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October 26, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-26

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I

The

MIchlgutli

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MAILED TO ANY
ADDRESS $3.00

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1912.

PRICE FIVE CEN"

i

,

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Fair Sat-
urday.
University Observatory - Friday
7:00 p. m. temperature, 49.2; maxi-
mum temperature 59.8; minimum tem-
perature 36.0; wind velocity, 7 miles.
Withdraws Name from Nomination.
John R. Watkins, '15, who was nom-
inated, for president of the soph lit
class, has withdrawn his name. Wat-
kins was not present at the class meet-
ing and had no intentions of running
for the office.

*
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VOTE FOR PRESIDENT.

...................Taft
( )...............Roosevelt
( )..................Wilson

( )..................Debs
( )..... ...............

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
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*** * * * * * *
Today's Gridiron Struggles.
-0-

*

Michigan vs. Syracuse.
Pennsylvania vs. Lafayette.
Cornell vs. Bucknell.
Princeton vs. Dartmouth.
Yale vs. Washington and Jeffer-
son.
Harvard vs. Brown.
Chicago vs. Purdue.
Minnesota vs. Iowa.
Indiana vs. Northwestern.
* * * * * * * * * *

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UNIVERSITY

PROF. CRAIG
RESIGNS FROM

* Name..............State .......... Department ....

*
*
,*

REGENTS ACCEPT HIS RESIGNA-
TION WITH REGRET; FEAR OF
NERVOUS BREAKDOWN CAUSED
11111 TO'SE VER RELATIONS.
HAS BEENJHERE SINCE 1893.

* , ,

, * * * * * , * , * , *, , , , , , ,

SHAPE

(ran

as

HOLD FINALCL ASS
ELECTIONS TODAY

ASK FOR RELIEF
FROM PAYING TAX

Union Membership Reaches 2,121.
The membership of the Michigan
Union is still rising. Last evening, a
total of 2,121 university men had sign-
d the Union register.A
TBR.MAE

Wasi Popular onl Campus and
Written Several t'reatises
inl His Linle.

Has

E.H, KRAUSIS

ct. 25.-For the
the Syracuse
and aided by a
ind of practice,
a chance to de-

neither
1 lineup
still up
ope.

MADE HEA OF
SUMMER TERM
APPOINTED BY REGENTS TO TAKE
PLACE IMADE VACANT BY AP-
POINTMENT OF ACTING DEAN
J. It. EFFINGER.
NEW INSTRUCTORS GRANTED

All Freshmen Classes Will
Their Officers This
Morning.

Choose I Board

of Regents Consider Petitions
Asking for Refund of
Athletic Fees.
PROBABLY BE GRANTED,

the Sta-
to get ac-

Refuse Petition To Set Aside
Fund For Faculty Club-
House.

Trust

SLIGHT GAIN

erasers
rolvor

the
ttle
Dr-?

Edward H. Kraus, professor of min-
eralogy and petrography, was appoint-
ed as dean of the summer session by
the board of regents at its regular
monthly meeting yesterday afternoon.
Following Dr. J. R. Effinger's appoint-
ment to the acting deanship of the

literary department last year, Prof.
Kraus was placed in charge of the
1912 summer school._

iave a re-
o far. The
d all week
ntinued to
he amount
seen. Be-

Prof. James W. Glover sent in .his
resignation as auditor and controller
of student organizations, and Prof.
Arthur G. Hall, registrar of the liter-
ary department, was appointed to take

sOs . o
:o assis

1.
edule this year1
possible one c
T of the early s
'rinceton, and C
ee weeks is a st
t is no wonder1
en so badly beat
these games h
[e Syracuse sq
spital list andr
ut its best team
the cripples h
nd it is freely p
ge team tomorn
st so far this s
student body r
;ame as the rea

>nee his place.
t in Dr. V. C. Vaughan was appointed by
'er.y the regents to give the specified lec-
ion, tures on eugenics for which an ap-
lght propriation had previously been made.
ap- New Instructors Allowed.
een The matter of additional instructors
in the philosophy department was re-
has ferred to the executive committee with
on- power to act. The department of rhet-
ea- oric was allowed another instructor,
,ar- the total enrollment in that depart-
one ment having arisen from 1,219 last
the year to 1,382 at the present time.
ten. Dr. W. S. Hubbard was chosen sec-
ave retary .of the pharmaceutical depart-
uad ment, and Frank G. Cole was appoint-
has ed as instructor in dentistry. Provis-
a in ion was made for an assistant to pre-
4ve pare the yertebrate fossils collected
re- by Prof. E. C. Case on his trip to Ne-
row vada last summer. The engineering
ea- rhetoric department was granted an-
other instructor. Roy A. McGary was
ec- appointed as instructor in mathemat-
ally ics.

"PEANUT POLITICS" TO BE ABSENT
The remainder of the class elections
will be held this morning. This will
include all freshmen classes and the
junior and soph lits, whose. elections
were postponed from last Saturday on
account of the trip to Columbus. Keen
competition is expected among the
soph lits as all of the principal offices
are contested by many. The junior lit
election will be less interesting be-
cause for some of the offices only one
person was nominated. Freshmen
elections have special campus promi-
nence this year because most all of
the first year classes have followed
the suggestion of their upperclassmen
and have begun their political careers
by declaring in favor of clean politics.
All of the classes are looking for a
heavy vote and hope that the abolish-
ment of 'peanut politics' will have an
influence in this direction. The elec-
tions will be held as follows:
Junior lits, 9:00 to 12:00, west phys-
ics lecture room; soph lits, 9:15 to
12:15, Tappan hall; 'fresh lits, 9:15 to
12:15, Tappan hall, second floor; fresh
engineers, 9:15 to 12:30, room 311;
fresh laws, 9:00 to 12:00, room B;
fresh medics, 12:00 to 12:30, second
floor, east hall; fresh homeops, 11:45
to 12:00, medical building, lecture
room, third floor; fresh dents, 10:00 to
11:00, junior technic room; fresh phar-
mis, chemical building, 9:15 to 12:15,
room 303.
SENIOR GIRLS INAUGURATE
SERIES OF UNION DINNERS.
Dean Myra B. Jordan's annual re-
ception to the senior girls was held
yesterday afternoon in Barbour gym.
As has been the custom in the past
the party partook both of business and
pleasure. Committees Were appointed
to select the play to be given by the
senior girls this yea'r, and to arrange
a program for a series of parties and
socj' eents to bring the members of
class more closely together. An
4nnovation was introduced when it
was decided to hold the dinners at the
Michigan Union during the rest of the
'college year. The first of these will
take place two weeks from tonight.
TAU BETA PI INITIATES
, ELEVEN AT BANQUET.
More than 50 were present at the fif-
teenth initiation banquet of Tau Beta
Pi engineering honorary fraternity,
held last night at the Michigan Union.
Toasts were responded to by Profes-
sors H. C. Anderson, H. J. Goulging,
and V. H. Lane, and J. L. Crane, '13,
J. A. Wde,''13, and Manley Osgood,
'1.
Eleven men were initiated last night:
Prof. W. T. Fishleigh of th faculty, and
the following seniors: J. W. Follin, W.
A. Grove, E. M. Howell, T. F. McGiv-
ney, R. McMath, N. K. Sheppard, C.
M. Smith, S. R. Truesdell, J. 'A. Wade,
and C. E. Wolfstyn.
Kalamazoo Students Form Club.
Eighteen natives of Kalamazoo met
at the Union last night for the purpose
of forming an organization of Celery
city men. Lester F. Rosenbaum was
appointed temporary chairman and
named a committee of three, R. C.
Loughead chairman, andtER.eM. Mum-
ford, and D. K. Strickland to prepare1

WILl1

In accordance with a provision in
the regulations of the blanket tax sys-
tem, by which any student may be ex-
cused from paying the $5.00 athletic
fee on petition to the regents, 24 re-
quests of this nature were considered
by the board of regents at its meeting
yesterday. No definite action was tak-
en on the matter, and the petitions
were referred to the board in control
of athletics for personal investigation.
Most of the petitions asking for a
refund of the athletic fee averred that-
the petitioners were incapacitated for
competition in athletics, or were un-
able for various reasons to enjoy the
privileges of Ferry and Palmer fields.
Inasmuch as the blanket tax resolu-
tion as originally passed by the regents
is particularly liberal in regard to
stundents unable to pay the required
fee, it is probable that most of the pe-
titions will be acted upon favorably
at the next meeting of the regents.
The provision in the blanket tax res-
olution upon which the petitions re-
ceived yesterday were based, reads as
follows: "Provided, that if any student
feels unable to pay such amount, he
or she may have an opportunity, with-
out publicity, to be excused therefrom
by petition to the board of regents."
TICKETS FOR FOURTH UNION
DANCE ARE ALL DISPOSED OF
The fourth of the series of the regu-
lar Saturday night dances at th Mich-
igan Union will be held this evening.
All tickets were sold by 10:00 o'clock
yesterday morning. The chaperones
for the party this evening are: Dean
and Mrs. N. F. Hoff and Mrs. J. A. C.
Hildner.
INTER-SOCIETY LUNCHEONS
ARE FOUND I3LPRACTICABLE
The inter-society luncheons, which
were recently planned to be given
jointly by the various campus honor-
ary societies, have, for the present,
been called off. Arrangements were
made by representatives from each so-
ciety to hold these luncheons at regu-
lar intervals at the Michigan Union.
But it now seems that the Union dates
are so crowded that the members
would find conflicts and would have
too much on their hands. If, however,
at any future time a sufficient number
of organizations wish the luncheons,
they will be provided by the Union
management.
SPECIAL STUNTS FEATURE
SOCIAL AT NEWBERRY HALL
A special program has been arrang-
ed for the joint gathering of the Y.M.C.
A. and the Y. W. C. A. in Newberry
hall tonight at 8:00 o'clock. Several
of the Japanese students under the
auspices of the Cosmopolitan club, will
perform some of the 'stunts' that were
offered in vaudeville this spring dur-
ing the jubilee. Besides this there will
be other features of equal merit sup-
plemented by the usual 'good eats.'
Dean Cooley Exammies Property.
Dean M. E. Cooley has been asked by
the state railroad commission to look
over the valuation list of the physical
property of the Grand Rapids railway.
The dean will give expert opinion upon
the correctness of the various esti-
mates contained in the repot.

Total vote cast...........
Roosevelt ..............
Wilson ............ .
Taft...................
Debs...................
Scattering....... ... .

ONd WILSON

BULL MOOSE LEADER CUI'S FORM-.
i R ('OLLE.E HEAD'S LEAD TO 12
VOTES, IN AN UNUSUAL hEAVY
VOTE.
LITS CAST MOST VOTES
F raternties Sororities and Rooming
Houses May Send in Votes
on Single Sheet.
* * * * * * * * * * * *
" Results of Straw Ballot. *
* -0- *
* Total votes cast..... ....688 *
* Wilson............ . .296 *
* Roosevelt .............. ..284 *
* Taft .. .......... ....79 *
* Debs....... . 25 *
* Chafin......... .......4 *
* *
* Results of 3rd Day Last Spring. *
* '-0-- *

.eason and if Syra-
s game the rest of
z success. It is re-
of a game for the
one will probably
lineup of Michigan.
s showing a great
over the contest
of Syracuse money
ichigan will out-
ut nine pounds to
7olverine backfield
than the ,eastern
will also go into
bstitute quarter as
field generp.ls are
s of the hospital
aches have refused
neup the dopesters
out the probable
seems certain that
will start at ends
Cole in the tackle
he two last named
f them for the Or-

170
60.
57
30
6
17

Prof. Henry A. Sanders was granted
a leave of absence for the second se-
mester, providing that suitable substi-
tutes could be providedto care for
his classes during his absence. Prof.
Sanders expects to go abroad to do
original research work.
Elect Museum Associates.
Messrs. Swayles and Andrews of De-
troit, and C. K. Dodge of Grand Rap-
ids were elected associates in the mu-
seum. This is an honorary position,.
awarded to notable naturalists. Burt
E. Quick was appointed Whittier fel-
low in botany.
Provision was made for the admin-
istration of the James L. Babcock
scholarship fund, for students inter-
ested in music.
A petition from the faculty club ask-
ing that the regents set aside a trust
fund with which to build a clubhouse
for the organization was refused. In
turning down the proposition, the
board reiterated its stand against in-
vesting trust funds in collateral uni-
versity organizations.
Routine matters concerning the fin-
ishing of the Hill auditiorium occupied

* * * * * * * * * * * *
Unusuatlly heavy voting characteriz-
ed the straw ballot contest yesterday,
more than 300 votes being cast. Wilson
still retains his lead, but Roosevelt
again made a cut in its size, so that the
.former college president is but 12 votes
ahead of the Bull Moose leader. The
positions of the rest of the candidates
are unchanged, but inclinations point
to the advance of Debs to third place
unless the -Taft supporters intend cast-
ing a large vote for him on the last
day.
Votes from three new states and four
foreign countries were cast yesterday,
making a total of 36 states that are
represented, as well as six nations.
The departmental vote remains about
the same, the lits are first in number
of votes cast, the engineers second,
while the laws are third, the medics
fourth, and the faculty fifth. The dents,
graduates, pharmics and homeops fol-
low in order.
Roosevelt leads in the lit, engineer-
ing, medic departments and the fac-
ulty, while Wilson is ahead in the oth-
ers.
A feature of the vote yesterday was
the appearance of a solitary ballot for
Bryan. Several ballots were thrown
out yesterday because some students
insist on voting more than once. More
votes were rendered worthless, due to
the fact that no state was given. The
name of the voter, his home state and
department must be signed in the
proper place on the ballot, or the votes
are void.
Fraternities, sororities, and rooming
houses where there are several stu-
dents to one paper may send in their
complete votes on a single sheet of pa-
per, provided that the other conditions
of the contest are lived up to.
Musical Clubs Want Recruits.
Men desirous of trying out for guitar
positions on the mandolin, club may
make arrangements for special exam-
inations by applying to I. E. Lattimer,
'13E. The glee club is in need of more
tenors, and men wishing to try out for
these parts are requested to call up
Richard Simmons, '13L, to secure spe-
cial tryouts.

The resignation of James A. Crai
professor of Semitics and Hellenistic
'Greek in the university since 1893, was
received by the board of regents at its
meeting yesterday afternoon. The res-
ignation was accepted with an expres-
sion of regret on the part of the re-
gents.
Although no definite reason is given
for Prof. Craig's action, it is under-
stood that fear of a nervous break-
down caused im to sever his relations
with the institution which he has
ssrved so faithfully for nearly 20 years.
The resignation did not come altogeth-
er as a surprise,following Prof. Craig's
recent ill health, but it was generally
expected that he might continue his
duties after an extended leave of ab-
sence.
About two weeks ago Prof. Craig
suddenly left Ann Arbor, giving rise to
a rumor that he had mysteriously dis-
appeared. The story proved unfound-
ed, he having gone to Toronto where
his two daughters are in school. At
the time it was announced by Presi-
dent H. B. Hutchins that ,Prof. Craig
had asked for a semester's leave of ab-
sence which had been granted.
During his long service in the uni-
versity, Prof. Craig was one of the
most popular teachers on the campus.
He was recognized as an especially
capable instructor in the Semitic lan-
guages and literatures, and in Hellen-
istic Greek, and he had written sever-
al scholarly treatises in his line of
work.
Dr. J. Leslie French was appointed by
the regents as acting assistant profes-
sor of the Oriental languages to take
the place of Professor Craig for tile
present semester. A permanent suc-
cessor will probably be chosen at an
early date.
R GENTS GRANT
MANY DEGREES-.
Degrees to the number of 88 were
granted by the board of regents, as
follows:
Doctor of Philosophy-Charles W.
Cobb, Frederick M. Foster, Frank C.
Gates, Frank F.Potter, Lambert Thorp.
Master of Arts-Belle Arbour, Mor-
ell B. Baker, Willa N. Brand, Ernest E.
Cody, R. T. Cook, George H. Curtis,
Joseph E. DeCamp, William A. TFer-
guson, Chauncey E. Hope, Fred 'A.
Loew, John Phelan, Jay W. Sexton,
Magdalena Stukey, Rose M. Taylor,
Benjamin H. Turner, John P. Van
Haitsma, Johannas A. Wiggens, Win-
throp R. Wright.
Master of Science-Lena A. Barber.
Bachelor of Arts-Frank W. Acker-
man, Hazel M. Ackley, Warren L. Bro-
die, Wililam H. Qain, Mary L. Chap-
man, Rose M. Coooper, Winfred H.
Doud, Ethel E. Geer, Lois O. Gibbons,
Russell Harness, Don Harrington, Jen-
uie M. Harris, Ada E. Hibbs; Leif
Huseby, Alson L. Hyames, Caroline L.
Kilbourne, Emil J. Lederle, Ruth Lew-
is, L. L. Mellor, Sarah J. Mishler,Wm.
L. Ogden, Paul Reighard, Donald G.
Swarthout, Mattie E. McWrentmore,
Lynn J. Youngs.
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
-William E. Dick, Herbert C. Jussen,
Terrance P. McClear, Harry B. Ram-
age, Floyd E. Remington, Herbert C.
Towle.
Bachelor of Civil Engifleeriig-Rob-
ert E. Backus, Jeremiah J. Collins,
Paul T. Delevan, Howard W. Ford, Hu-
bert G. Hauser, Raymond T. Middle-
ton, Donald G. Morrison, Ruben R. Re-
on.

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