100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 31, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER MAN
east For Ann Arbor:
urday-Fair and warmer; coolI
rly winds at sundown.

T h~ihigan

Daily

ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

.XXIII, No. 174.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

GENTS CLAIM RESOLUTIONS
FAVOR ENTERING CONFERENCE

Says it is First Official
'loward a Resuniption of
Membership in the
"Fold."

Step

,L NOT MAKE CONCESSIONS
THA T HUMILIATE MICHIGAN.

.ent Members of Athletie
Consider Measures of
No AvaiL

BoardI

"Far from being a stumbling block
in the way of return to the Conference,
the resolutions passed by the board
of regents Thursday night were really
the first official step toward a resump-
tion of membership in that body," de-
clared Regent Lucius L. Hubbard, of
Houghton, last evening. "As the fram-
er of thes resolutions, I can state quite
positively that thenregentsdesired
through them to indicate┬░ their wil-
lingness to treat with the Conference
on the points at issue.
"The sentiment expressed was actu-
ally a move toward meeting the Con-
ference representatives half way. We
hope that it will be understood as
such.
"But we can never agree to re-en-
ter the Conference on our knees," con-
tinued Regent Hubbard. "We must
have proper regard for the dignity of
Michigan, and we should certainly not
consent to concessions which will on-
ly humiliate us.
E mphiasize Local Control.
"As a matter of fact, the resolutions
lay especial stress upon the aptono-
my and self-control of each school in
the organization--not Michigan alone.
We believe that no measure should be
passed by the Conference which has
not the sanction of every member of
the Conference.

ARRANGEMENTS FOR SENIOR
RECEPTION BEING COMPLETED;
Barbour Gym Will be Elaborately Dec-
orated For Big Affair on
June 24.
Elaborate arrangements are being
made for the annual senior reception
to be held June 24 at Barbour gym-
nasium. Leonard Waterman, '13M, is
general chairman of the committee in
charge, of the affair. Music will be
furnished by a local orchestra and ev-
ery third dance will be a tango.
Most of the expense this year will
be lavished upon the decorations and
refreshments; the latter will be served
in Waterman gym. Gallery tickets
will be sold for 50 cents and the regu-
lar tickets will go on sale among the
class committees next week at the
usual price of $4.00. Chaperones will
be Pres. and Mrs. H. B. Hutchins and
the deans of several of the depart-
ments.
MIUCH BOUSINESS
IS TANSACTED

SENIORS WANT TO,
ADVISE FRESHMEN
About 150 prospective seniors have
responded to cooperate with the com-
mittee in charge of the freshmen ad-
visory system in carrying out a plan
whereby the care of freshmen in the
future will be left entirely to seniors.
The committee working in cooperation
with Prof. C. O. Davis and Prof. M. P.
Tilley, who have been in charge of the
faculty advisory system, expects to
obtain a senior reading room in Uni-
versity hall where freshmen can come
at all times for advice.
Some of the advisors have volunteer-
ed to return early next year 'to assist
the freshmen in electing their courses
and arranging other matters entirely
new to first year men. The commit-
tee will also obtain the names of the
prospective freshmen from the reg-
istrar's office this summer, and each
advisor will take charge of four men
with whom he will communicate be-
fore school opens in the fall, and ad-
vise throughout the year.
The object is to have the seniors
responsible not only for their advice
in scholastic work, but to instill in
the youngesters a real Michigan spirit
and rbspect for Michigan traditions as
early as possible.
The trouble heretofore has been that
the freshmen have entirely neglected
to look up their faculty advisors for
scholastic suggestions, and have been
greatly neglected by the senior advis-
ors. Henceforth the senior advisors
will be expected to call upon their
men, and the comimttee will arrange
for a number of smokers during the
year where the advisors and fresh-
:n will meet.
TO HOL BOT
CLUB REGATTA.
THISMORNING
Contestants Will Report Near Power
House at Barton Dam to Hear
Rules of Meet
Explained.
PORTAGE CONSTRUCTED AT
PULP MILL FOR CANOEISTS.
Bus Line to Carry Spectators From
Court House to Pond
at 8:45.

MAY PROVIDE FOR
WOMEN'S COUNCIL
Michigan's -first self-government
board for women will probably be pro-
vided for at the meeting of the newly
elected executive committee of the
Women's League today. Irene Big-
alke, president for next year, expects'
to appoint from the executive board a
committee to draft resolutions for
women self-government. This com-
mittee will submit these plans to the
non-athletic committee for faculty
sanction.
The newvcommittee is composed of:
Margaret Supe, '15, Mildred Neuchter-
lein, '15, Helen Humphries, '16,,
Ilda Jennings, '14, Blanche Wash-
burne, '16, Laura Feige, '15, Clara Sar-
geant, '15, Hester Robinson, '14, Flor-
ence Bennie, '16, Helen Brandenbury,
'14, Helen Malcomson, '15, Carol Dow,
'14, Mildred Rees, '15. The five at large
independent members are: Frances
Farnum, '15, Jeannette Higgins, '14,
Sophia Hermann, '14, Louise Robson,
'14, and Louise Murkley, '15.
NOTED JOURNALIST TO SPEAK
AT ANNUAL DAILY BANQUET.
Mr. Milton McRae, of Scripps-Mc-
Rae syndicate, Detroit, and former
president of the Detroit Chamber of
Commerce, will be the guest at the an-
nual banquet of The Michigan Daily
staff to be held at the Union Tuesday
evening, June 3, at 6:30 o'clock. Prob-
lems confrontin4 practical journalists
will be discussed by Mr. McRae at the
banquet.
Professor Fred N. Scott of the rhet-
oric department will officiate as toast-
master, and speeches will be made by
Dean John R. Effinger and Professors
J. W. Glover and W. G. Stoner.
C.OMEDY C LsUmB
TONHAVE HELP
OF PRODUCERS
Prize Winning Piece Will Be Read by
Prominent Theatrical Men
Fog Trial on Profes-
sional Stage.
STUDENT PLAYWRIGHTS HAVE 3
ENCOURAGEMENT OF FROHMAN

GRADUATE PRAISES SYSTEM
OF PLAYGROUND INSTRUCTION
Fred Lawton,'11, Says Work With Ann
Arbor School Children Furnishes
Opportunity For Experience.
"The idea of Michigan men taking
igan students in Ann Arbor is receiv-
ing recognition on the outside, was ev-
idenced by the following statement
made yesterday by J. Fred Lawton, '11,
probation officer of Detroit, a speaker
at the Charities conference here:
"The idea of Michigan men taking
hold of the playground work in con-
nection with the Ann Arbor schools is
a splendid one, because of the call for
young men, experienced in this line
of work, that is being issued in all
large cities. This movement should
furnish an ideal school for Detroit
playground workers, who are chosen
each summer from college men who
have had experience."
H ARD I 1N OVE R
Wolverines Forced to Go Ten Innings
Before J)efeatinig the
Plow Boys
5-A.t
CLEVER FIELDING SAVES
THE DAY FOR MICHIGAN.

BY

NINE WOLVERINE ATHLETES
QUALIFY IN PRELIMINARIES

REG ENTS!

Many Fellowsbips for Year 1913-'14
Are Awarded, Including Stipends
For State College.
Students.
TO PLACE LA-PS AND BENCHES
IN FRONT OF NEW AUDITORIUM
Authorize Publication of Another Edi-
tion of Booklet on Michigan.
Trees.

"Doc" Baibeiu May Ts the
in Concluding Game
Today.

Pill

"At present it is up to the student'
dy and alumni to impress upon the
inference the sincerity of the re-
nts' desire to negotiate a. return.
ir action was not an idle statement
position-it was, I hope, a basis
' future action."
When asked as to whether the board
regents would maintain its present
and if this proved unsatisfactory to
e Conference, Mr. Hubbard said that,
his belief, the inherent generosity
the Conference representatives
>uld eventually help to effect a
aceful settlement of the existing'
Terences.
Regent Beal, of Ann Arbor, when
sn last night, reiterated the interpre-
ion of the resolutions given by Re-
nt Hubbard.
Regents Want Action.
'The resolutions simply state, in a
gnified manner, the give-and-take
irit with which we hope to adjust the
Atter of re-entrance," said Mr. Beal.
Te are not evading action, but rather
viting it."
That the reolutions adopted by the
gents would seem on their face to
d nowhere, was the opinion of Prof.
ans Holbrook, retiring member of
board of control of athletics, when
erviewed yesterday.
'The regents' resolutions seem in-
ided to evade the real question as
whether Michigan is going back to
West, or is going to continue to
rust itself into the East, which is
eady athletically over-crowded,"
,ted Burke Shartel '11-'13L, who ex-
essed a strong pre-conference atti-
le in a speech given at the Cap
ght ceremonies one week ago.
Hits Regents' Stand.
It was to be hoped that this ques-
n would be squarely met and not
ded with subtle refinements in ne-
rd to athletic home rule and Mich-
(Continued on page 3.)

Michigan, Cornell and Pennsylvania
Will Wage Three Cornered
Battle at Cambridge
Today.
MAIZE AND BLUE STARS ARE
DOPED FOR SECOND IN MEET
Ithacans Slated to Be Victorious;
Quakers Mlay Take Third
Place.
(Special to The Michigan Daily.)
CAMBRIDGE, MASS., May 30.-With
nine men qualifying in the preliminar-
ies, Michigan steps up a notch, in the
figuring of track followers at the East-
ern Intercollegiates ,in the Harvard
stadium, and is looked to follow Cor-
nell in the finals, with Pennsylvania
a close third. Bond in the 100 and
220, Seward in the 220, Haff and Jan-
sen in the 440, Craig in the low hurd-
les, Sargent in the high jump, and
Kohler in the shot put and hammer
throw with Smith and Brown in the
mile and two mile, are the Wolverines
who will fight to overthrow precedent
and place the Maize and Blue in the
van tomorrow. Cornell, with 11 men
qualified in 9 events, and the redoubt-
able Jones to be reckoned with in the
mile, seems to have the firmest grip
on the victory. Pennsylvania slated
for second place, qualified only 8 men
in four events, and although with some
prospects in the distances does not
seem to have the strength to displace
Michigan from second.
The ill-luck that dogged Seward in
the intercollegiate preliminaries a year
ago was present today, when he was
set back a yard in the hundred yard
dash for a false start. This misfor-
tune shattered his chances for place,
as he had drawn the fastest heat of
the afternoon, won by Lippincott of
Penn, in 10 seconds flat. Bond got
away in good shape and won his heat
in the century dash without extending
himself. Both the Michigan sprinters
landed firsts in their respective heats
in the 220 yard dash, and should figure
prominently in tomorrow's running.
Haff and Jansen lived up to all ex-
pectations on the easy wy they cap-
tured first in their heats in the quarter
mile. The Michigan captain was of-
fered no first class opposition in his
race and .was able to ease up at the
finish, clipping off the distance in 50
4-5 seconds. Jansen ran his heat in
50 3-5 seconds.
Brown and Lamey represented Mich-
igan in the half mile but were unable
to qualify for the finals. Brown and
Smith will run tomorrow in the mile,
with a possibility of Smith entering
the two mile instead of the mile. In
this event Lamey will start in the
mile to pace Brown.
In the low hurdles, Craig experienc-
ed no trouble in winning a slow heat,
and should be able to make much bet-
ter time tomorrw when the incentive;
which was lacking today, will be pres-
ent. The injury to his leg makes him
less certain of repeating his last year's
victory in this race, but he should at
least land second.
Kohler placed in the shot put and then
hammer throw, with marks that are
far below his capabilities when in
shape. The distance made in the shot
put will count for the finals, but both
Kohler, and Beatty of Columbia, who
is picked to win the event, will have to
depend upon tomorrow's showing as
they now stand third and fourth. Koh-
er should be able to appropriate sec-
ond, as he did last year. In the ham-
mer throw, the Michigan weight man
is more of an unknown quantity, as he
has improved his form, and should do
(Continued on page 2.)

At the meeting of the board of re-
gents Thursday night appointments to
fellowships for the year 1913-'14 were
made. The Buhl classical fellowships
were awarded to Charles W. French,
stipend $300 and Robert W. Adkison,
stipend $200; the Mather classical fel-
lowship of $300 to James E. Dunlap;
Michigan gas association fellowships
to Carl K. Wirth, $500, and Robert R.
Tennant, for the first semester, $250;
Acme White Lead and Color Works
fellowship of $500 to John Crowe
Brier.
The state college fellowships were
awardc4 as follows: Helen Wolcott,
Adrian College; Carl Rufus, Albion
College; Claud W. Saterlee, Alma Col-
lege; Clara Triplet, Hillsdale College;
Albert E. Lampen, Hope College; Geo.
K. Ferguson, Kalamazoo College;
Richard E. Bissel, M. A. C.; William
V. Hoyt, Olivet College; Ivan Packard,
Albion College; Verna Shultz, Hope
College. F. J. Burris Munn was ap-
pointed to fill the vacancy among the
$300 fellowships caused by the resig-
nation of Herman A. Clark.
Transact Much Minor Business.
Lamps and benches were provided
to be placed in front of the new audi-
torium and to be designed by Albert
Kahn, of Detroit. Cabinets were au-
thorized to be built to house the mu-
sical instruments in the new building
so as to get them out of the museum
into a fire proof structure. Albert
Kahn, of Detroit, was also appointed
architect of the new science building.
An expenditure of $400 was allowed
from the Palmer field fund for the
construction of a fence around Palmer
field.
Dr. Cummings accepted the position
(Continued on page 4.)

Manuscripts┬░ Must Be Submitted
Committee of Judges
Next Fall.

to

The first annual regatta of the Mich-
igan Union Boat club will be held on
Barton pond this morning. The first
event, the long distance swimming
match will begin at promptly 9:15
o'clock, and the other events, short
distance swimming, singles, doubles
and mixed double canoe races, tilting
and diving matches will folow each
other in rapid succession, the last
event being scheduled for 11:00
o'clock.
The contestants are expected to re-
port at the power house at the Barton
dam at 9:00 o'clock, 'and the rules
will be explained to them at that time.
The hearts of all the entrants will
be examined before they will be allow-
ed to compete, and every safeguard
will be taken to prevent the possibil-
ity of accidents.
Owing to the fact that express on
the single racing shells would cost
nearly $50, the officials finally decided
against the plan of bringing the shells
from Detrtoit. This means that the
spectators at the regatta will not have
the chance of seeing a race between
(Continued on page 4.) -

Plans for a professional production
of the prize winning play for the
Comedy club for next fall are progres-
sing rapidly. Manager Cohen has re-
ceived letters from Charles Frohman
and David Belasco in reference to the
plan, and both promised to do all in
their power to help the local organi-
zation.
This means that the $100 play will
receive a public reading in the offices
of the two producers at least, and also
that either will take charge of the
play if it promises well.
"I am always glad to hear of any
movement in the colleges that will
tend to stimulate the interest of stu-
dents in drama and playwriting,"
wrote Mr. Frohman. "I have often said
that the only way to learn to write
plays is to write them, and the prize
offered will undoubtedly induce an
effort in the right direction. The
great need of the American stage at
the present time is plays-plays of
American life, and I will always be
anxious to encourage in any way in my,
(Continued on page 4.)

l
t
1
C
i
C
1
F
Y
t
x
f
f
a
r
e
s
p
d
t:
t...

It took the Wolverines ten innings
yesterday to down the Farmers in the
first of the two game series, and it was
only clever fielding that allowed that
fortunate ending. The Cultivators
looked helpless for four innings while
Michigan was gathering in tallies from
the delivery of Blake Miller, the Aggie
football star, but after that four in-
nings, conditions were reversed and
the last part of the.contest was real
baseball.
Quaintance started the pitching for
Michigan and for four innings the lit-
tle fellow mowed the Farmers down
in one, two, three order, allowing only
one hit and not passing a man. But all
time he was using simply a curve ball
and when the curve lost its sense of
direction and started to ramble, troub-
le ensued. In the fourth he filled the
bases with none out and then allowed
all the runners to score on wild heav-
es. Starting the fifth he allowed three
hits that intoxicated the stations and
then resigned, Baribeau taking up the
burden. The doctor got away in fine
style, only one runner scoring, and
after that for five innings he had ev-
erything his way, pitching beautiful
ball.
Miller, the Aggie hurler, reversed
Quaintance's stunt and was easy for
four innings. Then he tightened up
and the Wolverines never came near a
run until the tenth. The fielding be-
hind Miller was of the cleanest vari-
ety and several sharp bits of work
saved him early in the game. Dawson,
playing the left garden for the visitors
pulled off two catches that were won-
ders, and the entire Aggie aggrega-
tion played erorrless ball. Baker, for
Michigan played a stellar game, and
the fielding was .good. A peculiar fea-
(Continued on page 4.)

TODAY

...

ission 50c. M.

A. C. vs. MICHIGAN BASEBALL GAME, Ferry Fie d 2:30 P. M
DETAILED REPORTS FROM INTERCOLLEGIATE MEET WILL BE RECEIVED BY DIRECT WIRE TO FIELD

I.

I'

r

..

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan