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June 03, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER MAN
cast For Ann Arbor:
esday-Fair and warmer.

The M higan

Daily

ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

, No 176.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY JUNE 3, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

PRICE FIVE CENTS

-- -
" f

RACK SEASON
CLOSES WITH

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB ELECTS
EDITOR FOR NEW MAGAZINE.

DEATH CLAIMS

AWARD OF MS
Wolverines Finish Year When Names
,of Nine Men Are Submitted
for the Coveted
Insignia.
SEVEN ARE ELIGIBLE FOR
INTERCOLLEGIATE LETTERS.
Two Athletes Are in Line to Receive
Recognition for Work on
Relay Team.

Fred B. Foulk, '13 '15L, was elected
managing editor of the new Cosmopol-
itan club magazine yesterday after-
noon by the board appointed to make
plans for the publication. The new
magazine will appear monthly and the
first issue will be out the first week
of the college year 1913-14. It will
contain articles of interest about the
customs and life of all foreign counp=
tries written by members of the club
and by prominent persons in the cos-
mopolitan movement in the world.
It is planned also to arouse interest
by means of the magazine in the pro-
posed club house and to help raise
the necessary funds required.
SMALLPOX AGAIN
INVADES CAMPUS
Joseph W. Fitts, '14, Second Student
to Become a Victim of the
Dreaded Disease.

d
e
v
e
x
l
e

PROMINENT GRAD
Thomas W. Palmer, Donor of Palmer
Field, Died at His Home in
Detroit Sunday.

COLLEGE BUREAU
TO PLACE WOMEN
Nine Educational Institutions Active
in New Organization Which is
Opened in Chicago.

PHOEMNX MEN HOLD ANNUAL
ELECTION OF CLUB OFFICERS
Members of the Phoenix club held
their last banquet of the year last night
at Fred Bessimer's, after which the
following officers were elected for
next year:
President, F. L. Ferguson, '-14E; vice
president, F. J. Lerch, '14; secretary,
L. Catler, '15E; corresponding secre-
tary, H. Bockstahler, '15E; treasurer,
G. Sewell, '14E; sargeant-at-arms, C.
A. Madden, '14P. Ex-president H. N.
Todt, '13E, acted as toastmaster at the
banquet, and C. A. Madden, '14P, J. G.
Ferrand, '16E, W. M. Ferguson, '13E,
J. P. Reader, '13E, F. J. Lerch, '14, and

ACTIVE WORKER FOR UNIVERSITY|IICHIGAN ALUMNAE ON BOARD.

The curtain has fallen on another
season of victories and defeats on field
and track, with the victories a source
of pride to the Michigan campus, and
the sting of the defeats removed by a
consideration of circumstances. Start-
ing with a small number of candidates,
Trainer Farrell made every man count
in his selected event, and developed to
meet the Syracuse track team on a
strange gymnasium floor, the best bal-
anced squad that has ever represent-
ed Michigan in this department of
sport Injury on the heel of injury dis-
turbed this balance, but every time,
the "Gift from Ohio State University"
was equal to the emergency, and in-
stilled the spirit into the men that en-
abled them to finish third with a crip-
pled team, at the culminating fete of
the track year, the Eastern intercolle-
giates. The concluding action is to
occur behind the drawn curtain, when
the awards of the cherished "M's" are
to be made.
Following the policy decreed by the
athletic board of control, the award of
the letters in track no longer hinges
solely oh winning a place at the East-
ern intercollegiates, but goes also to
winners of first place in the principal
outdoor meet of the year and to mem-
bers of the relay teams. The Cornell
meet occupied the position of honor on
the .schedule of the past year, but all
fortunate enoungh to win an event in
this disastrous melee, are eligible in
other ways for the "M" track shirts,
jerseys and caps. One distinction is to
be noted between the awards for firsts
in the principal outdoor dual meet, the
relays and the Eastern intercollegi-
ates. The winners of points in the in-
tercollegiate are privileged to. have a
yellow stripe sewn diagonally across
the breast of the running shirt, while{
the others will wear the plain "M."
Before the formal award of the in-
signia is made, it is necessary for the
athletic board of control to act -sep-
arately on each name. Those who
have fulfilled the requirements of the
rulings on this matter and are in line
for recognition are: Capt. Haff, Jan-
sen, Bond, Seward, Kohler, Sargent,
and C. M. Smith, with the intercollegi'-
ate stripe. The plain "M's" go to Brown4
and Haimbaugh, who ran on the rec-
ordAbreaking two mile relay team at,
Philadelphia in April. There is some
(Continued on page 4.)

DOCTORS ADVISE VACCINATION.
Joseph W. Fitts, '14, is the latest vic-
tim of the smallpox, being removed to
the University detention hospital Sat-
urday with a slight attack of the mal-
ady.
Fitts was being treated last week
for la grippe by Dr. Breakey, and
Thursday morning the physician noted
certain symptoms which made the
case appear more serious than pre-
viously diagnosed. Dr. Breakey im-
mediately called Dr. J. A. Wessinger,
and the health officer isolated Fitts
for two days. Saturday, a final con-
sultation was held, with the result that
he was taken to the contagious ward.
The Zeta Psi fraternity house, in
which he roomed, was fumigated, and
all the members were vaccinated. The
house is not quarantined.
"The need for vaccination can no
better be shown than by this case,"
declared Dr. Wessinger,"Fitts does not
know where he was infected, and for
several days he walked around in total
ignorance of the disease. Everyone is
exposed to the same danger and it is
for reasons like these that arrange-
ments have been made for free vacci-
nation of all students at both hospit-
als, by the infirmary physicians, and
the city health officer.";
CATHOLIC STUDENTS CLUB TO 1
GIVE LUNCH THURSDAY NIGHT.

Thomas Witherell Palmer, Michi
gan '49, donor of Palmer athletic field
died at his Detroit home early Sunda:
morning. In his demise, the Universi
ty of Michigan loses an influentia
alumnus and the city of Detroit on
of its most valued citizens.
From the time he left Michigan t
travel abroad, Thomas itmer has al
ways been deeply interested in th
welfare of his alma mater. To the en
of furthering its interests, he mad
Palmer field, the recreationhgroun
for university women, possible. He
was a member of the Michigan Alum-
ni Association, of the Michigan club
of Detroit and until later years was al-
ways actively interested in university
matters.
ENGINEERS TO TEST NEW PUMP
AT WATER WORKS STATION
Apparatus Falls Short of Contract
But Low Steam Pressure
Was Employed.
Recent tests at the old station near
Barton dam to determine the duty
of the new pump show it to be above
par. The test was carried on by 40
mechanical engineering students un-
der the direction of Assistant Profes-
sor J. E. Emswiler.
The pump ran 50 revolutions instead
of the required 53, the duty at full
speed was 2,800,000 gallons per min-
ute or 200,000 short of the required
standard.
The figures are a bit below the re-
quirements of the contract, but the
steam pressure used in the tests was
much less than the pump is capable
of handling. The tests lasted 48 hours,
the students working in shifts of eight
hours.
MUSICAL CLUB WILL GIVE
SERENADE TOMORROW NIGHT
Members of the Glee and Mandolin
club will give their annual open-air
serenade tomorrow night. All of the
sorority houses'on last year's route
will be visited, and any other sorority
houses or league houses whose mem-
bers communicate the club manage-
ment will also be placed on the itiner-
ary. The party will start from Univer-
sity hall at 6:30 o'clock and it is plan-
ned to complete the journey shortly.
before midnight.
MANAGER COHEN OF COMEDY
CLUB APPOINTS ASSISTANTS.
The assistants for next year appoint-
ed by Manager Cohen of the Comedy
club are: assistant manager, H. Le-
Grand Nutting, '13-'15L, publicity man;
Russell H. Neilson, '14, master of cos-
tumes; B. W. Welling, '14D.
The final business meeting of the
club will be held this afternoon in the
Cercle Francais room at 4:00 o'clock.
The second tryouts will be held to-
morrow afternoon in the Cercle room
at 4:00 o'clock.

- Michigan alumnae are taking an act
, ive interest in the Chicago Collegiat
y Bureau of Occupations which has jus
- opened offices in the Fine Arts build
1 ing, Michigan avenue, Chicago, for th,
e purpose of finding positions for college
women graduates who desire work ii
0 other lines than teaching.
The organization, non-commercia
0 and cooperative in character, is th
d first of its kind in the United States
o and is starting out with a membership
d of nine educational institutions, name-
ly, Bryn Mawr, Chicago, Cornell, Illi
- nois, Michigan, Northwestern, Smith
Vassar, Wellesley, Wisconsin, besides
- the Association of Collegiate Alumnae
Mrs. James P. Angell, '91, and Miss
Mary Zimmerman, '02, are represent-
ing the University of Michigan on the
official board.
The four aims of the new bureau in-
clude acting as a clearing house be-
tween employers and employees, ad-
vice for those wishing to prepare them-
selves for special lines of work, the
investigation of new avenues of activ-
ity and opportunity for trained wom-
en, and cooperation with college au-
' thorities in bringing to. the attention
of women undergraduates the best
preparation for effective employment.
Special attention is being paid to
secretaries for literary, financial, or
executive positions, investigators, lab-
oratory assistants in physics, chemis-
try, bacteriology, and biology, book-
keepers, proof-readers, librarians,
traveling companions, couriers with
practical business experience and
knowledge of foreign countries, train-
ed nurses for executive and institution-
al positions, musicians, commercial
artists, editorial writers, and house-
hold administrators trained in domes-
tic science.
SENIOR LITS TO VOTE ON
HONOR SYSTEM TOMORROW
Senior lits will vote on the honor
system at a meeting of the class tomor-
row afternoon at 4:00 o'clock in Tap-
pan hall. Printed statements outlin-
ing the system will be distributed and
will be similar in nature to those
which were presented to the first year
laws. Several optional clauses will al-
so be given at the end of the statement.
It is planned to have all of the class-
es in the literary department take up
the system and it is hoped that the
action of the near grads will stimulate
interest in the other classes.
Banking Corporation Offers Position
An offer of a yearly salary of $1,500-
has been made by the Banking Corpor-
ation of Montana, to any 1913 gradu-
ate of the University of Michigan law
department.
Very few requirements accompany
the offer, but the letter written to Dean
H. M. Bates of the law department
from President George L. Ramsey, of
the corporation, states that an appli-
cant with a little understanding of
farm lands would be preferable.

F. C. Matthaei,
toasts.

UUNION WILL HOLD
FAREWELL DINNER
, To Feature Inaug'ural of New Officers
and a Final Reception For
the Seniors.
- DR. ANGELL WILL GIVE ADDRESS.
Any man in the university whether a
member of the Union or not is invited
to attend the last membership dinner
of the year on Thursday evening at
6:00 o'clock. At this time the presi-
dent-elect and one of the members of
the facplty board will endeavor to out-
line the policy of the Union for next
year, so that non members may ac-
quaint themselves with the organiza-
tion as it will be conducted.
The plan is to feature the dinner as
both an inaugural for the new officers
and as a farewell from the Union to
the seniors who are leaving.. Dr.
James B. Angell will deliver the fare-
well address.
Karl J. Mohr, '13, chairman of the
dinner committee,will preside as toast-
master. He will call on Prof. H. C.
Adams, elected at the recent election
as one of the three faculty members
of the board. Prof. Adams is one of
the best friends the Union has and he
will discuss to some extent the plans
for next year. Selden Dickinson, '13,
president-elect in the nature of an in-
augural address, will outline some of
his plans. Edward Kemp, '14L, who
has directed the Union in the capacity
of president during the past year,,
which has been the most successful in
its history,will review the year's work.
George Burgess, '13L, retiring vice-
president and Maurice Toulme, '14L,
vice-president-elect from the law de-
partment, will also respond to toasts.
Only a few tickets were sold to sen-
iors yesterday before they were giv-
en out to the members of the commit-
tee. Some arrangement will likely be
made however to determine how many
reservations to make for the fourth
year men who plan to attend. The
committee asks that caps and gowns
be worn.
MICHIGAN ALUMNUS TO OFFER
SPECIAL PRICES TO SENIORS
Special inducements are being offer-
ed to seniors in order to get their sub-
scriptions to the Michigan Alumnus.
The regular rate of $1.50 has been re-
duced to $1.00, and the members of
the present graduating class have the
privilege of securing this rate for
three successive years by paying in
advance.
Within a week or two every senior
will be visited by a solicitor to whom
he may give his subscription, or he
may bring it to the office of the Alum-
nus in Memorial hall. In former years
fully 50 per cent of the graduates sub-
scribed before leaving Ann Arbor, and
it is expected that the present class
will more than equal the record. Sev-
eral copies of the magazine have been
sent to the seniors during the past
college year in order to acquaint them
with its aims and purposes. .
Lacrosse Men to Meet at Gym Today.
Lacrosse enthusiasts will gather in
the trophy room of Waterman gymna-
sium this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, to
discuss plans for the inauguration of
the game at Michigan. Much interest1
is being manifested in this game
throughout the country. It is played
at Harvard, Cornell, Columbia, WestI
Point, Annapolis, Carlisle, Johns Hop-
kins, Swarthmore and Yale,

'14, responded

to

STUDENTS MAY
SPEND SUMMER
IN ARMY CAMPS
War Department Extends Invitation
to University Men to Train fr
Five Weeks With.
Militia.
PROF. GRAM TO HAVE CHARGE
OF SENDING IN APPLICATIONS.
Capt. R. 0. Van Horn, Who is Back of
the Work, Spent Three Years
at Michigan.
Michigan men will have an oppor-
tunity this summer to spend about
five weeks in a military training camp
under government supervision at a
very nominal cost to them, according
to a letter received by Pres. Hutchins
from the war department at Washing-
ton. The offer will be open to all stu-
dents over 17 years of age who are
physically fit for the work. Prof.
Grai of the engineering department
whom President Hutchins has appoint-
ed to take charge of the matter will
send in the applications of all those
who desire to take advantage of this
opportunity providing he thinks them
physically able.
The plan of the government is to
have two summer military camps,
principally for college men, one at the
Gettysburg National Park, Pennsylva-
nia, to extend from July 7 to August
15 inclusive, and theother at the Pre-
sidio of Monterey, California, from
July 1 to August 8, inclusive. The ob-
ject is to give the men military train-
ing so that in time of a national emer-
gency they will have some practical
knowledge of military affairs. The
work will include camping and march-
ing and instruction in military policy
and the actual handling of troops in
the field.
Each man will buy his own uniform
and pay his own board but the total
cost outside of transportation to and
from the camp will only amount to
about $16. Instruction in shooting by
practice on a target range will be giv-
en and opportunities to have some
training in riding cavalry horses and
in riding artillery caissons will be of-
fered. The instruction will not ex-
ceed four hours work a day, the rest
f the time to be at the students dis-
posal with due regard to proper su-
pervision and military necessities.
It is a notable fact that Captain R.
0. Van Horn of the general staff of the
U. S. army who is back of the prop-
sition is a Michigan student, having
attended this institution for about
three years.
All those who desire to take advan-
tage of this offer should hand in their
ames to Prof. Gram in his office at
oom 322 new engineering building.
I LAWS TO VOTE
ON HONOR SYSTEM
Junior laws will vote intheir Evi-
Lence sections this morning on whth-
r the honor sytem shall be instituted
n examinations. This was decided at
I class meeting yesterday afternoon,
it which the plan presented by the
ombined committees of the law de-
artment was accepted, with several

amendments, subject to ratification in
:omorrow's vote.
Several changes were made in the
plan which will be presented to the
:lass today, the most important being
hat a two-thirds majority shall be
necessary for the adoption of the
cheme. In the _matter of reporting,
the clause which stated that it should
be the duty of each student to inform
lhe honor committee of those caught
heating, was amended to read "priv-
lege and option," instead of duty.
A unanimous vote of the honor com-
nittee will be necessary for a convic-
ion, according to the ruling of the
lass made at the meeting. The class
Aso voted that,should the system car-
y, the executive officers of the class
hall be the official members of the
honor committee.

URBAN KEEPS
DENTS FEAR
able decrease of student pat-
f saloons since the arrest of
e Damm for selling liquor to
t, is attributedby saloonmen
read of students being impli-
witnesses should raids be
the police. Prosecutor George
ated that although he had no'
ion of contemplated raids up-
aloons, there was great risk
nts who frequent the saloons.
Lk the risk taken by students
ly local, but is state wide, be-
e law applies to all students
either public or private edu-
institutions in the state of
," said Burke. "I think the
f being implicated as witness-
I arrests of saloonkeepers be
not fully understood -by the
student. So far I have no
to prefer against local liquor
beyond the arrest now be-
circuit court, and this case
ainly come up for a hearing
er, contrary to the opinions

i
i
1
i
}
i
t
c

A farewell smoker and lunch will be
given by the Catholic Students' club
next Thursday night in St. Thomas
auditorium.
The toastmaster, prosecuting attor-
ney Geo. J. Burke, will call for re-
marks from Bishop Edward D. Kelley,
the Hon. M. J. Cavanaugh, J. W. Dwy-
er, Profs, McLaughlin and Hurlburt,
and Trainer Steve Farrell. Frank Mc-
Intyre, actor. and playwright, has
promised to furnish the laughs of the
evening with some of his special noted
features.
Griffins to Hold Annual Dance Tonight
Deserting, for the nonce, the service
of the Gods, Griffins will leave Mount
Olympus this evening to worship at
fairer shrines. Look to it well, High
Jove, that thy store of savory am-
brosia and thy cellars of ruddy nectar
be not touched!'
The messengers of the Gods will
hold their annual "Spring Deism" to-
night at the Country club at 9:00
o'clock, and will dance until midnight.
Cars will leave Ann Arbor at 8:06 and
9:10 o'clock. The merrymakers will

RAINBOW HUES RUN RIOT
IN FUTURIST ART EXRIBJT
Easter eggs, rainbows, Holland land- powerful and startling contrasts.Land-
scapes, and Bulgarian costumes, all scapes, seashores, rugged contours,
jumbled together in a riotous mass of and village scenes abound. Portraits

return by special car.
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION TO
PUBLISH BOOK OF RULES.
When, by a final decision of the con-
ference question, Michigan's eligibili-
ty rules shall have been determined,
the athletic association plans to pub-
lish and distribute booklets contain-
ing eligibility rules, rules governing
all athletic contests, field and track
rules, and rules concerning admission
to games. These booklets will be giv-I
en to every student.1
Due to the delay in settling the con-
ference dispute, however, the books
will probably not be issued in time for
distribution next fall.

colorful confusion on a much-bedaub-
ed artist's palette,-that is the im-
pression one receives from a first view
of the score or more Futurist concep-
tion paintings exhibited in Memorial
hall this week. Jerome S. Blum is the
man behind the brush.
"What an awful waste of perfectly
good color!" murmurs the economical
amateur artist behind you. "Humph!"
grunts an unimpressionable engineer,
in tow of a fair enthusiast, "looks to
me like a free-for-all scrap between
the British lobster-backs and a music-
al comedy Mexican army."
The unusual effect is gained by a
liberal splashing in generous quanti-
ties of the primary colors combined iri

are noticebly scarce. The artist's con-
ception of canyons and cliffs are re-
markably unique; his rocks look like
slag piles behind the Anaconda smel-
ter.
The exhibit serves a purpose, it is
explained, in preparing one for the in-
roads which Oriental ideas and color
designs are making in modern dress,
house furnishings, paint, and so on.
After seeing Futurist paintings, one is
more ready to sympathize with Bulga-
rian neckwear, petticoats, and costum-
es, Turkish tapestries, and peacock
bonnets should appear logical to the
layman.
Yes, Rudyard, "it's pretty, but-is it
'art'?"

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