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October 23, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-10-23

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I,

IC

igan

Daily

$2.50~

ANN \ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1914.

PRICE FIV

'I I

TODAY

Dixie club meeting, Michigan Union,
TO 7:30 o'clock.
JELD Wright saxophone party, Michigan Un-
ion, 9:00 o'clock.

At
t end to

ross country club to Ypsilanti; run-
ners leave Waterman gym, at 3:45
o'clock.

T OMORROW

Football, All-Fresh vs. Alma, Ferry
field, 2:30 o'clock.
Chess and Checker club meeting,
Michigan Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Union membership ,dance, Michigan
Union, 9:00 o'clock.
SYRACUSE ENTERS
I CAME CAUTIOUSLY

Hands of Princeton Eleven
t By Showing Against
Rochester Men
WORRIES ORANGE SQUAD
,L1 to The Michigan Daily)
e, N. Y., Oct. 22-Coach
'Niel is giving his Orange
d practice, behind closed

awn, the kicking sensation of the
rners, is the only man really
I by the local eleven. Princeton
ged to nose out a victory over
syracuse braves by the aerial
, despite the superior work of
arsity in rushing the ball.
locals came through the Ro-
er game in excellent shape, and
ie men except Seymour are in
tion for a hard game. The veter-
as excused from practice today,
'ill be in harness Saturday.
team was given a hard scrim-
against the Freshmen this after-
but will have a light workout
y, in preparation for the big
of 'the home season against
gan on. Saturday.

ION HEADS DESIRE MEETING;
SCE MNPA 6AS W L INE ORGANIZATION PLANNED
enceofUinPeiet
YPSILANTI TODAY OPENINGCONCERT Ateoe On
Coach McCall With Fifteen Uniformed To Appear in First Number of Choral An endeavor is being made to ar-
Players Leaves on D. U. R. at Union Series, at Hill range a meeting of the presidents of
2:10 To Vie With Auditorium Next all college and university Unions in
Normalites Wednesday. the west with the idea in view of dis-
cussing matters of common interest
INTRAMURAL DIRECTOR ROWE LEO SLESAK, BOSTON TENOR, TO and talking over the problems with
'1 ACCOMPANY LOCAL SQUAD SING IN ANN ARBOR IN MARCH which such organizations are con-
fronted. If present plans are carried
B-- Childrens' Chorns Is Among Features out the meeting will be held in Colum-
Brown, eteran of Last Year, Will Not Being Planned For May bus, Ohio, and will be arranged by
Take Part In Game Because Festival, the president of the Ohio State Uni-
Of Bad Knee _versity Union working with P. D.
Madam Johanna Gadski, of 'the Met- Koontz, '14-'17L, president of the Mich-
Coach. McCall will take the entirelgan Union.
soccer squad to Ypsilanti today where ropolitan opera company, New York, The Michigan Union is the largest
and Leo Slesak, of thie Boston opera and most active Union in the country
the team~ lines up against the Normal; company, will sing on the choral n feigvlutr nmerhp.Nt
ites' eleven. Fifteen players will don ion concert course this winter. Mad- "uralyrthe othr nionbersentd
urally the other Unions represented
uniforms and -the rest of the squad am Gadski will appear in Hill audito- at the meeting will gain the most
will accompany the team for the'sake rium, next Wednesday, and the giant good from the proceedings but without
of watching the more experienced tenor will come in March. doubt many ideas can be gained that
The Philadelphia orchestra, under work out to good advantage on
men tussle. wlJ1 okott oo datg n
Leopold Stokowski, and with Theodore the Michigan campus.
Twenty-six strong, including Coach Harrison, baritone, as soloist, will - -
McCall and Intramural Director Rowe, give a concert in December. In Feb-
ruary, the Cincinnati orchestra under
the squad will leave over the' D. U. R. Dr. Ernst Kunwald will play. Both ' ifliDATE
at 2:10 o'clock this afternoon, board- orchestras will bring conipanies of
ing the car at State and Packard. one hnndred men each. Ferruclo Bu-
The game will start at 3:30 o'clock. soni, the distinguished Italian pianist,
McCall will hold down the right for- will give a recital in November.u
In May, the regular number of six
ward position. concerts in four days which constitute Don Smith, '16E, Welcomes Investiga-
After a light workout yesterday the the May Festival will be given. The tion of Alleged Corruption
names of those to make the trip were Chicago symphony orchestra, conduct- at Voting
posted in the new clubhouse behind ed by Frederick Stock, will make its
the stadiumn. While the lineup given annual appearance. The university CLASS VOTES AGAIN TUESDAY
choral union will sing under the di-
out then was tentative, it was assumed rection of Prof. Albert A. Stanley. A "I consider that this 'investigation',
that every position but left half was large children's chorus will combine by an honorary society was undertak-
decided upon. Brown, a veteran of with the choral union in a concert in en for the purpose of making sure the
last year, is suffering from a' bad knee the Saturday evening concert to pre- elec.tion of their candidate, and I
and it is doubtful whether he will be sent Pierne's monumental "Children's would welcome any investigation by}
able to engage in today's fight. His Crusade. With two choruses, orches- the student council," said Don Smith,
place, however, is the one for which tra and soloists, this concert will '16E; one of the candidates for presi-
three men are struggling, stand out as one of the biggest choral
woksevratemte n nAro. dent of the junior engineering class,
Kruger, Joseph, and Martin are all sAlast night.
likely looking candidates and theirTd " have heard from several sources
performances.in the practices held to Wolf-Ferrari's New Life" and that I was to be defeated at all costs
athat I wasato be defeatedtattallTcorts
date has impressed the coach suffici- Bassi's "Paradise Lst at the Thurs-evenIfIt was necessary to carry h
ently to have hiorderthemto the festival have not matter to the student council, in the
scene of conflict in uniform. Any one yet been engaged, but negotiations are event of my election. They are trying
of these men is liable to fill the gap pending with some of the most at- to accomplish my defeat by claiming
left if Brown is unable to play. tractive stars so as to make the twen- that there is a gang of 12 men banded"
The Michigan lineup as announced ty-second May Festival the equal of together for the sake of putting me in
last night follows. Reed, goal; Tripo- any which has preceded it. office.
Jitis, left forward; Van Domselaar, Tickets for the entire winter course "I first .learned of any such 'gang''
right forward; Dombooragien, right are now on sale at the school of mu- when I saw it in this morning's paper.
half; Fowler, center half; Brown, left sic. Tickets purchased for the winter The only 'gang' that I have heard
hal; Peirsol, right end; McCall, right course contain a coupon which will be about, isthe one that many 1916 engi-
forward; Cohen, center; Walton, left counted as $3 in exchanging for a May neers think have run things to suit
forward; Romein, right forward. Festival ticket. Holders of tickets for theiselves sInce' the organization of
After the game the soccer team will the winter course need pay only 50 the class. I. believe the principle rea-
attend the cross-country banquet at cents to $1 extra for the festival tick- son why I have had any strength in
the Occidental Hotel. ets this election, is the desire of many
Single tickets for the Gadski concert members of the class to put its con-
SENIOR ENGINEER UNDERWENT may be purchased at the school of mu- trol into new hands.
MILITARY SERVICE IN EUROPE sic for $1.00 to $1.50 on Tuesday. "As for these accusations, I don't
know of any group of 12 men behind
John R. Zenisek, '15E, Was Formerly STUDENT BIBLE CLASSES ARE me. I have authorized nobody to cam-
Lieutenant in Austrian PREPARING FOR YEAR'S WORK paign for me. I have made no bar-
Army . gains. I have made no committee ap-
First Meeting Will Be Held Wednesday pointments. These accusations are
Among the Mich students who Evening At Newberry absurd, and I deny them not because
have been touched by the present Eu- Hall I desire the office, but in justice to my-
ropean war is John R. Zenisek, '15E, self and friends"
formerly a lieutenant in the Austro- Freshmen and uperclass bible dis- The junior engineers tried to elect
Hungarian army a president in yesterday's assembly,
During the summer, Zenisek, who is cussion classes will hold their first At the first election Tuesday Smith re-
on the reserve list of the Austrian meeting of the year at 6:45 o'clock ceived 30 votes, Mack 23, and C.
government, received an order to re- next Wednesday night in Newberry Bloomsheld 14. Bloomsheld was elim-
goernmendjintheceedanyorderre-hall. The central committee, which has inated at the first election. No student
turn and join eaunivrm Htstuden idcharge of the work has divided the 20 councilman was present at yesterday's
had already taken out his firstnat- classes into groups of ham six to election. The next election will be
uralization papers in he United States. twUniversty professors will lead the ld Tuesday
Zenisek heard nothing more from his.diversiteroferwlasthe
native government, but a short time discussions in'the upper classes while
ago lie received a letter from his sister the first year classes will be in charge a
at Prague, Bohemia, stating that he of sophomores and upperclassmen.
SAt these meetings which will be held

had been exiled by thue government,-
and that he could not return to Aus- every week from 6:;45 o'clock to 7:45 i
Zenisek came to Ann Arbor a year to discuss any topics which may be
ago. When he was serving as an of particular interest to them, thus
offcerintheary sveal eas aoenabling them to obtain each others Europe's wretched situation, with
officer in the army several years ago, nbngte tobtiechthr combined nations bent upon obliterat-
he met the American consul at Vienna, views onrvarious subjects. c obine aions e n ta
who advised him to go to the United The freshman classes will discuss ing each other, has caused many to
States, and continue his studies there. problems pertaining to their college fear that true brotherhood and friend-
According to Zenisek, whose sym- life, such as expenses, mode of living ship cannot exist between different
pathies are now purely American, the and student morals. They, will use nationalities. Every means for im-
Ausrian outlook in the European con- "Student Standards of Action" by El-
flic isnotbriht.He tats tat heiot and, Cutler, as a textbook from proving the present state of affairs on
flit is not bright. He states that the ndthe Eastern hemisphere has been
Austrian people are naturally averse which to carry on the discussions. found to fail utterly in practice; yet,
to war, and for many years have been The sophomores will use as a text on to sil teyoin Arac tic ,
friends with Servia and other adjoin- "The Main Point" by C. R. Brown, on this side of the broad Atlantic,
ing countries. The blood ties of the which deals with the divinity of Christ, nates of the restive coni
Slavic. race binds them together. immortality, the Christian church and gaged in this most dreadful conflict
"TewoeAsr-ugra rythe use of the creed. have united to crush several aggrega-
"The whole Austro-Hungarian army L s fteced ions of patriotic members of an en-
is undermined by socialism," said The juniors will discuss world prob- tions ofepatrioti
ZeZnisek, yesterday." It was not un- lems such as, "The Negro," "The tirely different nation.
common to see a brother officer shot Country Church," and "The Immi- Russia, England, Germany, Persia,,
down by some rabid advocate of dis- grant." Their discussions will require Greece, Holland, Canada, Uruguay,
armament. Of course, all of these an- the use of several textbooks. yes, even the United States is repre-
archistic actions are punished most The seniors will be given their sented on Michigan's newly organized
severely, and all news of them is sup- choice of two electives. Course 1 deals cosmopolitan soccer team. Of course,
pressed. (Continued on page 6.) the methods of attack will not re-

nage

SANn TO HA

uiI U I U I
Campus Vaudeville Psi
With Students any
From Bald-Head
To Skylig.
NUMEROUS HEADLIN
HOUSE IN CONTINI
Entertainers Show Pro:
Performance Was
Blemish
The band will go to
Withi Hill auditorium

'I rll

pacity, enthusiasm running ramp
in the audience, and professionahi
marking the efforts of the 180 p
formers, there can be no doubt tI
Soldiers' Field will reecho to I
strains of the "Victors," and that I
entertainment surpassed in excellem
any of its kind ever staged in Mic
gan.
From sta.rt to finish the "Big Ba
Bounce" fulfilled every expectati
Not an unsmooth feature marred I
perormance and each number .
encored many times. N
The band scored the hit of the ev
ing at the start, with their master:
rendering of not only Michigan son
but of concert pieces. "Phe Lf
Cavalry," and "Adele" were the t
numbers played, of' which "Ade
awoke the audience to -vociferous
plause by the manner in which it .
given.
Lewinstein, '17M, L. 0. Aldrich, '11
in their saxaphone encore for the ba
turned that .number into one o t
hits of the evening.
C. S. Lamb, '18, recited several hu:
orous monologues and prefixed cle
introductions as pictures of the foi
ball men were cast upon the sore
The chorus of the "Hamburger Sho'
was well received,
Durward Grinstead, '14-'17L, liv
up to his reputation as animpersor
tor of feminine charms in his "Patll
and Powder Puffs." He was forc
to appear three or four times exti
before the cheering stopped.
Yost" and "Strongheart as rend<
ed by Fred Lawton, '11, were acco
ed enthusiastic support and Lawt
had to return to several encores.
Was accompanied by "Eddie" How
'13E,of Flint.
The Mandolin club came in for
share of the hits of the evening in
playing of "Ceceie." The string a
,sts received an ovation which nec
sitated an encore by the qutnte
composed of Forsythe, '17E, Wheel
'15E, Johnson, '15E, Aldich, '17E, a
Mills, '5E.
H. L. Nutting, '1L, scored heavya
plause in his character recital of "'T
Raven" and the encore "Lascar,"
excellent voice being particularly :
ticeable.
The Glee club made a decided :
pression. with the singing of Ch
Sikes, '15E, and the "Midnight Sc
Quartette." The *size of the club
greater than last year andthe matei
better as shown in the singing. il
wonderful voice was fully exhibited
the singing of "College Days" and
reception by the audience was in p
portion.
The entertainment concluded
the singing of "The Yellow and BI
by the entire assembly.
Will Find Ilts
chi ga n' s Socce
semble the customary hurling of n
siles or the heaving of destruct
bombs but the idea of complete a
hilation will be- the real innftive;
The Michigan State Nornial Sch
of Ypsilanti will be the first oppon
to withstand the deadly charge
Coach McCall's proteges. The te
which will be chosen to defend
laurels of Michigan must include
names of natives of many nati
and while the loss of a Chinesea
Jap from the roster of 1913 woa
seem to decrease the number f r
resented nations, several new r
have made the squad this y'ear.

team will be one of the most cosi
politan organizations that has e
represented any institution in a
branch of sport.

.,' , I

Many Students Seek Saturday Work
Many student applications for Sat-
urday work, raking leaves and pre-
paring -Ani Arbor's lawns for winter,
have been received by the University
Y. M. C. A. employment bureau, this
week. Residents requiring such work
should communicate with the secre-.
tary, Frank T. Olmstead, '15.

tion
het-

rs' association. hH
rincipal sp'eak- Catholic Club To Hbld Party Tonight
minent part in Catholic club of the university will
ott will return give its first party of the year at St.
lay.. Thomas hall at 7:30 o'clock tonight.
Will De at Harvard:
Will New York Alumni
made provision strictly on an Eastern basis.
eggs to be pre- "The place is Cambridge, which is
ge Museu mof also known as being the place where
after the game,"
gantn inHennery Wordswar Longboat penned
ng up Michigan that deathless ditty, entitled: "And
with Harvard, departing leave behind us, goose eggs
from the last for the Hah-vad team." Tickets will
," published by be necessary for persons without bal-
higan Club in loons. 'As the Crimson is due to be,
up in the air most of the time, the
l," the boosters chance for Michigan ozone men are
ard game will poor.
weather or no. "There will be bells ringing every
n on each team moment. Also the University of Mich-
ire, and head igan Band will be there from Ann{
i provided with Arbor; there will be good speakers;i
.en's compensa- there will be songs apd songs-and
er with fire in- then some real songs-Michigan songs.
vided by The There will be cheers-cheers for the
is 2:00 o'clock, living and tears for those soon to die-
wishing it unl- and plently of Michigan spirit on tap

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