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June 04, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-06-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

M higan

ily

ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CI

EXAM WITH BULKY BUCKETS
- -- -

Breathes there a man with soul so may be about,
dead, who never to himself has said, emporium will be

another thirst
introduced on

the campus Tuesday afternoon,

SENIOR LAWS JOURNEY TO
CAPITAL FOR BAR ADMISSION
-Senior laws will journey to Lansing
on June 24 to be admitted to the bar
of the state of Michigan. ' About 130
of the near lawyers will make the tri:
on a special train leaving Ann Arbor
at 7:30 a. m.
The seniors will be formally admit-
ted to the bar on motion of Dean
Bates. The new lawyers and mem-
bers of the supreme court, together
with the Attorney General will pro-
ceed to the Downey House, where
luncheon will be served at 1:00 o'clock
p. m. The afternoon will be given
over to sightseeing, the seniors re-
turning to Ann Arbor in time for the
senior banquet.

r
7
r
r
3

ILAWS

GIVE

HONOR SYSTEM
FIRST DEFEAT

Yes, the majority of us do get thirs-I
ty once in a while, especially when we
are sitting through a dusty lecture on
one of these fine tropical afternoons.
Since the old-fashioned drinking cup
has been relegated to the shelf, we
have had more sympathy for our old
high school friend, the Ancient Mari-
ner. To rescue any mariner that
DR. F. E. WILLIAMS, '12M, GETS
.. OSPITAL APPOINTMENT.
Takes Entire Charge of Splendidlyl
Equipped Psychopathic Ward
in East June 15.
Dr. Frankwood E. Williams, '07,
graduate of Wisconsin and '12M, Mich-
igan, who is a resident physician ati
the local state psychopathic ward, has
been appointed permanent executive
officer of the Boston psychopathic hos-,

when

Prof. Etward R.

Tur-I

Acceptance
ters

ner's class in English History will
combat the hot weather and "that
final" with some "harmless refresh-
ment, such as water." Two large
buckets of hature's sparkling beverage
will be placed in the room so all who
thirst may relieve their parched
throats with the liquid.
ENGITNEERS ARE TO SPEND
SUMMER ON LAKE DOUGLAS

of Code by Fresh Barris-
May Not Be Sanc-
tioned by the
Faculty.

TO

ORGANIZE

Will Live in Tents, Cook Own
and Survey Nine Hours
Every Day.

Food

FIRE

BRIGADE

Sixty-five or seventy students of the
surveying department, wil leave for
the annual summer camp on Lake
Douglaes, near the Mackinaw straits,
about June 28 under the supervision
of Prof. V. T. Johnson of the survey-

OF EMPLOYEES
Complete Equipment to be Provided;
Each Division of Campus
to be in Charge of
Forbman.
SIREN WHISTLE TO FEATURE
NEW FIRE ]RILL APPARATUS

pital. Dr. Williams will take charge ing department. Profs. H. W. King,
of his work about June 15. and H. H. Atwell and Raschbacher,
The psychopathic hospital at Ann and assistants Hugh Broadie, and C.

Arbor, the one at Boston and the in-

stitution founded at Johns Hopkins
last year, are the only hospitals of
their kind in the country and were es-
tablished in the order named.
Boston's psychopathic ward is a
million dollar structure, and is the
best equipped of the three hospitals.
The primary work is the diagnosing:
and treatment of special cases of men-
tal and nervous conditions. Research
into the causes and means of preven-
tion of insanity is another chief func-
tion of the hospital workers. A large
out-patient department, for the care
of deficient and incorrigible children
of Boston, is maintained. These chil-
dren are usually sent there by the
juvenile courts, and together with the,
mentally weak are guarded by a large
body of social workers who cooperate
with the institution. Dr. Williams
will have the supervision of all this
work.0

E

O. Corey will accompany the campers
to give practical instruction in sur-
veying.
The campers will live in tents, of
which there are about 45, and will eat
in a mess tent. Double decked steel
beds and specially constructed stoves
furnish about the only furniture in
the dwellings. A feature of the equip-
ment is a hot water bottle invented by
Professor-emeritus James B. Davis.
The schedule calls for nine hours
work. per day for every day in the
week except Sunday. The 1,800 acre
tract and the Douglass lake furnish
ample opportunity for recreation and
surveying practice.
TOASTS FEATURE ANNUAL
BANQUET OF DAILY STAFF4
Milton McRae, of Detroit, former
president of the United Press Associ-
ation, delivered the principal address
at the annual Michigan Daily dinner
at the Union last night. Sixty
members of the staffs and the board
in control were present at the last
social gathering of the year, at which
fobs were presented to forty men in
recognition Of the services on the
Daily. Prof. F. N. Scott presided.
Maurice Toulme and Adna John-
son, the managing editor and business
manager, respectively, for next year,
announced their appointments for
next year as follows: News Editor, H.
Beach Carpenter, '14; Assistant News
Editor, Fred B. Foulk, '14L; Sporting
Editor, Cordon Eldredge, '14; Assist-
ant Sporting Editor, F. M. Church, '14;
Assistants to the Business Manager,
John Leonard, '15, Sherwood Feild, '15
and H. E. Johnson, '14.
Commerce Club Elects New Officers.
Commerce club, at a business meet-
ing last night in the economics build-
ing, elected the following officers for
next year; president, Frank L. Row-
land, '14; vice-president, J. J. Lech-
ner, '14; treasurer, J. Scott Thornton,
'14; secretary, Fred Gould, 14; corres-
ponding secretary, Ben Bartlett, '14.
May have New Year's Gridiron Game,.
Robert E. Hitch, '07-'09L, is endeav-
oring to interest the athletic associa-
tion in scheduling a post-season
football game between the varsity and
the Mulknoma club of Portland, Ore.,
and was one of the backers of the
musical clubs' trip to the Pacific
coast. He is the guest of Phi Alpha
Delta fraternity while in Ann Arbor.

Squad is to Cooperate With
Forces in Case of Future,
Conflagrations.

City

A campus fire department will be
organized among the university em-
ployees, following the experience with
the burning of south wing. Campus
workmen will be organized in sepa-
rate squads for their particular line
of work, and coats, helmets, and fire
fighting equipment will be procured
for the men by the university authori-
ties.
Fire drills will be an important fea-
ture of the training of the new men,
and a siren fire whistle will serve as
a signal for the assembling of the dif-
fernt squads at their stations. Should
the signal be heard during classes,
students should not be alarmed, as it
will be frequently used as soon as the
new organization is completed, in or-
der to develop the efficiency of the
force.
Foremen of each department will
act as captains of the men under
them. The painters will have charge
of the ladders, and the electricians
wil lact as a corps to see that all
wires are disconnected. Plumbers
and steam fitters will handle the hose,
while the janitors will serve as police
and salvage workers.
J.H. Marks, superintendent of build-
ings and grounds, has charge of the
system, and will cooperate with the
city fire chief in any future fire on
the campus.
PROF. ALLEN HAS LEFT TURKEY.
Will Be in Ann Arbor About June 50
to Resume Work.I
Prof. John R. Allen, who for the
past year has been located in Constan-
tinople, sailed Sunday from Naples for
America. He will arrive here about
the middle of this month and resume
his work in the engineering depart-
ment at that time.
Prof. Allen has been on a leave of
absence from the University since
July, 1912, and he will arrive in Ann
Arbor in time for the Commencement
exercises. He has been engaged in
directing the construction work at
Roberts College, situated on a forti-
fied hill five miles from Constantino-
ple. He completed his work in Tur-
key early last month, and the only
interruption of his return trip was a
short stop over in Rome.

ADVOCATES CLAIM MATTER
WAS NOT PROPERLY PRESSED
Fresh Lits Adopt Regime in English
History for Fourth Time;
Junior Lits May Act.
The honor system met its first de-
feat on the campus yesterday when
the junior laws voted it down, 115 to
94, and, as a result, examinations in
the law department will not be taken
under student control. The vote was
taken in the evidence sections of the
class.
The decision of the freshmen last.
week in favor of the system was con-
ditioned on its acceptance by the. fac-
ulty, and it .was intimated' by the
heads of the department yesterday that
nothing would be done toward mak-
ing a change of this nature in the
method of conducting examinations
until the students had definitely and
decisively signified their wish for an
honor system. Since nothing further
will be done this year in the matter,
the question is considered as settled
as far as the department is c6ncern-
ed, for this time, at' least.
'The honor system failed to carry
for two reasons, I believe," said Ralph
M. Snyder, president of the juniors
yesterday. "In the first place, there
is not wide enough appreciation of the
fact that a great deal of cheating is
going on in the examinations as con-
ducted in the law department at the
present time. The other reason is that,
there was not enough education .as to
what the plan meant; they opposed it
more out of unreasoning prejudice
than for any other reason. This was
because there was not enough discus-
sion of the matter, and because many
did not take the trouble to inquire
into the subject."
The friends of the honor system are
not at all discouraged by this failure,
and are highly optimistic as to the
success of the plan next year. Sup-
port by the fresh lits was assured yes-
terday when for the fourth time the
English history classes under Prof. E.
R. Turner voted to take the final exam
under the honor system. The vote
was 274 to 6. No reporting of cheat-
ing is to be made, each student sign-
ing a pledge at the end of his blue
book that the work is his own and
that he has given no assistance.Those
who voted against the system are to
have a special exam under faculty
supervision.
Advocates of the honor system will
make another stand this afternoon
when the matter will be discussed by
the senior lits. It is not known wheth-
er action will be taken by the class or
not. The meeting is at 4:00 o'clock in
Tappan hall.
Junior -lits will. meet tomorrow af-

ternoon at 4:15 o'clock in the west
physics, lecture room to vote on the
system.
A committee has been at work to
formulate a code similar to that which
has been tried by other classes. The
report of the committee will be pre-
sented for the approval of the class.
Y. M. C. A. Official Attends Conference.
Wellington H. Tinker, secretary of
the University Y. M. C. A., left for
Lake Mohonk yesterday, where the
World's Student Christian Federation
is holding an international conference.

a

MIC SIA

Freshmen
Sophomores
Juniors
The best and cheapest Michigan Memory
Book is the Michiganensian. Start your
set by buying the
1913 MICHICANENSIAN

FOR SALE AT
WAHR'S BOOK STORE and SHEEHAN & CO. State Street
EAST UNIVERSITY PHARMACY and STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE, S. Univ. Ave.

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