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May 28, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-28

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Michigan

Daily

ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR
PRICE FIVE CENT

o. 17. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, 1913.

."

NAME MANAGERS,
OF 1914 OPERA
Mimes Coose Karl B. Hoch, '14, and
R. H. Braun, '14E, to Head
Committees.

STAGE FAREWELL
CONCERT TONIGHT
(Gie: and Mandolin Clubs Will Combine
With GIrls' Glee Club in
R'tg:imo Selections.

WILL HOLD ELECTIONS TONIHT. POPlAliR PRICES WILL PREVAIL

Karl B. Hoch, '14, was appointed
general chairman of the 1914 Michigan
Union opera yesterday afternoon. Rob-
ert H. Braun, '14E,was named as
chairman of the costumes committee.
The appointments were made by the
committee on committees of the Mimes
consisting of Jacob Crane, '13E, chair-
man, Edward Kemp, '14L, Philip
Fletcher, '13E, Selden Dickinson, '13,
and Homer Heath.
Competition for the general chair-
manship this year was exceptionally+
keen, and the committee found it dif-
ficult to select the man for the place.
Three meetings were held before a de-
cision was reached. Cyril Quinn, '14,
Karl B. Hoch, '14, and R. H. Braun,
'14E, assistants to this year's general1
chairman, P. K. Fletcher, were the men]
eligible for the appointment.
The position of costumes manager
goes hand. in hand with the chairman-
ship, and ranks practically as im-
portant. There are a number of ap-
pointments yet to be made, of whichi
the property chairman and the three+
assistants to the general chairman
will probably be selected within a few'
days. The publicity committee, as-
sistant treasurer. and assistants to the
costume and property chairmen will+
not be announced until next fall.
The mimes meet tonight at the Un-
ion for the annual spring elections to
membership. All men who have tak-
en part in at least one opera as a mem-
ber of the cast, orchestra, or commit-
tee are eligible, and from this number
the new members will be chosen. All
men connected with an opera are con-
sidered associate members until it has
been presented, when this relation-
ship expires.
Reports from Chicago indicate that+
the Alumni association lost money in
presenting the show there, but they
are enthusiastic about the venture
nevertheless, and are panaing to take
steps toward making tive trip an an-+
uual affair. The enthusiasrn with
which it was received has apparently
more than made up for a sli'ht money
loss. As one alumnus put it "If we
can't have Michigan up here in foot-
ball, we can have her in the opera."
FRESHMEN LAWS WILL VOTE
ON HONOR SYSTEM 1 TOMORROW
Fresh laws will vote on the plan of
taking examinations under the honor
system, in the several sections on
Thursday afternoon. Printed copies,
,f the plan proposed, bearing possible
imendments, will be distributed as
ballots and, if possible, the end of each
hour will be given over to discussion
and the taking of the vote.
A representative number of the
class was not present at the class
meeting yesterday, so it was decided
:o adopt the plan of having a vote on
the question when the classes are in
session. The result of the vote, if
there is a majority in favor of an
honor system, will be submitted to the
faculty as the expression of the sen-
timent of the class on the proposition.
DEAN COOLEY LEAVES FOR
TWO WEEK'S STAY IN EAST.
Dean M. E. Cooley of the engineering
lepartment, left yesterday afternoon
'or Baltimore to consult with his phy-
sician and also attend the annual re-
union of the class of '78, Annapolis,
June 5. Although the health of the
dean has not been good the last year,
there is nothing serious in his condi-
tion at present, but he made the trip
to see the physician before he leaves
for abroad. The dean will return in
about two weeks.

Ratme, stunts, and quartet har-
mony will be the order of the evening
at the combined concert of the Michi-
gan Glee and Mandolin club and the
Girls' Glee club, to be given tonight at
8:03 o'ciock in University Hall. The
progra.n for the affair has been ar-
ranged so as to include a preponder-
ance of popular selections, and those
in charge promise that it will be far
from a heavy performance that will be
offered.
"Sail ca Si. cry Moon," "Jerusalem
Mornin'," "Cn the Trail of the Lone-
some Pit:e," and "You Great, Big Blue-
eyed Baby," will be part of a merry
me!ange of tun:fulness to be rendered
by the Midnight Sons' quartet. Waldo
Fellows, chief comedian with the Glee
club, whore st:nts made a hit on the
recent tr:p o that organization to the
Pacific Coast, will be on the program
with a number of specialties.
Popular prices, as well as popular
selections, will prevail for tonight's
concert. Admission will be 25 cents
with a few seats reserved at 50 cents.
Tickets may be secured at the State
strcet beck-storcs, or at the box oice
in University hall immediately pre-
ceding the affair.
WIRELESS HOLDS ENDURANCE
TESTS WITH SOUTH DAKOTA.
Twelve Hour Experiments Are Made
to Determine Strength of
Trnsmission
The nnIver::ty wiretess statIon made
a scries of tests with the one located at
the Uriversity of North Dakota, from
6:03 p. m. Monday till 6:00 a. m. yes-
terday. Messages were sent every
hour by the local station.-
The tests were made to determine
the strength of the wireless transmis-
sion, espec:ally at night time. The
operator at North bakota received the
strongest transmissions .between 1:00
and 3:00 o'clock in the night. Com-
plete data of tha results will be made
later.
No experiment of this kind has eve
been made before over large areas of
land, excepting those made by com-
mercial stations. Scientific experi-
mental stations, situated along sea-
shores and large bodies of water, have
made similar tests; but the results
were considerably affected by reflected
light..
SENIOR LITS DROP BANQUET
May Forego Annual Feed On Account
of Senate Ruling.
Senior lits will have no class ban-
quet this year, owing to the rule of the
senate council in regard to out o'
town functions. This was practically
settled when no action was taken by
the class at a meeting held yesterday
afternoon to decide concerning the af-
fair.
The matter was discussed at length
and it was decided that, as it was nec-
essary to obtain the consent of the
senate council for a banquet in De-
troit or Toledo, and as a petition pre-
viously presented had been turned
down, it was best to let the matter
drop.
Graduate Will Represent University
Guy H. Albright, '99, has been ap-
pointed by President Harry B. Hutch-
ins to represent the university at the
twenty-fifth anniversary of the ad-
ministration of President Slocum of
Colorado College at Colorado Springs.
Col., June 11. Albright is now profes-
sor of mathematics at Colorado Col-
lege.

CO)M3I"NICA TIN.
Editor The Michigan Daily:
We are informed by an official of the
athletic association that at the base-
ball games with Pennsylvania, to be
played on Ferry field June 23 and 25,
admission prices of 50 and 75 cents
will be charged to all who enter, re-
gardless of whether they are students
or not. If this program is carried out,
it will mean that the purpose of the
blanket tax of five dollars, paid last
fall by every student in the university
and thought by him to entitle him to
admission to every athletic contest on
Ferry field this school year, has been
mnisunderstood and the tax paid under
a miapprehension.
Our informant justified this charge
in the ground that the "school year'
ended June 15 (the Pennsylvania gam-
es being therefore "post season" gam-
es), and on the further ground that
these games were scheduled after the
coupon book, which has so far this
year admitted students to contests,
Aad been made up. With regard to
the first of these reasons, we believe
chat it is a mere playing with words, as
w;; are quite sure that in the minds
.f all on the campus the "school year'
.oes not end until Commencement;
and with regard to the second reason,
we do not understand that the admis-
:xon of students to athletic contests
ree of charge, under the blanket tax,
was conditioned on the time when the
;oupon book was made up, or on the
.umber of coupons included in it
We believe that, if admission is
charged to students for the games with
?ennsylvania, an understandin; held
>y every undergraduate on the cam-
>us will be violated and a gross in-
justice will be done to the student
body.
Yours respectfully,
HAROLD F. DOUGLAS,. '13.
ROBERT P. LANE, '13. -
HAROLD P. SCOTT, '13.

Student councilmen, recently elect.
ed, were sworn in and initiated to'the_
luties at the regular meeting of the
organization held last night. The firs!
year law controversy was decided b.
allowing only one man, J. S. Booksc
to take his seat. It was discoveretc
.hat the law department is entitled
only to four men, and, as there are two
old men who retain their seats in the
council and one new member from thei
junior class, Books only was seated,,
since he received the highest number.
of votes.
Reports of spring games and cal
night committees were presented anc.
.nany suggestions offered for futures
celebrations. Chairman H. Wilson, '13,
of the pushball committee recommend-l
ed that the field be made mu(-h shorter,
advocating that its length be reduced
that the contest be divided into four
quarters with a 10 minute interval be-
:ween halves. Chairman G. F. Brown.
13E, of the tug-of-war committee ad-
wised that the teams be composed o
only 50 men in the future, because of
the difficulty of getting sophomores to
come out for the event.
Chairman H. S. Hulbert, '14M, of the
cap night committee, advocated that
all saloons and theaters be closed a'
8:30 p. m. on the night of the celebra-
tion. He also recommended that onl3
photographers who have secured per-
mits from the student council be al-
lowed to take pictures at any even!
which is supervised by that organi-
zation. Many other suggestions were
made by the committee for the better-
ing of the freshman celebration.
Individual members of the council
voted to purchase six dining room
chairs which will be donated to the
Michigan Union.
STOCK OF 3ICHIGANENSIANS
IS ALMOST ENTIRELY SOLD.
The unusually heavy sales of the
1913 Michiganensian have almost ex-
hausted the entire edition of 1.200 cop-
ies. Only 100 volumes of the year book
remain unsold, and, according to Bus-
iness Manager Carl G. Schoeffel, '13,
these will be disposed of before Sat-
urday. The remaining books are on
sale at the State street book stores.

MAKE CHARITY
CONFERENCE AN.
Delegates to Organize on Permanent
Basis; Prominent Speakers
Discuss Various Social
Problems.
VISITORS WILL TOUR CAMPUS
AND BOTH HOSPITALS TODAY
3layor Brand Whitlock, Rabbi Frank-
fin, Caroline Bartlett Crane,
and 01Ohers Speak Today.
That the present Michigan State
Conference of Charities and Correction
is destined to become an annual event,
was practically assured last night
when Father Schmidt of Grand Rapids,
.r. I H. J. Simpson of Lansing and
Mrs. C. D. Burritt of Cadillac were
named as a comimttee to nominate the
;eneral olicers for a conference to
be held next year. The place for the
1914 meeting will be selected tomor-
row.
Public health was the subject for
;onsideration at the meeting yester-
day morning and afternoon. The speak-
,rs in the morning were Dr. A. S.
Narthin and D. E. McClure, assistant
secretary of the state board of health.
in the afternoon the meeting was ad-
Iressed by Dr. E. A. Christian, super-
intendent of the Pontiac State hospitals
?r. G. L. Kiefer, health officer of De-
;roit and Miss L. M. Burton, chief wo-
nan inspector of the Department of
labor..
Alexander Johnson,. of Angola, Ind.,
secretary of the national conference,
Jiscussed the problem of public relif.
is against private relief at the meeting
ast night.
Bishop J. N. McCormick, chair
>f the state board of corrections and
charities, told of the work the state
aad been doing, with particular atten-
.ion to the institutions.
Playgrounds and' the general recr -
ition movement Were discussed in a
stereoptican lecture by Mr. Charles Ht
Mills, supervisor of recreation In
Grand Rapids. He showed pictures
of playgrounds in many of the cities
:hroughout the country, iand treated
especially the work in Grand Rapids.
1. Fred Lawton, '11, Will Read Paper.
The program for the meetings today
is as follows:
9:00 a. ni., Housing and Recreation.
Speakers, Mayor Brand Whitlock of
Toledo, the Rev. Caroline Bartlett
crane of Kalamazoo, Rabbi Leo Vly
ooranklin of Detroit, and G. A. Bellamy
of Cleveland. General discussions will
be led by Dr. V. C. Vaughan, Mayor
D. C. Sauer of Jackson, and C. H. Mills.
9:00 a. m., Children's committee.,
Round Table Session. Speaker, Judge
H. S. Hulbert of Detroit. The general
discussion will be led by J. Fred Law-
ton, probation officer of Detroit who
-ill read a paper on probation. Law-
-on is a Michigan graduate of the class
of 1911 and was prominent in canmpus
affairs.
In the afternoon, the delegates will.
be taken upon a tour of inspection
'hrough the university buildings and
grounds. From 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock
they will be entertained at a reception
at the home of Regent and Mrs. J. E.
Beal.
8:00 p. in., Children's Work. Speak-

ers, Dr. C. E. Chadsey of Detroit, J. B.
Montgomery of Coldwater, and Dr. J.
U. McIndoo of Farmington. Discus-
sions will be led by Miss Ada Freeman
of Detroit and Fred M. Butzel of De-
troit.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB WILL
PICNIC AT WHITMORE LAKE.
--
Arrangements have been made for
the Cosmopolitan club picnic to be
held at Whitmore Lake Friday. The
special car will be attached to the
Ann Arbor train, which leaves at 8:40
a. m. At the lake. the day will be
spent in games, including a Cosmopoli-
tan Marathon and a baseball game,
Sailboats and row boats have been
engaged to help entertain the mem-
hers. The return trip will be made al
7:00 o'clock.

i

TONIGHT RAGTIME FEATURES

TONIGHT

Big Popular Concert
GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUB
GIRLS' GLEE CLUB
A QUARTER ADMITS UNIVERSITY HALL 8:00 O'clock TICKET SALE AT DOOR

7

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