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October 22, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2. YOUR
$2.50

I

The

Michigan

Daly

I AILED TO ANY
ADDRESS $3.00

No. 18.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1912.

PRICE FIVE G

ONTIUS MAY

TAKE BARTON'S
PACEA ENDA
OOTBAL E DOPESTERS PREDICT
YOST WILL EFFECT CHANGES IN
LINE AS RESULT OF LAST SAT-
IJRDA'S CRAME.

NEW COMBINATION

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Increasing
cloudiness, with some chance for rain,
followed Tuesday by fair and colder
weather.
University Observatory - Monday,
7:00 p. m, temperature 61.4; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
71.8; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 41.0; average wind veloci-
ty, 6 miles.
Typhoid Takes Former Undergraduate
Word has been received here of the
death a few days ago of Harry G. Mes-
en'felder, '15, at his home at Rock
Island, Illinois. He did not return to
the University this year on account of
illness. He died of typhoid fever.
DAILY iS TO
CONDUCT BIG

The Big Rake

EXPECTED.J

P(R)CT ZI -1 1~ I
WHY NOT CLEAN THE WHOLE CAMPUS?

* * *E,* * S S*

*

Below is the list of boarding
houses using boiled water, re-
vised.up to date. If your board-
ing house is not in this list yet
keep on asking until the keeper
of your eating place serves you
with boiled water.
McCain's, Green's,Swartout's,
Hurlbuart's, Wuerth's, Chubb's,
Tuttle's Cutting Cafe,, Prtty-
man's, Linda Vista, Benjamin's,
Walker's, The Pines, Paris Cafe,
Brennan's,Lumbert's, Freeman's,
Merkel's, Club Lunch Room,
Cobb's, Wolverine, King's, Chap-
man's, Park's, McKay's, Dakin
House, Ottmer's, Campus Point
Cafe, Kidd's, Ideal Restaurant,
Mrs. Wightman's.
* * * * * * * * *

.
'3
"
.1'
.*

AT ELECTI

With Many Regulars Missing, Scrubs
Make Scores in Yesterday's
Practi c Scrimmage.
Those who are following the affairs
of the Michigan football team closely
are predicting a change at the extrem-
ity positions as the result of the Ohio
State battle at Columbus Saturday. To
the layman, the showing of the Michi-
gan line from end to end was merito-
rious in comparison with the two pre-
ceding games and practices, but it is
evident that there were a few features
in Saturday's play which only Coach
Yost took cognizance of.
The shift which is predicted at the
extreme end positions is nothing less
than making Pontius permanent right
end in place of Barton, and giving Tor-
bet the wing position left vacant by
moving Pontius. Barton's ability in
pulling down forward passes has been
counted on to hold him a life berth at
right end, but those who are close to
Coach Yost say that even these quali-
ties may not prevent the predicted
shift.
It is understood that Yost was not
satisfied with the way in which Barton
performed his duties in the Ohio game
when Michigan had the ball. It is not
thought the failure of Barton to lo-
cate Thomson's aerial heaves had
much to do with this dissatisfaction,
because Thomson made poor throws in
several instances, while the aggress-
iveness of the Ohio players in prevent-
ing the Michigan men from reaching
the ball as it sailed in the air had
much to do with the failure of the for-;
ward passes to materialize. It was
rather, it is thought, Barton's failure to
hit the opposing tackles.
As all who know the game of foot-
ball realize, it is part of the duty of
the offensive end to block the opposirg
tackle. This, it is understood, Barton
failed to do to the satisfaction of Coach
Yost. As a result some believe Yost
will at least give the new Pontius-
Torbet combination a thorough trial
before the next game.
Yesterday's practice at Ferry field
did not see the Michigan team of regu-
lars in action. Yost had a number of
second string men in the game, chief
among whom were Wright at center in
place of Paterson, whose injury in the
State game is laying him up for a num-
ber of days. Boyle at halfback, Bush-
nell at quarter and Tessin at end.
With several of the regulars out of the
lineup, the scrubs were able to score
against the Varsity on two different
occasions..
Several changes are scheduled to be
made in the personnel of the Varsity
squad. It is understood that Yost is to
send Stone, Paisley, Wilson and Bleich
back to the scrubs, and to shift Tessin
from the scrub team to the Varsity.
First Musical Faculty Recital Given.
Miss Nell B. Stockwell gave a piano
recital in the School of Music hall last
evening as the first of a notable series
of recitals by junior members of the
faculty. Miss Stockwell gave an ex-
cellent presentment of a varied and
difficult program ranging from Bach to
Debussy. Her playing is clear-cut in
outline, beautiful in tonal effects, and
finished in interpretation. The recital
was greatly enjoyed.

POLITICS IS
STiLL ABSENT

. I

STRAWBALLOT
SENTIMENT OF STUDENT BODY ON
PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEES WILL
BE OBTAINED BY VOTE DURING
THE WEEK.
DEMOCRATS HAVE WON TWICE.
Will Place Boxes in Campus Buildings
and Collections Are to Be
Made Each Day.
Who is going to be the next presi-
dent of the United States? A settle-
merit of the matter, as far as student
and faculty sentiment can decide, will
be made wi in the next week, as The
Michigan Di ily will conduct a straw
ballot for that purpose.
Every student and member of the
faculty is requested to express his
preference for a presidential candi-
date by voting once, but not more
than that. Furthermore, everyone who
votes, is requested to sign his name
on the ballot, the state where he lives,
and the department in which he is
registered.
The ballots will appear in the paper
every morning until Sunday, begin-
ning with Wednesday's issue. Ballot
boxes will be placed in University hall,
the library, engineering building, law
building, medical building, and the
Michigan Union. The ballots will be
collected daily, and the results will
appear in the paper ever morning.
Next Tuesday the final result will be
given as well as the vote by states and
departments.
The straw ballot held before the
presidential nominations last Spring,
resulted in giving Wilson a lead of 51
votes over T. R., while Debs was third
and Taft fourth. The Wolverine, the
official paper of the summer school, al-
so. held a straw vote last summer,
which ended with Wilson leading the
field by 128 votes. The members of
the Wilson club here are confident that
their man will again lead and Presi-
dent J. H. Van Auken declared that the
club would bend every effort to get all
the Wilson men in school to vote.
COMMIT TEE WILL PLAN FOR
SUNDAY SOCIALS AT UNION.
Pres. Edward G. Kemp has appoint-
ed the following committee to arrange
for the Sunday socials at the Michi-
gan Union: Walter Staebler, '13, chair-
man; Julius Schlotthauer, '14, "Jack"
Watkins, '15, Milton Shaw, '15 M, and
Paul H. Cooter, '14 L. The committee
will have full charge of the regular
Sunday afternoon gatherings and will
arrange to have some prominent
speaker present each week.

CENTER OUT OF
GAME FOR WEEK

Paterson's Ankle May Keep
From Both Syracuse and
Dak'ta Game.

him

X-RAY

SHOWS NOTHING

BAD.I

"Bubbles" Paterson, Michigan's hus-
ky center who was injured in the Ohio
State game Saturday, will probably be
kept out of active participation in the
gridiron sport for more than a week
at least. When the Michigan warriors
returned from Columbus Sunday even-
ing, Paterson was on crutches, and an
examination of his injured leg made
yesterday proved that it will be a num-
ber of days before his ankle will be
strong enough to use.-
When Paterson was taken out of the
battle Saturday which incidentally
was the first time in his football career
at Micigan that he has been obliged
to quit because of an injury, it was
thought that his hurt was nothing
more than a severely wrenched ankle.
Later it was thought that a bone might
have been broken or ligaments torn.
Yesterday Paterson submitted to an
x-ray examination and it developed
that his ankle was severely sprained in
the State game. While no bones are
broken and the ligaments are appar-
ently all right, the sprain is thought to
be serious enough to keep Paterson
out of the game until after the Syra-
cuse contest and possibly till the eye
of the South Dakota battle.
DISCIPLES OF T.R. BEET TONIGHT

WILL MAKE STUDY
OF TUBERCULOSIS
Governor Osborn Requests that Sun-
day be Devoted to Discussion
of White Plague.
DEAN VAUGHAN TO TALK HERE.
Next Sunday has been ordained by
Gov. Chase S. Osborn as Tuberculosis
Day throughout the state of Michigan.
It will be devoted to making public the
facts regarding the great white plague,
its prevalence, its symptoms, and its
remedies. Meetings will be held in
every town where there is a local
branch of the Michigan State society
for the Prevention of Tuberculosis,
and every effort put forth to enlist the
active cooperation of every citizen in
the endeavor to rid the state of the
dreaded disease.
In Ann Arbor the local society will
center its observance of the day on the
address by Dean Victor C. Vaughan to
be given at 4:00 o'clock in Sarah Cas-
well Angell Hall. Dr. Vaughan's sub-
ject will be "The Hygiene of Student.
Life," and he will speak particularly
of the influences in a college town con-
tributing to the spread of tuberculosis.
Students are sent home every year be-
cause of ill health resulting from ig-
norance or neglect of the rules of
health.
"One of the most pathetic cases of
which I have heard," said Dr. A. S.
Warthin yesterday, "occurred this fall
when a freshman law student was
sent home after he had passed his en-
trance examinations and had been
here only two weeks. Had he or his
parents been familiar with the symp-

SINGER WILL ARRIVE

TODAY.I

Prof. Stanley to )iseuss Program at
2:00 O'clock this Afternoon
at 1emorial Hall.
Madame Ernestine Schumann-Heinkl
will open the series of Choral Union
concerts this evening in University
Hall. Of all the many artists who,
have visited Ann Arbor she is without
doubt the favorite,.and no one more
welcome eon l have been chosen to
begin the season. Madame S tunanu-.
Heink will arrive early this morning
from Rochester, and will spend the
day at her hotel.
The program offered here is in many
ways exceptional, and includes some
of the singer's most famous arias and
songs. A discussion of the program
will be given by Prof. Stanley at 2:00
o'clock this afternoon in Memorial
hall, before his class in "Creative Lis-
tening." This lecture is public. Eduard
Collins, pianist, will contribute two
groups of soli to the program, and
Mrs. Katherine Hoffman will be the ac-
companist. Schumann-Heink's num-
bers follow:
a. Erda Scene (Rheingold) ..Wagner
b. Waltraute Scene (Cotterdammer-
ung)...................Wagner
c. Brangane's Ruf (Tristan & Isolde)
........ Wagner
d. Hirten-knabe Liedchen (Tann-
hauser) .................. Wagner
a. Traume .................. Wagner
b. Liebesbotschaft .......... Schubert
c. Die Junge Nonne ........ Schubert
d. Die Forelle............Schubert
e. Mondnacht.......Rob. Schumann
f. Spinnerliedchen .... . . .......
.............H. Reimann Collection
a. Mother 0' Mine .... Chas. F. Edson
b. When the Roses Bloom ......:;.
..................Louise Reichardt
c. Cry of Rachel.........Mary Salter
d. Kerry Dance ........J. L. Malloy
Deutscher Verein Meets Tonighlt.
The senior men's section of -the
Deuscher Verein will hold a short
meeting tomorrow night at 6:45 o'clock
to elect a secretary to fill the place left
vacant by E. Roth who failed to return
to college this fall. This is the first
meeting of the section and an attempt
at organization for the year will be
made.

NOTED ARTIST.
STARTS CHORAL
BE UNION SERIES
M1A AME ERN ESTIN E SCHUMANN-
IIE'NK To PRESENT FIRST NUM-
S OF YEAR iN UNiVERSITY
hALL TON IG lT.

SENIOR DENT AND SOPH MEDIC
AND HOMEOP CLASSES CAST
ALLOT WIIH NO SIGNS OF
ELECTIONEERING.
MANY ELECTIONS ON SATURDAY,
Underclassmen of Two Departments
Hold Meetings to Make
Nominations.
Elections were held yesterday in the
senior dent, soph medic and soph horn-
eop classes. None of the elections
were characterized by any excitement
and all were noticeably devoid of "pea-
nut politics."
Because of the failure to obtain a
majority of votes for vice-president at
the regular election, the senior laws
cast a special ballot yesterday after-
noon.. J. L. McDowell received a large
majority of votes over W. T. Be. Jun-
ior laws will hold a special election
for, president Thursday from 5:00 to
6:00 o'clock. The two candidates re-
ceiving the highest number of votes
at the regular election were E. W.
Haislet and R. M. Snyder. A special
election for senior lit president will
be held in Tappan hall Wednesday
from 3:00 to 5:30 o'clock. Selden
Dickenson and Harold B. Abbott are
the candidates.
All of the freshman classes and the
junior and soph lits will elect .next
Saturday morning. Following are yes-
terday's election results:
Soph medics: President; S. A. Steal-
ey; vice-president, Lucy Elliott; treas-
urer, Carl N. Larsen; secretary, Hett;
football manager, E. E. Koebbe; base-
ball manager, W. R. Vis; basketball
manager, Smith; track manager, N. A.
Myll; sargeant-at-arms, F. C. Mayne;
chairman of social committee, Lillie.
Senior dents: President, H. H. Me-
Umber; vice-president, J. Burlengame;
secretary, J. W. Snyder; treasurer, S.
L. Kingsbury; baseball manager, J. F.
Spencer; track manager, W. E. Sar-
gent; football manager, A. S. Chiches-
ter; basketball manager, C. W. Fargo,
Soph homeops: President, Town;
vice-president, Schepeler; secretary,
Hammel; treasurer, Glanzhorn; honor
committee, Conlon, Hildebrandt,Schep-
eler, Hammel and Town.
Recent nominations in the soph lit
class are as follows: President, Ches-
ter Lang, Percy Hammond, J. R. Wat-
kins, C. M. Anderson, Lyle Harris;
vice-president, Elizabeth Murphy and
Rebecca Ream; secretary, Marguerite
Foote, Alice Wiard, and Louise Mark-
ley; treasurer, K. Gould, George John-.
ston and A. Schrimps; baseball mana-
ger, John Parks, Paul Egar, W. Miller
and Charles Toles; track manager,
Paul Jenkins, John Bruce, and Harold
Wilson; basketball manager, Charles
Kendrick, E. onnely, F. W. Marble,
and Harold Kennedy; girls' basketball
manager, Helen Morse.
The fresh dents have nominated 4s
follows: President, Wood and Brown;
vice-president, Garrett, Mead, and
Lum; secretary, Schrader, MacVicar
and Strong; treasurer, Elliott, Fouda,
and Sherry; football manager, Dingler,
Standish, and M. E. Smith; baseball
manager, Garrison, Striffler, and Hub-
bard; basketball manager, Slanginski,
Melvin, and Feltin; track manager,
Robinson, McDonald, and Foster; sar-
geant-at-arms, Whltmeyer.
Another Petition for J. Lit Treasurer.
A petition has been circulated to
have the name of Bruce J. Miles plac-
ed on the Junior lit ballot as candidate
for class treasurer.

toms of tuberculosis he would not have
Will Hear Speeches by Members of come here; for, though he appeared in.
Law Faculty and Others. perfect health to the casual observer,
The call of the Bull Moose will be an examination showed him to be suf-
sounded tonight at the Progressive' fering from a severe case of tubercu-
club smoker which will be held at losis. We hope that a large number
7:30 o'clock at the progressive head-. of students, particularly first year men
quarters on Main street over the Walk- and women, will hear Dr. Vaughan and
over Shoe store. Professors Wilgus profit by his warning."
and Goddard will speak, as well as
Wm. H. Hill the Progressive candidate SOUTHERNERS MEET THIS
for congressman at large. All stu- AFTERNOON TO ORGANIZE.
dents who are interested are cordiallyi
welcome. There will be a meeting of all
southern men interested in the organi-
Well Known Forester Will Talk Here. zation of the new "Dixie Club" at the
Prof. Lovejoy, formerly supervisor Michigan Union this afternoon at 4:00
of the Olympic National forest, will 'o'clock. All men living south of the
give a talk before the Forestry club Mason and Dixon line are invited to
on October 23, 7:30 p. m., in room attend and assist in the effort to launch
407 new engineering building. All what promises to add another one to
freshmen should take this opportunity the list of sectional organizations.
to hear a live talk on forestry. A bus- It is planned to hold -a smoker in
iness meeting of theclub will be held the near future and temporary com-
te 7:00 o'clock. mittees will be appointed.

* Phtogrpher nowread

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