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June 06, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-06-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

..
;..

E WEATHER MAN

The

cast For Ann Arbor:

Mga

Daily

ONLY MORNING PAPER > 1

ANN ARBOR

Fair and warmer.

II, No. 179.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CET

BIG SUMMER
ENROLLMENT
IS EXPECTED
Work in Law Department Commences
on J une 23, Other Departments
on June 30; All Close by
August 30.
SEVERAL LEAINA E1)UCATORS
ARE ENGAGED FOR SESSION.
Forty Special Lectures by Members
of Faculty Have Been3
Arranged.

CHAIRS FOR UNION ARRIVE.
Hore than Twenty New Names Added
to List of Donors.
The first consignment of chairs for
the new Union addition which are be-
ing contributed by the members, was
received yesterday by Mack and Co.,
and will be placed in the Union as soon
as they can be unpacked and the plat-
es with the donors names attached.
Since last published about two doz-
en new names have been added to the
list, quite a number of whom subscrib-
ed at the membership dinner last
night. The plan is this; any mem-
ber by donating $2.00 purchases a
chair, the balance of the price being
made up by the Union. A metal plate
is then placed on each chair with the
name and class of the donor. The
subscrip'tion list may be found at the
Union desk any time for those who de-

LITS FAVOR PHASE
OF HONOR SYSTEM
Classes Will Not Approve Reporting
of Students Seen Cheating,
in Exams.

CAPT. AMUNOSEN
SPEAKS TONIGHT
Noted Antarctic Explorer Appears in
University hall Under Auspices
of V. . C. A.

FACULTY MEN EXPRESS OPINIONS I WILL BE GUEST OF PROF. HOBBS.

Champions of the honor system won

Capt. Roald Amundsen, recent ex-

out in two lit classes yesterday after- plorer of the Antarctic regions will de-
noon when the freshmen and juniors liver a lecture illustrated by motion

passed resolutions stating that they
were in favor of the principle of a lib-
eral honor system. This is the pro-
gram which the adherents of the plan
have adopted, since it was seen that
nothing could be done toward secur-
ing the adoption of a complete and de-
tailed plan of taking examinations un-

Indications point to the largest sum- sire to sign it.

mer session in the history of the Uni-
versity of Michigan. So far.more than
1,200 inquiries have been received in
regard to the session, besides 35 for
the embalmers course and 30 for the
biological station. This is an increase
'of. 300-over last year and the officials

UNION DINERS
HEAR ADDRESS
DY DR. ANGELL

expect an enrollment of more than
1,500 as compared with 1,384 in 1912.
Work in the law department will
commence on June 23 and will close
on August 30 while the lectures in the
other departments will begin on June
30 and continue until August 22 with
the exception of the medical depart-
ment which will complete its schedule
August 8.
Three new subjects will be added to
the curriculum of the hot weather ses-
sion. Courses in landscape designing
and architecture will be given for the
first time in the summer in the engi-
neering department and an embalming
course will. be presented under the su-
pervision of the pharmacy and chem-
istry departments.
A number 'of professors from lead-
ing universities in the country will
teach in the session. Prof. F. A. Up-
dike, of Dartmouth, will have charge
of the courses in political sci-
ence. Prof. M. Parmelee, of
the Univerity of Missouri, will conduct
courses in the sociology department
and -Prof. Frank Carney, of Dennison
University, will give courses in geolo-
gy, and will have charge of the cus-
tomary excursion to Put-in-Bay and
Niagara Falls along with Prof. Hobbs.
A series of 40 special lectures have
been arranged for the students who
attend the session and will be given
by members of the university faculty.
It is also planned to have Gov. W. N.
Ferris, State Geologist R. C. Allen and
Regent L. L. Hubbard give addresses.
Negotiations have been made to get
the hep, Greet Woodland Players to
give three open air performances some
time in July or August.
In order to furnish the summer stu-
dents with the news of the session
The Wolverine will be issued again.
It was established in the summer of
1910 and has enjoyed such a substatntial
growth that it has come to be looked
upon as a permanent fixture of the hot
weather session. It will be issued tri-
weekly and will also print a directory
of the students.
Wolverine Business Manager Resigns.
Malcolm McCormick, '15, who was
recently appointed business manager of
the Wolverine for the 1913 summer
session has resigned his position on
account of ill health. He will not re-
turn to school next fall, but will trav-
el in the west and south. The vacancy
caused by McCormick's resignation
will'be filled Saturday morning by the
board-in control of publications.
ARRANGEMENTS FOR SUMNER
BASEBALL ARE COMPLETED.

President-Emeritus Delivers Farewell
Talk to Seniors Who Attend
Final Membership
Gathering.
PROF. H. C. ADAMS EXPRESSES
ATTITUDE OF FACULTY MEN.
New and Retiring Officers Give Short
Talks on Various
Topics.
Repeated outbreaks of the smallpox
epidemic have prompted the commit-
tee on university sanitation to arrange
for the free vaccination of all men and
women connected in any way with the
university Friday, Saturday, and Mon-
day, June 6, 7, and 9, in Waterman
and Barbour gymnasiums from 9:00
to 10:00 o'clock.
Numerous instances of the disease
have occurred directly after the vic-
tims had been warned to submit to an
innoculation of the vaccine, and con-
siderable discussion has been aroused
as to the feasibility of compulsory vac
cination.
President Hutchins has issued a no-
tice which will be posted on the cam-
pus bulletin boards tomorrow, in which
he declares: "While there is no occasion
for alarm, or for uneasiness even,there
is occasion for the highest degree of
care and precaution and for prompt
cooperation with the authorities in
their efforts to stamp out the disease.
The condition is such as to justify the
conclusion that cases of the disease
will undoubtedly follow. Vaccination
has been made compulsory in cases of
known exposure and it is earnestly
urged that the advice of the commit-
tee on sanitation be followed at once.
Dean Bates speaking on the legal
phase of the matter, said: "I don't be-
lieve the university can force the stu-
Jents to submit to vaccination, but it
can prohibit them from attending class-
es if they are not vaccinated. The
question of legality, then, can easily
be overruled."
Dean Vaughan stated: "Its up to the
Individual to protect himself from the
danger of smallpox when he is given
the opportunity, and society cannot
protect him more than he will allow.
There is no doubt that vaccination 'will
eliminate or t least check the dis-
ease, but co ulsory vaccination is
impractical ex pt in exceptional in-,
stances."
PROF. WENLEY WILL ADDRESS
OKLAHOMA GRADUATING CLASS,
Prof. R M. Wenley will leave for
Oklahoma on Sunday where he will de-,
liver the commencement address at
the University of Oklahoma, and also
address the Michigan alumni at Kan-
sas City and Oklahoma City. All ar-
rangements have been made for con-
lucting his examinations, both under-
graduate and graduate. He will re-
turn to Ann Arbor about June 15, and
will arrange to see students at his
home for consultation thereafter.
those interested in the game come sup-
plied next fall with all the necessary
paraphernalia.

der student control.
Under this scheme, which the senior
lits have also adopted, an attempt will
be made by individual members of the
several classes in the lit department
to have final exams in the rhetoric,
philosophy and economics departments
taken under the honor system. They
will take up the matter with the sever-
al professors and instructors, with the
idea of having it brought before the
class for action
Faculty men in these departments,
who have been interviewed, state that,
while they have no objections to the
honor system, they do not approve of
the means proposed to inaugurate it.
Prof. T. E. Rankin, of the rhetoric de-
partment, said last night that such a
method would be too premature, and
that discussion could not be allowed
either in the regular meetings of his
classes or at the time of the final ex-
aminations, because of the time that
would be taken up. Prof. Lloyd, of the
philosophy department, was of the
same opinion. Prof. F. M. Taylor of
the economics faculty indicated that
he would not consider the subject.
Selden Dickinson, president of the
senior lits, addressed the juniors at
their class meeting yesterday after-n
noon in the west physics lecture room,
and explained the purpose of the reso-
lution which was proposed for adop-t
tion. Karl Mohr, also of the seniors,
undertook the same task with the
freshmen. The plan will also be1
brought before the sophomore lits thisP
afternoon in Tappan hail at 4:00
o'clock.
ADD $100 TO SENIOR LAW
CLASS MEMORIAL LOAN FUND l
An addition of $100 was yesterday b
made to the Memorial Loan fund which ;
is the senior law class gift to the le- N
gal department. This makes a sum
of $300 which will be deposited with N
the university treasurr and will be h
under the care of the president of the
university and dean of the law depart-
ment who will loan it out to any needy S
law student for assistance in his col- u
lege course. c

pictures and stereoptican views in uni-
versity Hall tonight at 8:15 o'clock.
His lecture will be based on his trip
to the South Pole and the hardships
endured from hunger, cold and lack of
comfort.
The lecture tour which Capt, Amund-
sen is now making is to raise funds
with which to make a trip to the
North Pole. A. lecture similar to the
one to be given tonight was delivered
in Detroit several months ago. Pres-
ident H. B. Hutchins presided at the
affair and it was well attended by Uni-
versity faculty members and students.
The captain comes here tonight under
the auspices of the University Y. M. C.
A.
While in Ann Arbor the noted ex-
plorer will be entertained by his per-
sonal friend, Professor William H.
Hobbs of the Geology department.
UNION COMMITTEE ON PLANS
IS APPOiNVTED FOR NEXT YEAR
Committee Members to Return Early
Next Fal to Assist Freshmen in
Finding Rooms.
A committee of 29 students has been
appointed to take charge of the early
work in connection with the Michigan
Union next October. A majority of the
men appointed have volunteered to re-
turn one week before the opening of
school in order to aid in the work of
helping freshmen secure rooms and in
assisting them in becoming familiar
with the ways of Ann Arbor. The
committee will also open the employ-
ment bureau and do everything in their
power toward helping students secure
jobs. The committee is composed of
the following members:
William C. Allard, '14; Wayne I. At-
water, '14; George Ballantine, '14E;
W. F. Black, '13, William Campbell,'16;
Ned Crane, '15; Cyril Donnelly, '15L;
Ed Field, '15; Edward Haislip, '14L;
F. H. Hossick, '15; Carl Jenks, '15;
Everett Judson, '16E; Patrick Koontz,
14; Howard Marsh, '15; Daniel Mc-
Laughlin, '15; Leland Mecham, '15L;
Harry Parker, '15; Howard Pelham,
16; Carl Pfeifer, '14E; Theodore Ro-
bie, '14E; Julius Schlotthauer, '14; J.
R. Thomas, '15L; John Thomas, '14;
W. J. Thienes, '14E; Eugene Wells,
15L; J. C. Wernicke, '14; Kenneth
Westerman, '14; Robert White, '14;
Edmund Wood, '16.
The attendance committee will meet
Saturday morning June 7, from 9:00
until 10:30 o'clock. Excessive absen-
ces must be excused at this time.

x
a

MEAN GREENE GIVES ADDRESS
Touches on Relationship Betweet
America and Japan.
"A glimpse at the papers of thi
country during the past few weeks i
a proof that it is time western nation
learned something about the Orient,'
said Dean Greene, of the University
of Illinois literary department, in a
talk before Prof. Van Tyne's class ir
American history yesterday afternoon.
"Our relations with Japan have beer
most cordial in the past and will prob-
ably remain so."
Prof. Greene spoke on "The Pres-
ent Tarnsition in Japan." He de-
clared that American colleges should
teach more of the Orient as it would
help trade in the east and also give
western civilization a benefit similar
to that derived- by the Oriental stu-
dents in western educational institu-
tions.
ADVOCATE TO
BE CHAIRMAN
Board in Control of Athletics Will
Probably Pick Favorable Man
At Meeting to Be
Held Soon.
PROF. AIGLER IS FREQUENTLY
MENTIONED AS LIKELY CHOICE
Student Members Want Representative
on Executive Committee
of Board.
The board in control of athletics will

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.
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INVESTIGATION
OF i-HO'P R IOT
Is COMPLETEI
Student Council Examines More Thai
200 Men For Misconduct
at Recent Affair
in Gyms.
NONE OF STUDENTS ASKED
TO WITHDRAW FROM COLLEGE
Twelve Men i! Ali Are Reprimanded
Three of Whom Get Special
Punishment.

The final report o' the student coun-
cil relative to the J-Hop riot investi-
gation has been completed. The coun-
cil examined over 200 men and al-
though several were punished, none
of the offenders were asked to leave
school. The report is only statistical,
no names being given for publication.
The official report, as submitted by
officers of the council is as follows:
"The student council announces that
it took up the question of the disturb-
ance at the J-Hop in, February of this

URGE STUDENTS TO BE VACCINATED

probably meet next week, and
at that time, besides the ef-
fort of the pro-conference men
to elect a new - chairman who will
be favorable to their policies, the stu-
dent members will attempt to have one
of their number named on the execu-
tive comimttee.
As the board is composed of four
professors, three. alumni, three stu-
dents, and the athletic director, the
student members believe they are en-
titled to a member on this committee,
and will make a determined stand on
this point. As they -are all pro-con-
ference men, and the board stands 8
to 3 on the conference question, with
the favorable faction in the majority,
the student members anticipate no
difficulty in bringing this about.
Prof. Patterson, acting chairman,
has promised to call a meeting of the
board next week, if such a move is
possible. The three alumni members
reside in Chicago, Detroit, and Bay
City, so that it requires some little
time to arrange a meeting. Director
P. G. Bartelme and Prof. Whitney are
also out of the city, and it may be im-
possible to get a quorum at this par-
ticular time. The reason for the new
members desiring a meeting before
the university closes was in order that
resolutions might be adopted for sub-
mission to the June conference meet-
ing; but this will now be impossible.
However, there are several other mat-
ters which will come before the board
at this time.
A member of the board, who did not
care to be quoted directly, stated last
night that the effort by the pro-con-
ference men to name a chairman from
their number would certainly be made,
whether the board met next week or
next fall. Prof. Aigler, of the law de-
partment, is the man most frequently
spoken of by the board members for
this position.
Senior Women Hold Breakfast June 20
Senior women will gather for the
final "get to gether" at their breakfast
at the Union June 20 from 8:30 o'clock,
until 11:00 o'clock. Dean Myra B.
Jordan and Miss Catherine Bigelow
will act as chape'rones. Two original
playlets will be presented after the
breakfast, which will be replete with
hits on the women in the class. The
list of toasts has not been arranged.
Oscar Beckman, '12, is making a
week end visit to the university. He
was a former member.of The.Michigan.
Daily staff, of Druids, and the Delta
Tau Delta fraternity. He is now with
the City News Bureau of Chicago.

year.
"Over 200 men were examined for
misconduct there; the names of 16 of
these were submitted by the faculty
while the other names were acquired
by the council from other sources.
"The investigations into the actions
of all these men was pursued by the
council in a great many full meetings
and by committees and sub-commit-
tees. After full discussion of every
case, late in May the council voted the
following punishments, and to date
there has been no appeal to the facul-
ty: Thirteen of the men whose names
were submitted by the faculty were ex-
onerated, no one was advised to with-
draw from the university, and 'three
were punished. Of those examined on
charges presented from sources other
than the faculty, nine were punished.
"Of the 12 punished by the student
council one was advised or directed to
withdraw from all class and non-aca-
demic activities for a year; two were
put on probation or suspended judg-
ment with the provision that there
should be absolutely no misconduct
for a year, and nine were reprimand-
ed or censured before the council or
by its officers.
One councilman was accused of par-
ticipating in the disturbance, but close
examination showed him clearly not
guilty and accordingly the council ex-
onerated him.
- "The council's investigation did not
disclose the men who were on the ram
that broke down the door of Waterman
gymnasium.
"The council desires to express its
appreciation for the assistance ren-
dered it by the student body in this
investigation and is confident that in
future years it will receive even great-
er co-operation."
UNION PLANS FOR PROGRAM
OF SUMMER SOCIAL EVENTS.
Summer activities of the Union will
be in the hands of a committee which
President-elect Selden S. Dickinson,
'13-'15L, is to announce very shortly.
The committee's work will 'consist
mainly of social duties. They will take
charge of the dances which will be
held once a week, either on Friday or
Saturday nights. Any lawn fetes - or
other events of a social nature will
also be arranged for by the committee.
With more than a thousand summer .
school students, whose work comes
mainly during the day, there is plenty
of time for the social side and the Un-
ion plans to take the lead in providing
entertainment.
Tickets For Union Dance Now on Sale
Tickets for the Union membership
dance on Saturday night are now on
sale, at the desk in the Union. The
rules governing the dances will be
strictly enforced and such kinds of
dancing as are on the ban will not be
allowed. The so-called hesitation
waltz which so often interferes with
the other dancers will receive partic-
ular attention.Dr.and Mrs.Frederick R.
Waldron and Prof. and Mrs. Otto C.
Glaser, will chaerone.

Addressing his remarks particularly
to the 50 cap and gowned seniors at
the Union dinner last night, President
Emeritus James B. Angell said, in
speaking on what the future had in
store for the prospective graduates,
"one of the greatest secrets of success
in life lies in the ability to differ with
one's neighbors without losing one's
temper; to be big hearted and gener-
ous in one's estimation of others."
Professor Henry C. Adams, of the
economics department, said in speak-
ing on the attitude of the faculty, "the
Union is well worth the efforts that are
expended to keep it going; through the

influence of the Union, a university
spirit is being created that it would be
otherwise impossible to conceive of."
Edward Kemp, '14L, reviewed in a
general way the work that has been
accomplished during the year just clos-
ing. In his inaugural speech, Selden
Dickinson, '13-'15L, the newly elected
president of the Union, outlined in a
broad way the policy of the incoming
administration.
Karl J. Mohr, '13, was master of
ceremonies for the evening, Maurice
Toulme, '14L, and George Burgess,
'13L, talked on different phases of the
Union organization. 165 men attended
the dinner.

gements have been completed
campus summer baseball
which comprises teams from
ary, law, engineering and med-
>artments. A schedule of 18
ias been arranged and a con-
i drawn up to be submitted at
meeting of the players.
e to Receive 'trial Next Fall,
sse enthusiasts gathered at
an gymnasium, last Tuesday to
is for the inauguration of the
Michigan. It was decided to
sport a trial between halves
ootball games next fall. The

N EXT YE A R
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The Official MICHIGAN Recorder is the MICHIGAN DAILY

SENIORS
Do It Now!

You can get the news daily during the
college year 1913-14 for $3.00.
Offices across from Majestic. - -3 P. M. daily.
MAILED TO ANY ADDRESS

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