age

A TUNEFUL TORNADO

A HILARIOUS HURRICANE

An Ar-my of Pretty Girls
A Host of Reuel Comediwas

Timely Prices 25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00_

-

AJESTIC

ALWAYS A GOOD SHOW
mday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Nov. 9-10-11
Special Engagement of the $1000 Feature Act
lus Edwards

:id

SAS KAONJOE DANIELS MADAM MARION
Hawaiian instrumentalist Eccentric monologist and A quick change sensation in
KAd O NI E e N IeLS they "uropean Protean nov-
and vocalist entertainer elty "A Daughter of Proteus"

6

.baret

clever youngsters in 35 min-
utes of fast fun, and clever
singing, dancing and music.

tinees each week--Tuesday.Wednesslay.-Friday-Saturday. An entire new bill every Monday and Thursday.Only the first show
reserved-Seats held until 7:30. Ladies' Fouvenir Matimees Fvery Tuesday and Friday. School childiens' Matinee every
ny child rinder 12 years 5e.
.NG-"CARTER," THE GREAT AMERICAN MAGICIAN

11

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