100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 24, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CAL AT YOUR
DOOR $2.50

The

M ichigan

Daly

it

flAILED TO ANY
AD DEAS 13. 0

I woolimift

XXIII, No. 20.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1912.

PRICE FIVE

I WRITERS
IRlY NAILED'

THE WEATHER MAN

*
*
*
*
*

* * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

VOTE FOR PRESIDENT.'

Forecast
night and
row.

for Ann Arbor-Clear to-
Friday. Warmer tomor-

AS FALSEHOOD
IN SIGNED STATEMENT COACH
FIELDING It. YOST DENIES IM-
PLICATION THAT HE PROTEST-
ED CHESTER MINDS.
MAY CREATE BAD FEELING
Claim Was That Yost Protested Minds
Because He Had Played
Football Fie Years.
Somewhere in the limits of the city
of Philadelphia lives a sport writer
who has the imagination of a Mun-
chausen combined with the avowed in-
tention f causing as much trouble be-
tween the universities of Michigan
and Pennsylvania as a human being
is capable of doing. Last year there
was considerable friction between the
two schools over the article appearing
in one of the Philadelphia papers con-
cerning the cleanness of the tactics
of the schools. Now, just two weeks
before the annual battle comes a dis-
patch deliberately misquoting Coach
Yost and relating an alleged protest
of a Pennsy player that is a deliber-
ate and unqualified falsehood, as the
popular phrase goes.
According to a dispatch from Phil-
adelphia, dated yesterday morning'
and published in the Detroit papers,
Coach Yost has written to the Penn-
sylvania authorities protesting the
playing of Chester Minds, backfield
Quaker star, on the ground that he has
played five years. The dispatch goes
on to state that although the protest
will not be noticed it will not make
the feeling between the two schools
at all friendly. The article is written
in the most vitriolic fashion and is ev-
idently aimed to cause a break of
some kind between the two universi-

, ( )...................Taft
* ( ) .................Roosevelt

( ) .....................lDebs
( ) ,.. ..................Chlfin
{ ) ..........................

University Observatory-Wednesday
7:00 p. m. temperature 41.4; maximum
temperature 49.4; minimum temper-
ature 36.2; wind velocity 8 miles.
COMEDY CLUB MAY CHOOSE
CASTE FROM TRYOUTS TODAY
Aspirants are again reminded that
try-outs for the Comedy club will be
held this afternoon at 4:00 o'clock, in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, and contin-
ued tomorrow at the same time and
place, if the number of persons try-
ing out makes that necessary. Can-
didates are asked to come prepared,
if possible, with some short selection.
The play to be given this year is Bul-
wer Lytton's "Money." Manuscripts
for members of the cast have already
been received.
OVER.,200 MEN-
TURN OUT FOR.
UNION OPERA
NUMBER OF TRYOUTS IS LARGER
THAN EVER BEFORE, BUT MORE
MEN WILL BE NEEDED THIS
YEAR THAN IN PAST.

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

*
*
*

( ) ..............Wilson

* Name..................... State.......... Department .......
*

* * * * *

* * * .* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

"Koanzaland" to be Produced at the University of est Virginia and "The
Crimson Chest" by a Professional Company in Chicago.
Closely following the first call for the Union opera enthusiasts, comes
the news of the further successes of some of the past productions. One of
the earliest ones is to be produced at another university, while a more recent
one is to be the object of a professional venture.

"Koanzaland."
"Koanzaland," the third Union op-
era, which was staged three years ago,
is to be reproduced at the University
of West Virginia. The glee club is the
organization assuming the responsibil-
ity of the undertaking and Mr. Earl
Van Dyke is the director.
Just how many times the perform-
ance will be given, and the exact time
of production is uncertain. The songs
will be slightly changed, to bring in
local hits. Aside from this, the pro-
duction will be as near like the local
presentation as possible. Even the
scenery and costumes used by the Vir-
ginians are the same as the Union had.
The Mimes, by the sali of these prop-
erties, will be enabled to purchase en-
trely new costumes and scenery
for this year's opera. z

"The Crimson Chest."
"The Crimson Chest," fourth Union
opera, is the one which is to be pro-
duced on the professional boards, if
present negotiations are successful.
Bert St. John, of Detroit, is the pro-
ducer interested. Last summer mat-
ters went so far that actual rehearsals
were given in New York; but at the
last moment "Th( Isle of Spice" was
given the preference.
A number of changes have been
made in the opera. Only the most pop-
ular airs have been retained, includ-
ing "My Dear," "Bum Armie," and
"Take Me Back to College." The orig-
inal plot is retained in the rewrite, but
the minor lines and situations have
been arranged in such a way that the
entire opera may be given by 22 per-
sons, with seven principals, in an hour
and a half. It will probably be pro-
duced in Chicago some time in Novem-
ber.

When the article reached Ann Arbor
this morning there was considerablej
comment and the article was taken
straight to Yost. He disclaimed all
knowledge of the matter, as did Direc.
tor Bartelme and Yost issued the fol'
lowing statement over his signature'
"She's certainly a charming girl-
at reast she's been around here long
There is absolutely nothing in
the report that I or the Michigan
authorities, who would have
charge of such matters, have pro-
tested Chester Minds or any other
Pennsylvania player. The matter
of the eligibility of the Pennsylva-
nia men rests entirely with them.
We have every confidence in
their decision in such matters. I
might add that this is the first
time that I ever heard that Minds
had ever played football at Dick-
inson College.
FIELDING H. YOST.
Thus it can clearly be seen that the
article was a wild fabrication, unbased
on any facts, and written with the'
sole idea of creating a feeling between
the two schools. It is absurd to im-
agine that the Pennsylvania authori-
ties ever gave out such information,
and it is clear that the article was
written without even their knowledge.
And yet the fact that the writer is
close enough to Pennsy athletics to
know the record of their men gives an
inkling that the author must be some
sport writer who has followed the
team and has an intimate knowledge
of conditions there.
It is indeed a crying shame that two
great universities, who have played
for some years with the greatest of
rivalry and good feeling, cannot con-
tinue their relations without some
cheap sport writer of a newspaper in
no way connected with Pennsylvania
sending false reports all over the coun-
try in order to humiliate one of the
teams and cause a.break in relations.
Last year one of these articles cast
reflections on Pennsy and this year
Michigan's coach is misquoted. Both
articles were made of the same whole
cloth and both written with the same
intention. Philadelphia newspaper tac-
tics must indeed be of a kind that dis-

MANY PARTS TO BE FILLED
Another Meeting for Chorus Tryouts
Will Be Held This Week-
Work to be Assigned.
That the 1913 Michigan Union opera
will not suffer for lack of talent was
made plain last evening when over 200
men attended the preliminary meeting
called to discuss plans for the presen-
tation. No tryouts were held, but the
men present were asked to fill out
cards giving their experience, part de-
sired, weight and height. These will'
be sorted and filed, and work in the
'respective lines of dramatic endeavor
assigned at a later date.
The number in attendance at last
evening's meeting exceeded all expec-
tations, and was by far the largest
ever present at any preliminary try-
out for a Union opera. The large num-
ber of parts to fill in this year's show,
however, demands that the material
be plentiful, and any men not able to
attend the meeting last night, who
wish to try out, will have a chance
next week to fill out the required cards
and receivel instructions.
There were 16 men at last evening's
session who registered for singing cast
parts, while 40 aspired to tread the
boards in dramatic men's parts, and
only three in "fem" roles. Eight men
signed up for orchestra positions, ands
35 were willing to go through the tor-
tures of French heels and various un-
mentionables to join the dancing chor-
us. Applicants for broiler jobs num-
bered 25, and 45 more were willing to
vocalize their way to positions on the
singing chorus.
A second meeting of all tryouts for
the chorus will be held next Wednes-
day evening at 7:00 o'clock at the. Un-
ion, and at this time actual work will
be assigned. The next meeting of men
wishing to try out for cast positions
will take place November 6th, 'before
which date all tryouts will be expected
to the soccer men as a regular club
present before the Mimes.
The five men who are managing the
initial tryouts, headed by' General
Chairman Philip Fletcher, '13E, will
meet next week and choose the men to
fill the numerous committee positions
for the opera.

TOD START SOCCER, ABBOTT, ELECTED
PRACTICE TODAY SENIOR LIT HEAD
Soccer football was the oause of At the special senior lit election for
bringing together last night, in the tro- president yesterday afternoon, Harold
phy room of Waterman gymnasium, B. Abbott received a slight majority
twenty-five students interested in the over Selden Dickinson. The election
P was held on account of a failure to
game, who will pull to make it a per- oa a or a t th aal-
' . obtain a majority at the regular. bal-
manent branch of Michigan inter-class lot last Saturday.
athletics. A special election for junior law
The first practice was announced at president will be held this afternoon
3:00 p. m. today. The bunch is ex- from 5:00 to 6:00 p. m. in room B.
The candidatesarE.WHispan
pected to turn out three times a week R. Mnydeare E. W. Haislip and
R. M. Snyder. The junior and soph
on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thurs- lits and all freshmen classes will elect
days at 3:00 p. in. for a practice of Saturday. The fresh law election will
about an hour and a half. The grounds be held in room B. from 9:00 to 12:00
are the part of South Ferry field, back o'clock. The fresh engineers will
elect in room 311 from 9:15 to 12:30.
of the Varsity baseball diamond.. Following are the fresh engi-
The outfit usually worn in the play- neer nominations which were com-
ing of soccer consists of gym shirts, pleted at a meeting last night.
track pants, heavy woolen stockings, E President, N. D. Haag, and Paul
extending above the knees and shoes 4Wagner; vice-president, S. Holloway,
R. Fife, H. E. Groves, and O. O. Lein-
exactly like our better known foot- finger; secretary, S. K. Hirth and W.
ball boots. If a sufficient number at- Mertz; treasurer, B. Chatsfield, C.
tend the first work out,the old locker Bastion, J. H. Smith, and E. McAllis-
building will be fixed up and assigned ter; baseball manager, Harold Hicks,
to he soccer men as a regular club and R. Wylie; basketball manager, K.
house. Until then all not having lock- A. Raymond, Jack Sinkenstaedt, and
ers at the new locker house intend to Frank Von Achen;track manager, Day.

FACULTY MEN AND STUDENTS
TO SPEAK AT WILSON CLUB
W. J. Hamilton of the economics de-
partment, Registrar A. G. Hall, L. P.
Haller and "Morrie" Toulme, news
editor of The Michigan Daily, will be
the principal speakers at the meeting
of the Wilson club to be held this ev-
ening at 8:00 o'clock in the Union
club rooms. The coming of George B.
McClellan, October 29th, 1912, will be
the main topic of discussion. On this
night a parade of the student body
will be held.
Zoologists Get New Equipment.
Another microtome has been added
to the equipment of the zoological lab-
oratories for the use of the faculty.
The new machine is the latest model,
and is capable of cutting sections from
1 to 60 microns in thickness. Although
the older machines are capable of the
same degree of fineness, the newer one
has many features whih make it
much more valuable and useful to
work with.
VARSITY, GETS
THREE TALLIES
FIRST STRING TEA1M DOES NO
STAR 1OWEVER, AND SCORES
CAME AS RESULT OF LINE BUCK-
ING WITH CYRIL QUINN AT
FULL.
BARTON MAY PLAY CENTER
Team Leaves for Syracuse Toight
And Yost Will Take 22 Play-
er to Defend Miciln<
The scrubs and the Varsity battled
in the dark at Ferry field yesterday
afternoon in the last scrimmiage be-
fore the Syracuse game. It wasn't an
inspiring exhibition and the shivering
rooters were not imbued with a in-
growing confidence over the result
next Saturday. Yost used a new
string of backs and a xew center, leav-
ing Craig and Thomson on the side
lines and without those two ground
gainers in there may be some excuse
for the showing.
It took the Varsity over forty min-
utes to tally three times on the sec-
ond string but at the same time the
Scrubs themselves came within a few
feet of scoring and threw a
real scare into the first
choice. By a series of end runs
and one trick play they carried the
ball to the Varsity fifteen yard line
from far down the field and only that
a place kick went wrong stopped them
from tallying. The Varsity touch-
downs all came as a result of consis-
tent linebucking in which Cyril Quinn,
playing at full, was the particular star.
In fact the Quinn brothers put on a
double skit, one at full and the other
at guard, that completely eclipsed the
rest of the entertainment.
Yost started the Varsity with Mus-.
ser at center, Almendinger and Quinn
at guards, MacHale and Cole at tack-
les, and Torbet and Pontius holding
down the ends. Bushnell played quar-
ter with Collette and Boyle at halves
and Cyril ,Quinn at full. Boyle did not
show up to great advantage and seem-
ed unable to get started, due to some
extent to failing to follow his inter-
ference. Collette played well and
Musser did fair, while Almendinger
kept up his streak of great work. On

defense the line, due in great part to
the stellar work of Quinn and Almen-
dinger was great but the work of the
ends was not at all what it should be.
Young, playing quarter on the scrubs,
skirted the ends for big gains and seV-
eral times nearly got clear.
The list of men who will leave for
Syracuse tonight has been given out
and the squad is larger than was ex-
pected, twenty-two players being pick-;
ed. Tessin, who was recently promot-
ed from the scrubs will make the trip
although it is not predicted that he
will play. Another tip was handed
out yesterday that looks exceedingly
probable and that is that although
Musser will start at center, if he is

NEW JERSEY GOVERNOR HA
VOTES, 19 MORE THAN RO
VELT, SECOND CANDIDA
TAFT GETS 13 AND DEBS 1.
TOTAL OF BALLOTS IS
Twenty-one States and Foreign (
try are Represented in
..Yesterday's Vote.

With the first day of the straw
lot showing a total of 89 votes, C
ernor Wilson has a lead of 19 v
over Roosevelt, the next candid
Taft is in third place, 15 votes bel
the leader of the Bull Moosers,
Debs is last, with one solitary vot
his credit.
The vote was heavy for the first
but many ballots were thrown a'
because the voter did not adher
the rules of the contest. Every v
must sign his name, department,
the state in which he lives on the' p
es indicated for them In the ha
Also, official ballots must be u
Many votes were thrown away
cause the person merely wrote
name of the candidate on a slip of
per. Remember, every student
member of the faculty has, the r
to vote, but in voting the rules n
be observed.
Twenty-one states and one for
countrywere represented in the c
yesterday, with Michigan having
far the largest vote, and Illinois
Ohio next in order. The greatest n
ber of votes came from student
the literary department. The l
were next in the number of v
cast, while the engineers, medics,
faculty were closely bunched,
the dents and graduates far in
rear.
The ballot appears again this m
ing, and everyone is encouraged
vote early as The Michigan D
wishes to find the true sentimen
the students regarding the appro
ing election.
UNION DANCE TICKETS WILL
GO ON SALE THIS AFTERN(
Tickets for the fourth Saturday n
membership dance at the Michigan
ion will go on sale at the Union o
at 5:00 o'clock this afternoon. As
been the custom during the past t
weeks, the admission cards will
limited to 100. Anyone attending t
dances must be a member of the
ion, and absolutely no one will be
mitted to the floor unless he 'h
dance ticket.
The committee in charge of the
ty this week is: George Caulkins,
,hairman; Raymond P. Blake, '
and Bruce Miles, '14.
TWO CHINAMEN ARE ENROLLE]
IN LAW SCHOOL THIS YE
Only two Chinamen are enrolle
the law department this year. T
Wong is a junior and G. S. 0. Che
a freshman. Chen, who was in
graduate school the year before
was a practicing attorney In Cl
for six years before coming here
en years ago.
"The laws of this country are il
different from the laws of mine,"
said yesterday. "Most of our laws
criminal ones and an attorney tI
has much more practice in the cr
nal courts than in any of the 01
courts.' Our land laws, too, wt
seem very odd to an American."
Hang Picture of '12 Law Class
The class picture of last year's
ior laws has been hung in a cons
uous place in room D of the law bu
ing. It is finished in sepia brown

DAY'S DALI

WILSON TAKES
LEAD IN FIRST

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

* * , , * * , , , *
Results of Straw Vote Contest.
--0-
Wilson . ..............47
Roosevelt.. ... ........28
Taft........13
Debs.................... 1

dress at the gymnasium.
Coach Douglas has written to one
of the Detroit soccer clubs, requesting
them to send out one of their members
the first of next week to talk to theI
university beginners.
If the athletic association receives
any encouragement from the student
body in regard to soccer, they will
plan to form a regular inter-depart-
mental schedule and award sweaters
and numerals to the members of the
winning team. But-on the other hand
if this fall's turn-out is small they will
not find it profitable to continue with
their plans.
Will Leave Giant Oak Standing.
The giant oak tree that stands alone
in front of the new auditorium will
not be cut down, as might be popular-
ly supposed, but will be allowed to re-
main standing, and will be given a new
foundation of cement to assure its
remaining in perfect condition.

Carman Smith, and Franklin

Arm-I

strong.
Recent fresh pharmic nominations
are as follows: president, R. F. Smith,
D. P. Rice, and W. L. Seibert; vice
president, C. E. Pitkin, and V. F. Mc-
Intyre; secretary, J. K. Lilly, Jr.;
treasurer, E. H. Woodhouse and C. W.
Crysler; athletic manager, T. S. Am-
by, and R. M. McGregor.
Choral Union has Maximum Seat Sale
All previous records were broken
yesterday in the Choral Union series,
when the total number of reserved
SchumannHeink concert. Approxi-
mately over a hundred seats remain
unsold, and it is expected that these
will go in the next few days.
Prof. Barbour Confined at His Home.
Professor W. T. Barbour, of the
law department, has been confined at
his home for several days with a se-
vere attack of tonsilitis. He expects
to meet his classes as usual today.

Prof. Carney Talks at Museum Tonight
Prof. Frank Carney will give a lec-
ture before the geological seminary
this evening at 7:00 p. m. in the Rus-
'sel seminary room of the museum.
His subject will be, "Shore Lines of
the Ancient Lakes of Northern Ohio."
The general public. and the students
in other departments who are interest-

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan