100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 27, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER MAN1T
,cast For Ann Arbor:
esday-Rain and colder. I

T chi1aQ

Daily

ONLY 1=ORNIMPAPER IN
I ANY ARBOR

01. XXIII, No. 170.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 27, 1913.

PRICE. FIVE CEN

SISLER'S SORE
ARM MAY KEEP
HIM FROM BOX
Star Twirler Injures Wing Throwing
From Field in Pennsy Game
and Will Probably Not
Pitch Again.
WOLVERINES HIT BALL HARD
WHILE ON EASTERN JOURNEY
Seven Bat Above 800 Mark and Five
Have a Perfect Average in
the Field.
George Sisler, Michigan' ,phenom-
enal twirler, will probably not be an
the mound again this season, but may
be used against Pennsylvania in one
of the post season contests.
His arm has not been in good condi-
tion this year, but Coach Rickey be-
lieves the soreness to be nothing se-
rious. While tending the right garden
in the Penn game Sisler made a long
throw to the plate which probably was
itesponsible for the change for the
worse in the throwing member, which
will keep him from working in the
box.
While the heavy hitting Wolverin-
es were invading the' eastern towns,
seven of the members of the squad hit
tehe ball for an average of over 800;
while five of the ball tossers fielded
perfectly. Captain Bell leads the list
with a fielding average of 1,000 and se-
curing nine safeties out of eighteen
trips to the plate. Webber solved the
deliveries of the opposing pitchers for
seven clean ones in the fifteen times at
bat, while Cory hit at a .421 clip and
made no slips in the field. McQueen
and Sisler each have a .388 average
for the four games. Hughitt has a
.384 mark.
The team batting average for the
trip 'is .378 and the fielding average
is .847. The team accepted 144 chanc-
es out of 170 and hit safely 63 times
out of 140 times at bat.
(Continued on page 4.)
CHEER LEADERS WILL WORK
REGULARLY AT THE UNION.
The new system for selecting cheer
leaders will be formally begun tomor-
row afternoon at the Union when C.
M. Otis, '14M, will instruct the candi-
dates from 4:30 to 6:30 o'clock and'
thereafter at hours to be arranged.
Six men have signed their intention-
of trying out and any others wishing
to compete must send their names to
H. S. Hulbert by mail before tomorrow
noon.
The men will try out before the
baseball bleachers at the games on
Friday and Saturday of this week and
the date for the election of the four
men who will lead the yells next year
will be announced later.
CALIFORNIAN WILL TAKE
PLACE OF PROF. SMALLEY.
Stuart Daggert, professor of eco
nomics of the University of California,,
will be appointed at the next meeting
of the board of regents to fill the va-
cancy in the economics department
caused by the death of Prof. Smalley.
Several weeks ago Prof. Daggert de-
livered a series of lectures to the eco-
nomics classes, and was well liked by
all who heard him. He has held his
present position for the past four
years, during which time he has distin-

guished himself as a scholar of eco-
nomico.+
MUSICAL CLUBS ACCOMPANY
ALL SENIOR SING TONIGHT.}
Seniors of all departments will gath-
er on the steps of Memorial hall to-
night at 7:00 o'clock for an all senior
sing, and both the glee and mandolin
clubs will be out to help along the
harmony. The committee desires that
caps and gowns be worn and that ev-
eryone be on hand promptly. The9
program will consist of a mixture of]
college songs and popular airs.
The all senior sings are held every
other week on Thursday, the one]
scheduled for fonight being postponed

MAKE INSPECTION TOUR OF
MODERN SCIENCE BUILDINGS
Faculty Committee Will Visit Western
and Eastern Institutions
to Secure Ideas.
An inspection tour of all the large
modern science buildings -in this coun-
try, is being made by a special com-
mittee from the university for the pur-
pose of securing information on the
best types of science halls. The tour
will include Rochester, Syracuse, Cor-
nell, Columbia, Yale, Harvard, and
Princeton, in the east, and Chicago,
Illinois, and Wisconsin in the west.
Prof. J. E. Reighard, chairman of the
inspection committee, left Sunday, and
Professors Newcombe and Kraus left
yesterday afternoon. They will be
joined later by Profs. Hobbs and Shep-
ard. Regent W. L. Clements and Sec-
retary Shirley Smith will leave after
the regents' meeting next Thursday.
The inspection of the western build-
ings will be made as soon as the com-
mittee returns from the east.
CAMPUS TEAMS,
AGAIN TRY FOR
CHAMPIONSHIP1
Junior Laws and Soph Engineers Will
Meet For Second Time to'
Decide Interclass
Honors.
SPENCER. ANI) HXDION WILL
PROBABLY DO THE HURLING
Both Teams are Confident of Winning'
the Title and a Fast Game
is Predicted.

STUDENTS MAY
ATTACK CIVIC
EVILSOF DAY
Bureau for Study of Legislative and
Municipal Problems Will be
instituted on Campus
:ext Year.
DR. ANGELL DENOUNCES SEX
STORIES AT CHARITY MEET.
Gov. Ferris Was Unable to Attend
Opening Conference of
Social Workers.
A bureau for the study of legisla-
tive and municipal problems and gov-
ernment is to be established next year,
according to President Harry B.
Hutchins, in his address at the open-
ing session of the Michigan State Con-
ference of Charities and Corrections,
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall last
night.
"The gravest questions of the pres-
ent day," said Pres. Hutchins, are
problems concerned with city govern-
ment. In the solving of these prob-
lems, the university can be of, the
greatest help, and it is for this end
that this work will be started here."
Pres. Hutchins, who is head of the
conference, told of the wide field in
which the university is of service to
the state. In the matter of charity, he
described the character of the people
who are treated in the hospitals and
dental clinic. The hospitals, he said,
treat 10,000 cases annually, and the
dental clinic 5.000. The Pasteur In-
stitute, said the president, has treated
1,056 cases since its founding in 1903,
and not one case treated has resulted
fatally.
President-emeritus James B. Angell
gave an address, in which he described
charitable methods when he was a boy
in Rhode Island. Problems of social
reform and service were unknown in
those days, he said; only abolition and
temperance were discussed. Dr. An-
gell attacked the fiction of the day, de-
claring that "short stories and prob-
(Continued on page 4.)
NEW COUNCILMEN,
SWORN IN TONIGHT
New Legish tors Must Have Election
Certificate Properly Signed,
and Read Constitution.
i RESH LAW QUESTION COMES UP.I
S* * * * * * * * * *

F
d
t

FRATERNITIES
TO LEGISLATE
ON PLEDGING
Interfraternity Conference Takes Up
Matter of Rushing New Men,
Following Recent Senate
Ruling.
NEW MEASURE PROVIDES FOR
UNIFORM PLEDGING DATE

Four Days Earlier in Year Set
For Entertainment of
Freshmen.

Aside

MICHIGAN MNEDIC GRADUATES
LEAD HARIVARD AND HiOPKINS
Technical Preparation of Local Men
Shown to be Superior in
Recent Tabulations.
That Michigan medical graduates are
at least' 10 par cent better in their tech-
nical preparation than Harvard grad-
uates and at least 5 per cent better
than Johns Hopkins graduates, is the
onclusion warranted by recent tabular
statistics published in the last num-
ber of the Journal of the American
Medical Association.
Statistics showing. the results of
state board examinations of graduatcs
of all medical schools in the country,
give the graduates of both Michigan
medical schools very creditable stand-
ings, and they show that of the Mich-
igan men who have been
graduated since 1908, none fail-.
ed to pass. Of the graduates
from Johns Hopkins medical school
during the same period, more than 5
per cent failed to pass, and from Har-
vard graduates examined during this
period, more than 10 per cent failed.
POPULAR AIRS
WILL, FEATURBE
LAST CONCERT

i

DAMM BOUND
OVER TO FALL
TERM OF COURT
Sxaloonist Charged With Selling Liquor
to Students Week Ago Held
For Trial After
E xam~inlltioII.
(10MPLANANT SAYS IE WAS
NERVOUS AFTER INTERVIEW
Proseeutor Says He Will Call No More
Stdent Witnesses, and
iisfaxors Spotters.
Lawrence Damm, saloonist, accused

The junior laws and soph eagineers
will try again to decide the campus
championship this afternoon on the
South Ferry field diamond at 4:00
o'clock. The game Saturday to decide
which aggregation would receive the
honor resulted in a 6' to 6 tie and so
the contest today is sure to be a fight
to the finish.
Haddon will be sent to work on the
mound for the engineers and.Spencer
will probably go back for the laws
altough Dobson may be the choice of
manager Witherow if the speed art-
ist's arm is in condition. Shepard will
do the backstopping for the boiler-
makers and Lackey is booked to work
with the big mitt for the laws.
The lineups will be practically the
same as, used Saturday with the ex-
ception of the third sack for the jun-
iors, which may be covered by Hippler
if Witherow's ankle is in shape to al-
low him to cover the right garden,
and Metcalf will no doubt be used in
the field for the engineers.
It is hard to dope out the result of
today's game from the contest Satur-
day, because the teams at that time
were evenly matched. The laws were
the heavy hitters, while the engineers
went the nine innings without an error.
Both teams are sure of winning today,
and if confiderice has anything to do
with the kind of baseball played, both
aggregations will display some real
work.
COMEDY CLUB HOLDS TRYOUTS
FOR MEMBERSHIP TOMORROW.
Preliminary tryouts for. membership
in the Comedy club and for the parts
'n the play for next year will be held
Wednesday afternoon at 4:0 o'clock in
the Cercle Francais rooms. The try-
outs will be expected to give a reading
of their own, or a reading that will be
assigned at that time.
A second and final trial for those
surviving on Wednesday will be held
some time next week, and the tryouts
will be assigned parts in some play.
for recitation at the later date.
BLUX'S FUTURIST PAINTINGS
TO BE EXHIBITED WEDNESDAY
Impressionistic and futuristic paint-
ings by Blum will be on exhibition in
,Memorial Alumni hall beginning to-
morrow. This collection has attracted
a great deal of attention wherever dis-
played. 'The exhibit is given under the
auspices of the Ann Arbor Art associ-

In accordance with the recent rul-
ing passed by the Senate council and
the committee on non-athletic organ-
izations, the interfraternity confer-
ence has taken up the question 01
stricter rules regarding rushing and
the pledging of freshmen.
While the rules are not accepted as
yet, it is expected that they will be
ratified at a meeting of the confer-
ence to be held in the near future
They provide that no fraternity shall
pledge any freshmen until the firsi
Friday in May, and that no engage-
ment shall be made by any fraternity
or member with any freshmen before
the Wednesday preceding the first
Friday in May.
A judicial committee for the pur-
pose of enforcing the provisions o
the rules is provided for,and they may
punish a fraternity for infraction by
publication of the offense, by allow-
ing no rushing dates, or by not allow-
ing the fraternity to pledge or initiate
a man for the period of one year.
The rules also provide for the al-
lotment of four dates during the scho-
lastic year previous to the first Fri-
day in May when freshmen may be
entertained at the fraternity house,
and that they may not be entertained
at any other time except on the dates
allotted. For the purposes of the
rules, a freshman is considered as a
person not having a year's residence
at this or any other college or uni-
versity.
(Continued on page 6.)
NAMES NEW BOAT
CLUB COMMITTEE
Ensign Parsons Picks Men Who Are
to Serve on Membership
Campaign.
REGATTA TO BE HELD SATURDAY
Third Ensign H. S. Parsons, '15E,
of the Michigan Union Boat club has
announced the personnel of the mem-
bershi, committee, which will have
charge of the solicitation of members
for the organization. The members
will meet at the Union this afternoon
at 5:00 o'clock, and the plans of the
campaign will be announced to them
at that time.
Plans for the regatta to be held Sat-
urday morning are rapidly material-
izing. The rain yesterday held back
the work of constructing the portages
around the old pulp mill and the new
'Barton dam, but it is expected that
'this will go forward this morning. The
tent for the use of the contestants has
been secured and the list of prizes is
nearly completed.
The members of the membership
committee are: C. S. Bloomschield,
'16E, J. H. Fee, '16, H. M. Corey, '16,
P. C. Wagner, '16, W. V. Candler, '15E,
A. R. Grisses, '15E, H. C. Gault, '15, C.
H. Lang, '15, 0. M. Hall, '15E, E. J.
Roller, '15L, D. Dudley, '14E, T. G.'
Abrams, '15E, H. E. Waldron, '15E, F.
0. Warford, '13E, G. C. Caron, '14, P.
D. Koontz, '14, R. H. Neilson, '14,XA. I.
Rowe, '16, H. C. Kreager, '15E, and R.
M. McKean, '16. -

Ragtime, Specialties and Stunts
Mark Final Function of Year
For Combined Musical
Clubs.

*

to

New Councilmen to Be Sworn in
Tonight
-0-

1914 *
* H. Beach Carpenter, Paul Blan- *j
shard, Waldo Fellows. *
* 1914L. *
* J. Blakey Helm. *
* 1914D. *
* F. C. Daniels, C. W. Farley. *
* 1914H. *
G. G. Alway. *
1914P.
S. S. Scott. *I
* 1915 *
* Harry Gault, Harold Tait. *
1915E. *
A. T. Rickets, K. S. Baxter. *
* 1915L. *
* J. S. Books, Harry Muller. *
k (possibly only one first year law *
will be sworn in.) *
* * ** * * * * *
The last student council meeting of
:he year for the old men and the first
>ne for the newly elected councilmen
will be held tonight at 7:00 o'clock in,
the oratorical room. All the new men'
ire expected to be present and must
bring with them an election certificate
signed by the president and secretary
(Continued on page 4.)

HARMONY-EXPERTS PERFORM
TOMORROW NIGHT IN U. HALL
Admission Price Set at 2 Cents;
Tickets For Wind-Up Affair
Have Ready Sale.
Quartet work will be featured at the
combined concert of the University of
Michigan Glee and Mandolin club and
the Girl's Glee club, to be held tomor-
row evening in University Hall. The'
Varsity quartet is on the program
with a number of new selections, while
the Midnight Sons' group, which spe-
cializes on the vaudeville type of har-
mony, will be given enough time tc
warrant the title of popular concert
for the event.
No serious or ultra- classical num-
bers will be placed on the program.
Ragtime and novelties will hold sway,,
and many of the features in "Contrarie'
Mary" will be reproduced by the same
men who gave the stunts originally.
As this will be the last chance for
the campus to hear the melody-experts
before the close of the season, it is
expected that the attendance tomorrow
will set.a new record. .
Tickets may be obtained at State
street stores, .or at the box office in
University hall immediately before the
concert. The price of admission has
been placed at 25 cents.
TEN JUNIOR LAWS CHOSEN
BY BARRISTER'S SOCIETY.
Ten members of the junior law class
were yesterday initiated into the Bar-
rister society. The men chosen were:
Russel E. Baer, Grover C. Grismore,
Louis P. Haller, John B. Helm, Ed-
ward G. Kemp, Frank W. Murphy,
James C. Musser, John R. Ober, Miller
H. Pontius, and Creger B. Quaintance.
The initiation was held in the court
room of the law building after which
a picture of the society was taken on
the steps of the law building.
The initiation banquet was held im-
mediately after the ceremonies in
Mack's tea room. William Mills was
toastmaster and the following spoke:
Dean H. M. Bates, Prof. Evans Hol-
brook and Prof. R. E. Bunker repre-
senting the honorary members;'Dion
Birney, the old members; and Edward
G. Kemp, the incoming men.
Recital of "Maud" to be Give"Tonight.
Tennyson's "Maud" will be the sub-
ject of a recital by Prof. Hollister's
class in interpretative reading this ev-
ening at 8:00 o'clock in room 302 'N.
W. The public is invited.

of selling liquor to James Minzey, '16,
last Tuesday evening, was bound over
to the October term of circuit cerĀ«:t
under bond of $200 by Justice Doty
after hearing the evidence submitted
by Prosecutor George Burke at tlge
preliminary hearing yesterday after-
noon.
James H.Minzey,the complaining wit-
ness, testified that he had bought two
glases of beer in Damm's place Tues-
day evening, and had also purchased
one glass for a friend. Cross-exam-
ined by John P. Kirk, attorney for the
defense, Minzey refused to admit that
he had made complaint against the
saloonkeeper at the instigation of any
one; but asserted that the warrant
was issued at his request, and he act-
ed voluntarily in filing a complaint
against Damm. Attorney Kirk tried
to establish a motive for Minzey's com-
plaint, but the witness declared that
he had not been coerced by either the
university authorities or members of
the license committee of the city coun-
cil.
Minzey admitted that he had been
summoned to the office of President
Hutchins Tuesday to explain to uni-
versity officials a difficulty in which
he was involved, the nature of which
he refused to state in court; and in the
conversation he had had with the uni-
versity officials, he stated that the pues-
tion of students buying liquor was
discussed. He admitted that he had
been cautioned by the officials to stay'
away from the saloons. Attorney Kirk
asked him why he did not heed the ad-
vice, since that very evening he had
gone into Damm's saloon and bought
liquor.
"I was suffering under a nervous
strain and I thought that the drink
would do me good," replied Minzey.
On Wednesday morning at 9:00
o'clock, according to further testimo-
ny, Minzey had another appointment
with Pres. Hutchins, and named places
where he had been buying liquor.Then
on his own free will he went down to
Justice Doty's office and filed a com-
plaint.
No other witnesses were called for
the prosecution, and Attorney Kirk
stated that his client would offer no
evidence.
Prosecutor George Burke stated last,
night that he did not have a list of
students who were known to frequent
saloons.
"I will not call upon students to
testify in the case against Lawrence
Damm beyond the witnesses I have
already listed. I can state that none
of them are students not directly con-
cerned with this case. I am not in fa-
vor of a 'spotter system,"and I Would
refuse to consider evidence offered by
informers or spies," he declared.
TEN TJUNIOR ENGINEERS
ATHiEREn IN BY VCLCANS
Nothing daunted by the ravages of
the elements, Vulcans, the senior en-
gineering honorary society, sallied
forth yesterday afternoon as the cam-
pus clock tolled the hour of five and
gathered into their fold ten from
among the members of the junior
class.
After the usual ceremonies around
the anvil on the green east of the
library, the quaintly garbed sons of
the forge, adjourned to the Union
where a feast was prepared.
he following men were initiated in-
to the mysteries of boilermaking, M.
H1. Boyle, G. C. Patterson, S. F. Brush,
C. A. Crowe, R. Braun, A. O. Williams,
W. J. Thienes, S. B. Douglas, W. Cook,
and E. P. McQueen.

Tomorrow Night University Hall
Big Popular Concert
GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUB
GIRLS' GLEE CLUB
A Quarter Admits Ticket Sale At Door

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan