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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 06, 1914 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GAN DAILY.

THE MIC'.

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IV

-ECK4IAO

Let us show you this New
Piece of Study Furniture
most every convenience that you have ever hoped to see has been suc-
ssfully installed-wide, heavy arm rests, book shelves, magazine com-
rtments, sliding drawers under lock and key, newspaper-book holder
at is adjustable, typewriter support, and shelves and pockets tucked
in everywhere.
ie Eskwin is a handsome, massive piece of furniture, built of heavy
artered oak, It is put together by hand, and can be quickly .dis-
antled when necessary. In all respects it is ahundred pe cent efficient.

(First Floor -Furniture)

4

000
qw

IARBOR ARTIST '
9O TSIBITSPICTURBES
11. Barnes Displays Paintings
Scenes in Valley of Huron
River
DeVOLL ALSO SHOWS WORK
sual interest' is being shown in
intings of Mr. E. H. Barnes and
Usher De Voll, now on exhibit in
'ial hall. Mr. Barnes is a local
and has received his entire
g in this country; in. the Art
te of Chicago, the Cincinnati
ny of Art, and the Art Students'
of New York City.
Barnes' paintings portray scenes
Ann Arbor, mostly in the valley
Huron. He has sought out the
beautiful and the most signifi-
cenes, and all seasons of the
re represented. Conservative in
ae has produced paintings which
leasing in light effects, and
ble in c'olor.
of his niost noteworthy works
he Boulevard in Winter." The
s of a road covered with snow,
'hich are cast the warm rays of
tting s>un. Less realistic, but
>oetic, is "The River." The pic-
Early Spring," has created much
ble, comment.
De Voll, a native of Providence,
as chosen his landscapes most-
a scenes in New England. He

has studied in the Rhode Island School
of Design, under William Chase, and
in Paris. He is inclined more toward
impressionism, and his productions
show the influence of the American
painters, Childe Hassam and.Dudley
Murphy.
"Greater New York in Early Even-
ing," a scene showing the Brooklyn
bridge district from the roof of an
office building is one of his most strik-
ing paintings. "A New England Vil-
lage° in Moonlight," and "Autumn
Glow" are also effective. The exhibit
will last two weeks.
LABORATORIES LUCKILY MEET
REQUIREMENTS OF STUDENTS
Due only to a lucky circumstance,
accommodations in the chemistry lab-
oratories are just large enough to
meet the n'number of -students register-
ed in the courses. As the figures now
stand, there are approximately the
same number as were registered last
year.,
In consideration of the fact that the
dropping of qualitative chemistry 3A,
formerly required of- all engineers,
eliminated about 140 or 150 students
from the laboratories, there has been
a gain of that many in the other chem-
istry sections, principally in general
and organic. At present, by switching
laboratory tables and economizing in
room, the laboratorie., are filled to
their limit. If the 3A requireneit had
not been Hl'td. it can easily. be seen
that the chemistry building would
never have been able to accommodate
this year's registration.

UNIVERSITY UNIQUE
WITH MARINETANK
University's Proximity To Great Lakes
Makes Novel Course Given In
Marine Engineering
Practical
DEAN COOLEY WAS FIRST ONE
TO UNDERTAKE COURSES HERE
Department Has Tested Many Vessels
Now On Eastern Rivers
and Elsewhere
Due to the fact that Ann Arbor is
a long distance from the coast, it is
usually a surprise to visitors to learn
that the University of Michigan has a
course in naval architecture and ma-
rine engineering. This is easily ex-
plained however by the fact that the
nearby Great Lakes carry a larger
amount of American shipping than
does the Atlantic coast and that the
actual- tonnage passing through the
locks at the Soo exceeds that of the
Suez Canal. There are large shipbuild-
ing yards at Buffalo, Cleveland, Lor-
ain, Toledo, Detroit;. Chicago, Duluth,
and elsewhere; and several years ago
the American Shipbuilding company of
the Great Lakes had the distinction of
turning out the greatest tonnage of
ships of any of the shipbuilding con-
cerns of the world.
So far as the teaching of the theory
and scientific part of modern ship de-
signing is concerned, this can be done
as well at Michigan as elsewhere es-
pecially when it is remembered that
it has a well equipped engineering
department.
When Dean M. E. Cooley was first
detailed to Michigan from the United
States Navy, as professor of mechani-
cal engineering, he made it a point of
offering some courses in marine engi-
neering, so the start of the department
may be said to date from that time.
In the year 1900, it was decided to in-
crease the work offered in this branch
of engineering and to establish it as
one of the regular courses. Prof. H.
C. Sadler, who was then assistant pro-
fessor at Glasgow University, Scot-
land, was chosen to take charge of the
work.
When plans for the new engineering
building were being made it was dis-
covered that, with little additional
cost, a naval tank could be installed,
in which it would be possible to carry
out much valuable experimental work;
upon the resistance and propulsion of
ships. In this way, Michigan became
unique in being the only university
possessing such a tank. Some of the
equipment was donated by different
firms, and the rest was constructed in
the university shops.
The tank itself is 300 feet long, 22
feet wide, with a depth of water of
ten feet; this last can be reduced, if
necessary, by fitting a false bottom,
so that effects of shallow water upon
the resistance of vessels may be stud-
ied. The models used are generally
from ten to twelve feet long and are
mUade of paraffin wax first cast rough-
ly to shape and finally finished to the
correct form in a specially designed
::ttng machine.
Since the tank was installed a large
amount of investigation has been car-
ried on, the results of which have been
published in many technical publica-
tions. The tank is open for the use o
shipkbilders so that models may be
tested and developed before the ship
is built. Numerous vessels at present

on the Great Lakes, eastern rivers,
Puget Sound, and elsewhere, have had
their models developed at Michigan;
and in a good many cases, by proper
scientific methods, it has been possible
to make a considerable saving in the
horsepower, and hence in the coal re-
quired. Recently a good deal of work
has been done in connection with the
developmeut of forms of vessels for
vork upon our Western rivers, so as
to obtain the most economical type.
The..rest of the work of the depart-
ment aims to give the student a thor-
oughly sound engineering basis, fol-
lowed by fundamental courses under-
lying the theory and practice of ship
design and of the machinery connected
therewith.
OFF CIAL SOUVENIR PROGRAMS
TO BE PLACED ON SALE TODAY
Official souvenir programs for the
Pen-Michigan game will be placed on
sale today on the campus and at the
State street stores. They will also be
handled at the mass meeting tonight.
The cover portrays a football player
just after kicking a goal and is done
in three colors. Full page cuts of both
teams and a number of the leading
players are contained in the booklet.
The feature is a story by Coach Yost
himself, on his all time Michigan
eleven.

ORATIONS FOR PEACE CONTEST
MUST BE READY BY DECEMBER
Orations for the peace oratorical
contest are due December 4, as the
preliminaries will be held December
10-11 and the final contest December
21. The state peace contest is to be
held in Ann Arbor March, 29, 1915, the
inter-state contest April 23, and the
national contest at Lake Mohonk on
May 20.
This year's debate will be more in-
teresting than ever in view of the-
European situation. The orations are
to deal with national peace and arbi-
tration. Michigan has won the state,
Inter-state, and national contests twice
in five years.
- e
THE NEW MAN.
By Philip Gibbs (309.42 G44)
Social, religious and political chang-
es of the day are attributed largely to
the so-called new man by Mr. Gibbs.
The book gets down remarkably deep
for one which does not lay claim to
any especial profundity. Every page
is filled with little stimuli to serious
thought, and while some of the con-
clusions are drawn too hastily to be
convincing, the reader cannot help but
get a better view of modern upheavals
by his very disagreement with the
views of the writer.
The new Wvoman appears to have
prompted Mr. Gibbs to discuss the new
men. He admits it, qualifiedly, and
goes on to show how%, in his opinion,
the man of today owes his lately-ac
quired attributes to the necessity of
keeping pace with the modern type
of feminism. While written in Eng-
land, and about English people, the
theory would seem to be of almost
equal interest to men and women in
America.
Unless the new man changes, and
learns to cling to some other ideal
than his passion to help himself and
to please himself, there is certain
catastrophe ahead, affirms the author.
The statement refers to the passing
of religious interest and the suprein-
acy of an easy type of selfishness in
the present-day man.

The Boston Herald has the following
to say: "Those Michigan boys had
such a good time that they might con-
sent to leave Ann Arbor for Cambridge
if President Lowell would only abolish
the mid-years. Come again, Michigan."
-o-
A communication to The Pennsyl-
vanian calls attention to the unfair-
ness often shown by cheerleaders in
quieting the crowd when the ball is in
Pennsylvania's possession that the
players team might hear the signals
and in leading continuous cheers when
the ball was in the hands of the op-
ponents. The sentiment of the stu-
dent body is decidely against this
practice.
five eights of the Dartmouth fresh-
men are deficient in scholarship, 279
out of 445 being below passing grade
in one or more subjects, according to
figures of Prof. F. A. Updyke. Of this
number, 184 are ineligible to represent
either their class or college in any ac-
tivity. Deficiencies are twice as great
as last year in spite of stiffer entrance
requirements.
-o--
A series of interclass water polo
contests have been started at Colum-
bia University to determine 'the cam-
pus championship. In the first game
the seniors beat the juniors 5 to 3.
The New York Giants are said to
have made overtures to John Reilly,
Yale's third baseman and Harry Le
Gore, shortstop. Both assert they in-
tend to go into business as soon as
they complete their college work.
The University of Cincinnati is first
in the field with a series of: interclass
athletic contests to do away with the
old-time rush. Wrestling, boxing,
cross country running and a football
game were parts of the underclass
program.
The University of Cincinnati is using
motion pictures in teaching evolution
in writing, hygiene, banking, railroad-
ing, sociology and journalism.
- 0-
Close dancing, deep dipping and
swinging off the floor have been cen-
sored by the dance committee at the
University of California.

A FEAST
for the devotee of athletics is a
visit to a Spalding store. There
he can see and
¢UOINQ examine imple-
TRADE ments and ac-
tfi o cessories f o r
PILDI Ia1 every known
athletic sport:
'QARKp An expert will
IN take pleasure
in showing
him what the champions use in
their respective lines. He can
wield a racket, swing a golf club
or a baseball bat, punch a bag
or "do a stunt" on the gym ap-
paratus; he can even take an
imaginary row on one of the
rowing machines; in fact, he
can go through the manoeuvres
of every form of athletic sport
right in our store.
If you cannot call at Spalding
store, then the next best thing
is to send for a Spalding cata-
logue.
A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
254 Woodward Ave.
DETROIT, 1ICII.
Many Tickets Left for Saturday's Came
Although the final, rush for tickets
to the Pennsylvania football game is
beginning to slacken, there are still
nearly two thousand tickets not yet
taken. Indications show that the larg-
est crowd ever on Ferry field, will see
the game, however.
Students sitting in the block "M" are
still slow in claiming their flags at
the athletic association. The author-
ities state that upless the men apply
for their tickets more rapidly, the "M"
is apt to prove a failure.
Tentative Plans Made for Spanish Club
Tentative plans were made for the
organization of a Spanish club at a
meeting of Spanish students held in.
the north wing yesterday afternoon.
Walter D. Bird, '15, was elected tem-
porary chairman, and Robert H. Tan-
nahill, '15, temporary secretary. A
committee was chosen to make plans
for drawing up a constitution.
New Lathe Made By Students in Shops
Students in advance shop have made
a sample 12 inch metal turning lathe.
It is to be installed and tested and if
proves satisfactory a number are to
be made for a campus reserve stock.
A large three thousand dollar manu-
facturing lathe, recently installed, is
to be used later in the semester for
demonstrating purposes.

le Print'
Dance Programs, Tally Cards, etc.
Leather Programs a Specialty.
l e BInd
Class Records, Technical Journals,
Periodicals, Magazines, etc.

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rtistic Work

- Prompt Service - Right Price

The

sayer, Schalrer Co.

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