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October 25, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U

The

Michigan

Day ly

! TAILED TO

ADDRESS $

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1912.

PRC

PRICE

(-TWO
ARS 0O

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Friday fair.
University Observatory - Thursday,
7:00 p. in., temperature 44.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
49.6; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding 31.6; average wind velocity
9 miles.

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VOTE FOR PRESIDENT.

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( )...................Taft
S ) ...............Roosevelt
{ )..... ,............ .Wilson

) ............. Debs
( ) .................Cha

[ I

PUZZLE
ling Orange

y, 22
coachv
ciation

NATIONAL CANDIDATES WILL
BE DISCUSSED AT MEETIN4.
Taft, Roosevelt, Wilson and Debs
will be discussed at Webster society
tonight, after which the question of
the adoption of the Aldrich plan of
banking reform will be debated. West
and Fowler will affirm the question
and Fuller and Hopkins will uphold
the negative.
The meeting will begin at 7:45 p.
m. and freshmen especially are in-
vited to attend.
PREPARTIONS
FOR LECTURE

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Name ...... ....... State ......Department.......

A

of, out
aboard
iat con-
t-
ace his
before

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dy to give
play until
e. An ac-
p is possi-
sition, and

COURSE MADE
PROF. W. D. HENDERSON, DIRECT-
OR OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION
COURSE, ARRANGES FOR 300
LECTURES.

SOPHSWIN.GAME
AGAINST BIG ODDS
Putting up one of the pluckiest strug-
gles, against odds, ever shown by a
class eleven, the sophomore engineer
football team defeated their senior riv-
als yesterday afternoon and won an
undisputable claim to the champion-
ship of their department. Outweighed
nearly ten pounds to the man the
sophs were almost continually on the
defensive and kept their last chalk line
unsullied only by the gamiest of fight-
ing at the crucial moments. The great
offensive work of the sophs flashed
only twice during the game but on
both occasions the result showed itself
in the size of their tally. After check-
ing a senior parade, that started im-
mediately following the first whistle,
the second-year men pushed their way
steadily up the field and sent Haddon
over the senior goal line for six points.
Haddon's goal immediately following
brought the total up to seven. Haddon
intercepted a forward pass and raced
70 yards for the final score.
Final score; sophs, 14; , seniors, 0.
Referee: Carpenter; Umpire: Robin-
son; Head-linesman: Kerwin; Time-
keeper: Church.
This afternoon the senior lits will
meet the juniors for the departmentI
title.
DEAN JORDAN TO ENTERTAIN 1
GRADUATE WOMEN TOMORROW

t equal
f back
Boyle,

each

106 LECTURERS ARE NAMED

va

nc-
all Are Arranged With View of Advancing
of Culture; to Acquaint Faculty
ad- With Local Conditions.

FEW RESPOND TO
COMEDY CLUB CALL
The first day of the tryouts for the
Comedy club did not result in as en-
thusiastic an expression from the
management as was the case last year
when fifty Thespians responded to the
first call for material. Whether the
lack in popularity of the annual try-
outs for campus theatricals resulted
because there was not sufficient pub-
licity given to the occasion, the man-
agement is at a loss to know. Twenty
aspirants to histrionic notoriety were
on hand to deliver selections for the
approval of its committee. None of
yesterday's turnout appears to have
had any experience on the professional
stage as was the case last year, but
a number have had campus experience
in the art, and among them were some
who were pronounced especially good.
Continued tryouts will be held for
those who wish to take part in "Mon-
ey," Lytton's comedy, which will be
given this year. The management an-
nounces that no selections will be
made until all have been given a
chance to show what they can do. Try-
outs will be continued today, begin-
ning at 4:00 o'clock in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall.
Liveliest of Comedies is Anticipated.
* With the exceptional material which
took part in last year's play, "The
Magistrate," by Pinero, and with the
addition of some stars which it is ru-
mored are lying low at present, the
club anticipates to produce one of the
liveliest comedies which has ever been
given. Earnest work will start when,
the tryouts are completed. The books-
are, at present, in the hands of the
club, and nothing will prevent those
selected from beginning work in time
to put on this year's production, which,
will probably be staged at a date be-c
fore Christmas.As has been the custom
in past years, the Thespians will foot
the boards for the delectation of the
fair visitors who will attend this year's
Junior Hop.
LIT-LAWS ALLOWED VOTE IN
FRESH LAW CLASS ELECTION
Senior Lits in Comisned Course Cani
Cast Ballot in BothI
Departments.

NO MORE SUBMERGED WALKS
FOR CAMPUS PEDESTRIANS.
2,0 feet of Concrete Repair Made;
Tunnel to Auditorium
is Complete.
Campus pedestrians will not be in-
timidated by shallow lakes and miry
pools this winter on their way. to and
from classes. For three weeks, work-
men, under the direction of Supt.
James Marks, have been engaged rais-
ing those portions of the campus walks
that have in past winters been sub-
merged during heavy rains and melt-
ing snows. In all, more than 2,600
feet of concrete repair has been made.
The Hill Memorial auditorium has
been connected to the network of tun-
nels penetrating the campus by a tun-
nel opening from the one whichsup-
plies the law building. The new tunnel
measures 504 feet and is being wired
and piped to suliply the auditorium
with light and heat.
PLANANOTHER
WESTERN TOUR
FOR MUSICIANS
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF MU-
SIC AL CLUBS READ LE TTERS
WHICH ASSURE A LONG TRIP
THIS YEAR.

300

VOT E

STRAW

WILSON STILL

-.I

NEW JERSEY CANDII
CUT DOWN TO 14 0
VELT; TAFT RUNS
AM\ DEBS FOURTH.

In accordance with a system rapidly.

Vote for Second Day is U
Heavy; is Six Times as 1
as Spring Ballot

LEADS

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Results of Straw Ballot
Total vote cast.......
Wilson...............
Roosevelt.......
Taft.......
Debs.................
Chafin................
Results of Vote on Second
Last Spring.
-0-
Wilson...............
Roosevelt............
Taft................
Debs..................

to

Torbet,
s; Quinn
ser, cen-
eft half;
has fil-
to Ann
Syracuse
will be
Newspa-

being perfected by Prof. William D.
Henderson, the series of extension lec-
tures of the University of Michigan
will be given throughout the state
during the coming year by members
of the university faculty.
Financed by a large appropriation
which the board of regents made for
the purpose last year, the extension
courses were created last year, and so
gratifying were their results that this
year the system was placed on a per-
manent basis with Prof. Henderson as
director. Last season the work was
carried on through the office of the

.e sor- president.
nceton Three hundred lectures will be given
I how- as last year, but the number of lec-
three turers has been increased to 106, and
ers in several new subjects have been intro-
t play duced. Each lecturer will fill from
s, and one to ten dates.
y are Cities Are Arranged in Circuits.
[1 give More than 50 lectures will be given
battle in the upper peninsula, and in order
to minimize traveling expenses, the
different cities have bepn ar-
E ranged in circuits of from five to sev-
[GHT. en cities each. While in the peninsula,
the speakers will cover an entire cir-
epart- cuit before returning to Ann Arbor.
p fire The circuits will be known as the
imber copper country, Marquette, Escanaba,
given and Ironwood circuits.
. The The system now in operation is sim-
pecial ilar to that conducted by many state
npers universities. The university bears all
ing at expense except such as is incurred In
connection with the rental of halls.
Local committees from alumni associ-
ations, women's clubs, and Y. M. C. A.s
[DLY. take charge of the work in their own
city. The director is especially desir-
rnices ous this year to obtain reliable com-
g rap- (Continued on page 3.)

Dean Myra B. Jordan will entertain
about fifty graduate women at an in-
formal reception at her home, tomor-
row afternoon, at 4:00 o'clock. As the
graduate women come from all parts
of the country and from many differ-
ent institutions, this opportunity is
afforded them of becoming acquainted
with one another. Mrs. H. B. Hutch-
ins, Mrs. J. R. Effinger, and Mrs. C. F.
Guthe, will help receive.
THREE PALEFACES SMOKE
PEACEPIPE OF MICHIGAMUA
There are two less palefaces in the
white man's country as a result of
Michigamua's return to the trail last
night. The new bucks in the ranks of
the tribe are Harold McGee, '13E, and'
Don Denison, '13. Athletic Director
Philip G. Bartelme also gave up his
paleface rights for an honorary sach-
emship. Sachems Cooley and Wenley
gave pow-wow talks in the wigwam,
following a venison roast.
This is the smallest number of young
bucks ever taken in by the tribe in an
annual fall election.
PICTURESQUE PALESTINE IS

CLUBS MAY ALSO GO EAST
Although no Definite Action has Been
Taken, Plans Will Probably be
Announced 6oon.
According to letters read at a meet-
ing, of the executive committee of the
musical clubs, held last evening, an-
other western trip is practically assur-
ed for the combined clubs this year.
There is also said to be a possibility
of an eastern tour, but as yet no defi-
nite plans for this have been made.
It is understood that a practical du-
plication of the Pacific coast trip,
which was taken at the expense of the
Santa Fe Railroad last Christmas, will
be offered under similar conditions by
some railway system this year. Since
the Santa Fe. railroad inaugurated the
idea of sending college glee clubs over
its route to give entertainments for its
employees in isolated points, a number
of other systems have adopted the plan,
and every year some eight or ten clubs
from various colleges make the tour.
Besides entertaining the Michigan club
last winter, the Santa Fe gave the trip
to the glee and mandolin clubs repre-
senting Beloit College, Wisconsin, and
Northwestern University.
While the Michigan clubs have taken
no definite action on the matter of a
trip, it is expected that this year's
tour will be announced in a short time.
COMMITTEE TO CANVASS FOR
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB MEMBERS

According to the constitution of the
fresh law class, senior lits who are
carrying a majority of their work in
the law department are entitled to vote
with the fresh laws at their class,
election tomorrow, providing they pay.
their dues to the class. Although fac-
ulty sentiment seems to be against
the practice of voting with both class-

Nearly 300 votes
day in the straw ba
Wilson is still lead
Roosevelt gained fiv
New Jersey candida
14. Taft is running
Debs, with 13 vote
Chafin has fifth plac

contest was, unusually heavy,
over six times the number of b
that were polled on the second d
the straw ballot held last spring
that time Wilson had a lead c
three votes.
Departments are Strong for One
An interesting fact to note con
ing the vote, is the vote by de
inents. The lits, laws andi dent
strong for Wilson, while the engi
medics, and faculty are supp
Roosevelt strongly. The gra
school is divided between the two
ers, while the homeops are di
among Wilson, -Roosevelt and Ta
Voters from 31 states, two coup
and one territory cast ballots y
day.
Several.ballots were thrown oi
cause of the' fact that a few pe
attempted to vote more than one
few ballots were also discarde
cause the voter neglected to sig
naie to the ballot. It must be re
bered that the voters must sign
names, as well as .tlieir depart
and the state in which they live.
LECTURES ON LATIN AXE]
Dr. Lima Addresses Large Crow
South American. University
Movement.
Dr. Olivera Lima, former amb
dor from Brazil to Belgium, addr
an audience of over two hundred
ple in the economics lecture room
terday afternoon on, "The Indel
ence of Latin America and its E
tion in the Nineteenth Century."
In his lecture, Dr. Lima stated
the university movement in B
Chili, and the Argentine Republic
pattern after the typical univer
of the United States, and that, v
ever might be said ,to the contrary
ucation in these republics is most
ern and efficient..
ENTHUSIASM IS DISPLAYED
AT WILSON CLUB MEET
Great enthusiasm was shown a
meeting of the Wilson club -last
at the Michigan Union when about
hundred democrats turned out.
chairman, Registrar A. G. Hall, i
duced the two speakers, W. H. H
ton and "Morrie" Toulme. Mr. H
ton spoke of the issues of the
paign and a short address by To
followed. An announcement was :
that next Tuesday the members

TRANSPORTED TO ARMORY. es in the elections there is no techni-
cal reason why it cannot be done.
Palestine, with its hills and dales, "It is optional with the student,"
quaint buildings and still quainter cos- said Registrar Hall, in speaking of the
tumed inhabitants was transported as correct classification of these students
if by some genii to the hall of the Ar- yesterday, 'whether they vote with the
mory last night. The occasion was the class with which they entered college
Holy Land Exposition, directed by or with the fresh 'laws. I do not think
Miss Ben-Oliel, and brought here by they should vote with both classes,
the city Y. M. C. A. though I know no reason why they
Miss Ben Oliel illustrated the life should not do so."

the

1ewberry Hall.
an association
>morrow even-
.'clock in New-
s are invited.
es Tonight.

Kazoo Students to Form Club Tonight
Students from Kalamazoo, attend-
ing the university, will meet tonight at
7:30 at the Michigan Union for the
first time to consider plans for an or-
ganization to include all men living in
the Celery city. The purpose of the
club will be to boost Michigan in Kala-
mazoo and to boost the Celery city at
the university. All Kalamazooites are
urged to be present.
Prof. Bunker Gives Bust to Society.
Prof. Robert E. Bunker, of the law
department, has given a bust of Henry
Clay to Jeffersonian society. The
formal presentation will be made to-

Seventeen nations are represented
on the propaganda committee of the
Corda Fratres Cosmopolitan clubs of
which C. C. Glover, '12 P, is chairman.
The committee will make a canvass of
all the foreign students in the univer-
sity with the view of enrolling a large
number of them in the club.
The canvass will be commenced
Monday, and continued several weeks.
The idea of such a committee was con-
ceived at the opening of school this
fall, and is a unique departure in the
activity of the Cosmopolitan club to
gain recruits. If the venture is suc-
cessful, other chapters of the Corda
Fratres association of Cosmopolitan
clubs may follow Michigan's example
in their respective universities.
October Gargoyle to Be Out Soon.
The October issue of the Gargoyle,
which was to have been put on sale
this noon will not be out until Mon-
day. The delay has been, caused by
the rushed condition of the Ann Ar-
bor Press.
Board of Regents Meet Today.
The regular monthly meeting of the
board of regents will be held today in
the regents room in the law building.
Only matters of routine business will
he disensed.

of the country using her "converted"
natives for the setting and as a finish
married one of the prettiest damsels to
the biggest chieftain. The exposition
will continue the remainder of the
week.
Prof. Carney Talks on Ancient Lakes.
Prof. Frank Carney gave a stereop-
ticon lecture before the geological sem-
inary students last night on "Ancient
Lakes of Northern Ohio." Prof. Car-
ney has made a special study of the
subject, and with the aid of his slides
presented some exceedingly interest-

Grand Rapids Club Will Hold Smoker.
All students from Grand Rapids are
invited to attend the Grand Rapids
club smoker at 8:00 o'clock tonight
at the Union. Plans for the coming
year will be discussed.
Law Grad Practices in Detroit.
William S. McCormick, '12L, has
commenced the general practice of
law at 918 Ford Building, Detroit.
While at Michigan McCormick was a
member of the student council, and
president of his class during his jun-
ior year.

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