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June 05, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER MAN
orecast For Ann Arbor:
Thursday andl Friday-Fair.

T 1Th3a

Daily

ONLY MORNING PAPER I

ANN ARBOR

-

Vol. XXIII, No. 178.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TI URSDAY, JUNE 5, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

- U

OLD BOYS' TO
CROSS BATS
WITH VARSITY

Stars of Former Days Will Return
Attempt to Wrest Laurels
From Heads of Present
Team.,

and

MAY SEND SISLER IN FOR
BENEFIT OF OLD PERFORMERS.

Lineup of

Varsity to be Nearly
As in Former
Games.

SameI

The "Old Boys" who were once wont
to disport on the diamond and clot the
pill are going to attempt to do what
one Jim Jeffries found impossible,
namely, to come back. After weeks of
strenuous practice on the sand lots of
Detroit and elsewhere, and after weeks
of sore arms and cramped limbs, the
once wasers announced their readi-
ness to settle arguments with the dia-
mond stars of today.
It is indeed a rather imposing ar-
ray of talent that will uphold the tra-
ditions of the has beens in the fray.
Plans have been in progress for some
time and it is believed that all the
stars who are counted on will be on
the field, and the regulars will have
a hard job in landing the long end of
the score.
Utley, a former captain and coach
here, will do the twirling, and his arm
is reported to b-e in old time form. En-
zenroth, the 1910 captain, will do the
backstopping, with a third ex-captain
Hill on the Initial sack. The second
base job has been allotted to Hays and
the third station to Lathers. Marlin
or Campbell will cover the short stop
territory. The makeup of the outfield
will be picked from a long list of stars
including Snow, Mitchell, O'Brian,
Merimay, Wendell and a host of others.
The lineup of the Varsity will be the
regular men with the slabsmen to be
decided later by Captain Bell. Sisler
may be sent in a few in-
nings to let the old gradssee
the phenom in action again and to
try and solve the curves that so com-
pletely baffled them in the contest last
year when the left hander defeated
them by a3 to 1score, allowing only
four hits and whiffing 15 of their bats-
men.
SENIOR LITS ELECT KARL
MOHIR ALUMNI SECRETARY.
Karl Mohr was electd alumnitsecre-
tary of the senior lits at a meeting of
the class yesterday. Edwin Thurston,
and Elaine Shields were also chosen
on the alumni committee.
The surplus of $200 caused by non
use of the money which the class vot-
ed for the senior reception, was left to
the finance committee to use at its dis-
cretion.
The last chance for senior lits to ob-
tain invitations was announced as this
afternoon at the S. L. A. window from
3:00 to 5:00 o'clock.'

WOMEN WILL MEET SATURDAY.
Will Appoint Committee to Draft Self-
Government Rules.
Irene Bigalke, '14, League president
for next year, will take charge of the
final meeting of the Women's League
Saturday morning at 9:00 o'clock at
Barbour gym. Routine business will
be transacted. The question of the
new self-government committee will
not receive any definite attention al-
though it is expected that a commit-
tee to draft rules will be appointed.
The plans of the committee are very
vague. The main idea is to work for
a scheme similar to that in force at
Wisconsin, where the women are prac-
tically self-governing in all non-aca-
demic activities. There is to be no
affiliation with the men's student coun-
cil, both bodies to act separately upon
affairs relative to their own interests.
As to how extensive the powers of the
women's council will be, there are no
definite statements to be made. It is
even doubted at present whether the
council will'be in force at the opening
of school in the fall as had been hoped
for.
SHOW INTEREST
I MILITARY CAMP
Many Inquiries Being Made Regarding'
Training to Be Given Students
During Summer.
NO LIMIT TO NUMBER TAKEN.
That interest is already manifest-
ing itself concerning the military campI
which is to be maintained this summer
for college men as practical trainingI
for them is shown by the inquiriesI
which hav.e already been made of Prof.r
Gram, who has been appointed by
President Hutchins to take charge oft
the applications.The camp about which
so many inquiries have been made andt
which will probably be of most inter-y
est to Michigan men will be located at
the Gettysburg National Park in Penn-1
sylvania from July 7 to August 15 in-
clusive. The California camp is too
far away to get many men from Ann
Arbor.f
"Applications will probably comeF
in slowly," said Prof. Gram "as mostt
of the boys have probably not decidedv
as yet how they are going to spend i
their vacation. However coming as it
does on the heels of the withdrawal ofc
the government's offer of a naval train-h
ing this summer, I think the plan will
meet with the favor of a good number."h
No limit was set as to the number
of men that could be taken fromd
"jjghigan, and all those applying who i
receive the recommendation of being t
physically fit will be accepted. It will
be provided as far as practical that all
men from the same college shall be
together and occupy the same or ad-
joining tents if they so desire. Appli-
cations may be handed in to Prof.
Gram at room 322 New engineering
building. h

of

Senior lits, for the second time this
year, went on record yesterday as dis-
tinctly in favor of the principle of the
honor system in examinations, but
made no definite provision whereby
the plan might be put in use in their
final examination this year. It was
left to each member of the class to
take the matter up with his instruct-
ors, if he chose, and to attempt to have
it settled in each of his classes sepa-
rately.
Karl Mohr, reporting for the com-
mittee on the honor system, proposed
that such a procedure be followed,
and claimed that the fact that the
class wet on record with a resolution
in favor of the system would have
much influence in boosting the scheme
on the campus next year.
Junior lits will wrestle with the
problem today at 4:15 o'clock in the
west physics lecture room. The ques-
tion of whether the plan should be fol-
lowed in the finals this year or not, is
expected to come up.
COMEDY CLUB CHOOSES IEW
MEMBERS FOR NEXT YEAR
Comedy club held their final tryoutst
yesterday afternoon and selected the
following new members: Mildred
Nuechterlein '15, Elsie Seitz '14,1Helen
G. Brandebury '14, Ruth Greybill '6,
Phyllis Polva '16, 0. B. Winters '14,
Bernus E. Kline "14, Louis K. Fried-
man '15.
The competition was exceptionally
close and only eight were chosen from
the 49 contestants. Another oppor-
tunity for tryouts will be given next.
year some time in October. ;
ELECTION OF CHEIERLEA DERS
TO BE POSTPONED TILL FALL.
The election of Varsity cheerleaders<
for the ensuing year will not takel
place until next semester, after about
two football games, when more tryouts
will be held. It was thought by thoseI
in charge, that the tryouts held recent-
ly were not fair nor that they un-,
earthed enough material to warrant
holding an election this spring. I
However, another tryout will be c
held Saturday at the Varsity-Alumni1
game, when the names of the candi-
dates will be printed in the program,
n order to familiarize the crowds with
he embryo cheerleaders. 1
LURE OF CITY DEPRIVES
GAMPUS OF COBBLER-POET
Michigan draws her students from the
our corners of the globe, and theirc
reasons for coming to Ann Arbor areI
varied. It is doubtful, however, if any
came for the same reason that one of
our professors took up his profession;
who, in a public confession, before
one of his classes yesterday admittedc
that his reason for becoming a peda- t
gogue was because he hadn't the qual-
ifications of a successful farmer. C
Prof. U. B. Phillips, of the history 1
lepartment, was born in the uplandst
of Georgia. His ambition was alwayst
to become a southern planter, but un-I
ortunately he discovered that such a I
position necessitated rising at an early f
hour. He therefore gave up the call-i
ng of his choice, and became a teach-c
er.; He insists, however, that none ofe
is classes be scheduled at an earlyn
Lour, and his only morning class meetsN
it 11:00 o'clock.l

Senior Lits 1eeide to Leave Matter
MIember.

J LITS

TO DISCUSS

QUESI",'''C.N.

FAVOR' PHIIdG, E
OC HuoR SYSTLM

FAMOUS TRAINER
IS IN PHILA.
Farrell Eulogizes Dean of Trainers
Who Piloted 11 Intercollegiate
Champions.
WA S COACH OF OLYMPIC TEAM.
Death yesterday closed the remarka-
ble career of "Mike" Murphy, famous
trainer of University of Pennsylvania
athletic teams. Only last Saturday,
the sons of Penn, realizing their train
er was on his dying bed, strove to pay
him a final tribute, a heart felt appre-
eiation of old "Mike," by capturing the
Intercollegiate track championship of
America.
Dr. G. A. May, in speaking of the
old veteran said, "He had a most at-
tractive personality. His natural abil-
ity to spot a promising athlete, was re-
markable. Mike Murphy could get
more out of his men than any coach in
the country. His death is a tragic loss
to amateur athletics."
"Steve" Farrell said, "The dean of
trainers, Mike Murphy's record is a
most enviable one. His personality
and ability has won for him a univer-
sal recognition."
Dr. A. C. Kraenzlein, coach of Mich-
igan athletics last year, is a product
of the Murphy school of athletes. Un-
der Murphy's tutorship Kraenzlein was
enabled to hang up four collegiate and
two world's records which stand to-
day. Murphy trained the Yale track
teams 'before going to Pennsylvania
and not until "Mike" took the reins did
the sons of Eli have a championship
team. During his four year's stay at
Yale, the men in. Blue won as many
Intercollegiate track championships:
Under his supervision, the Red and
Blue athletes have acquired a wonder-
ful record, having won the Intercol-
legiate championships in track seven
times.
Murphy also trained the American
olympic teams that won premier hon-
ors from the athletes of the world at1
London in 1908. His career started as
coach of the Detroit Athletic club in1
1891. From that'time to his death his
achievements have brought forth the
praise and admiration of the entire,
athletic world.
Compile Booklet Describing Ann Arbor
A booklet containing articles and il-
lustrations describing Ann Arbor as an
ideal university city is being compileda
by Prof. J. R. Nelson and W. B. Shaw,
of the Michigan Alumnus, for the Civic t
Improvement association. The edition t
will contain 24 pages of reading mate-
rial, and will be printed in four colors.
More than 10,000 copies will be distrib-
uted.
CALL OF COUCH SETTLES
CAREER OF HISTORY PROF
All is darkness around"Tom's" placet
on State street, for the "doctor" i
has gone to Detroit. Summer school I
stuents will be deprived of the oratory
and poetry of Michigan's self-made or-r
ator and Ann Arbor's cobbler poet, for
Tom Lovell has been forced by finan-i
cial straits to seek new patronage in
the City of the Straits.t
For some time Tom has contemplat-e
ed this iove, but the love for Ann Ar-i
bor and her "byes," together with an 4
appreciation of his debt of gratitude to
dhem, has always' been too strong to l
permit the severance of ties which

have been formed by the closest
friendship. Last -spring Tom moved
up closer to the campus, but his finan-
cial condition has threatened to be- .
come worse, and the decreased patron-4
age has led him to seek business else- 4
where. He will return in the fall, he
hopes

MEET CLOSES PLAYGROUND WORK
Ask Students to Officiate at Public
School Competition.
Student playground work for the
year will end next Saturday afternoon
with a track meet at the fair grounds
commencing at 2:00 o'clock. Boys
from all six of the Ann Arbor public
schools will compete and the 'school
winning the greatest number of points
will receive a shield. The contestants
have been divided into three classes
according to their weights and there
will be seven events, including -a ten
lap relay race in each class. No one
will be allowed to compete in more
than three events.
The playground committee asks for
as many men as can turn out, to act
as scorers, timers, and other officials.
0. S. U. Football Star to Join Michigan
Football fans who saw the Michigan-
0. S. U. game in 1911 will be interested
in learning that Foss, the quarterback
Who played such a brilliant game for
Ohio State will come to Michigan next
year to take law. Having only played
two years at Columbus, he will be el-
igible to play.
SAYSTH ERE ARE

UNION DINNER
TO BE OPEN TO
ALL STUDENTS
President-Elect Dickinson and Prof.
Henry C. Adams Will Outline
Activities for the
Coming Year.
DR. JAMES B. ANGELL TO DELIVER
]FARE WELL SPEECH TO SENIORS.
.Mimes to Give Skit in Inauguration
Ceremonies for Newly Chosen
Officers.
All students whether Union members
or not are invited to attend the final
membership dinner tonight at '6:00
o'clock. Dr. James B. Angell will de-
liver the farewell address to the sen-
iors who are leaving. Inaugural
speeches will be made by the new offi-
cers. Prof. William Howland of the
School of Music will sing solos and
the Mimes will produce a short skit.
The program has been arranged with
the end in view of presenting the poli-
cies of the Union for next year so that
non-members who attend may be ac-
quainted with the activities to be un-
dertaken and the inducements that will
be offered to members. Prof. Henry
C. Adams, one of the faculty repre-
sentatives on the board, and president-
elect Selden S. Dickinson, '13-'15L, will
both make their talks oft this nature.
Retiring president Edward G. Kemp,
'14L, will review briefly the work of
the past year. Maurice Toulme, '14L,
and George Burgess, '13L, vice-presi-
dent-elect, and retiring vice-president
respectively from the law department
are on the program for short talks.
Karl J. Mohr, '13, who has served as
chairman of the dinner committee dur-
ing the year will preside as toastmas-
ter.

PLENTY OFJOBS
Prof. Davis Declares Appointment
Committee Will Find Positions -
For All Teachers.
OPENINGS FOUND IN SUMMER.
There will be no let up in the work
of the appointment committee during
the summer months and seniors who
have not yet been placed in teaching
positions will have many opportunities
during vacation and the early fall,'ac-
cording to , Prof. Davis, of the edu-
cation department.
With a large class of seniors the
committee has had a busy period this
spring, and while many have already
been provided for in lucrative positions
those still without situations will be
taken care of by the committee in the
near future.
"Many good jobs are opened up for
various reasons during the summer
and fall," declared Prof. Davis yester-
day, "and there is no cause for any
senior desiring a teaching position to
become discouraged. We always man-
age to find a place for everybody soon-
er or later."
A list has been posted -on the bulle-
tin board in Tappan hail containing
the names of those who are to be rec-
ommended for the teacher's diploma
and Professor Davis is urging all can-
didates for the "shingle" to make sure
their names are on the list and to re-
port to him any omissions. The list
will be closed this week.
Europe Attracts Music Faculty.
Several members of the University
School of Music faculty are to spend
the summer in Europe. Prof. Albert
A. Stanley will travel in Germany and
England. Prof. Albert Lockwood, will
spend several weeks in northern Eu-
rope, while Earl V. Moore, of the organ
department, only recently left for Par-
is where he will spend the summer
and fall. Miss Ada Grace Johnson of
the vocal department, has been grant-
ed a year's leave of absence that she
may go to Paris to study under Jean
de Reszke.
Fresh Tennis Team to Play Ypsiites.
Net artists from the State Normal
will play a match with the freshman
tennis team on the varsity courts at
3:00 p. m. today. As the Normal team
has succeded in defeating M. A. C. and
other strong teams, this game is deem-
ed an important one. However, the.
freshmen won from the Ypsilantiites
last Saturday and should repeattoday.

i
r
1
l
'2
3
t
i
f

ALUMNI WILL DINE AT THE
, UNION COMMENCEMENT WEEK

As far as could be learned the tick-
ets were having a ready sale in the
hands of the comimtteemen yesterday
and a record breaking attendance is
looked for. Seniors are requested to
wear their 4caps and gowns.
STUDENTS ARE PLACED BY
APPOINTMEN~T CO1EMITTEE.
During the past two weeks the follow-
ing students have been placed in teach-
ing positions for next year through
the efforts of the teachers' appoint-
ment committee of the university:Geo.
B. Crawford, West Branch, superinten-
dent; James B. Mott, Midland, princi-
pal; Mabel Bradley, Sweetwater col-
lege, Sweetwater, Tenn., German and
botany; Marjorie Baldwin, Corunna,
Latin and German; Ethel Ehrhorn,
L'Ause, German; Christine Foster,
Blissfield, Latin and German; Mary
Kerr, eighth grade and mathematics,
Howard City; Mildred Kolb, Mt. Pleas-
ant, German; Annie Wiggins, Flint
county normal; Jean McCredie, Albion,
English; John H. Muyskeps, Sauga-
tuck; Irene Murphy, Albion, German;
Edward Cole, principal ward school,
Jackson; Olive Benbrook, Lake Lin-
den, English; Eugene La Rowe, May-
ville, Ill., J. L. La Rue, Ithaca, super-
intendent; Lucy Bonino, St. Ignace,
Latin and German; Ruby Severence,
Coldwater,.mathematics;Norine Leary,
Ontonagon, Latin and German; Clyde
Carver, Detroit, Dexter school; Henri.
etta Inglas, Iron Mountain, mathemat-
ics; Rachael Markham, Iron Mountain,
history.
Gargoyle Staff Holds Banquet.
Twenty members of the Gargoyle
staff attended the annual banquet at
the Union last night. Harold McGee
acted as toastmaster. Talks were giv-
en by Professors F. N. Scott, W. G.
Stoner, and J. R. Brumm; and Karl
Matthews, '13L, and Walter Staebler,
'13,
Web and Flange Initiates NineJuniors.
Web and Flange, the senior civil en-
gineering society, held its annual
spring initiation last night, taking in
the fololwing new men: Prof. H. E.
Riggs, T. G. Abrams, H. J. Bill, S. B.
Douglas, F. W. Dubois, R. A. Hill, E. P.
McQueen, B. H. Reeves, and A. Roth.
"Nig Kuhn acted as toastmaster at
the banquet held at Mack's tea room

tICKEY'S SUCCESSOR NOT TO
BE CHOSEN UNTIL NEXT YEAR
Branch Rickey's succssor as coach
f the varsity baseball team has not
et been selected, and probably will
ot be until fall, or possibly winter.
'hesupply of capable candidates is al-
host unlimited in this branch of sport,
nd the athletic authorities will not
iake a hasty selection.
Last year when it was announced
aat Rickey would discontinue his 'e-
ations with the -university a literal
ood of applications for the position
oured in at the athletic office.
OTED COMEDIAN TO FEATURE
CATHOLIC GATHERING TONIGHT
The last social gathering of the year
> be given by the Catholic students'
lub is a luncheon and smoker in St.
'homas hall tonight. Frank McIntyre,
he noted comedian, will feature the
rogram by giving selections from his
itest stage success, "0 O'Delphine."
'alks will be made by Mayor McKen-
e Trainer "Steve" Farrell, Prose-
unto aeorg eBurk end City Attorney

Preparations are being made by the
Union to take care of the large number
of alumni who will be here during
commencement week. Last year, prac-
tically every class dinner that was
held was given at the Unio'n. Nine
classes have already made arrange-
ments for dinners this year, and many
more engagements will no doubt be
made before the festivities start. The
large room will be divided into sec-
tions, and the regular dining rooms are
also to be used.
Thirty or forty students will be
needed to provide extra help and all
who desire to work should leave their
names with the steward at once.

/Ai Associal Senior Rate!

Membership, including Subscription to THE MICHIGAN ALUMNUS

0

$3.00 for three years or $1.00 for one year.

(Regular Alumni Rate, $1.50 per year.)

Subscribe of Senior solicitors in ycur class: Literaty-Ruth Davis, Wendell Coler, John Hanna, Harold Abbott; Engineering-
Arthur Kuhn, Saul Saulson, Walton Fiske; Law-Howell VanAuken; Medical-C. I. Wood; Dental-H. H. McUmber; Homeo-
pathic-Wm. Gramley; Pharmacy--C. C. Glover, or at office of Alumni Association, Memorial Hall.

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