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May 24, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

[E WEATHER MAN
For Ann Arbor:
lay-Fair and warmer.

Th~

i.
Ml lgari

y

ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

No. 16S.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 24, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ET LIKELY

MANY ENTER FIRST ANNUAL
UNION BOAT CLUB REGATTA.

TO DESTROY
OLD RECORDS
ass, of University High, Chicago,
Starts by Pole Vaulting
Over 12 Ft., Breaking
Two Records.
AND RAPIDS LEADS WITH
LEWIS INSTITUTE SECOND

Tent For Use of Contestants
Diving Raft Will Be Pit
Up1 This Week.

and I

2:30 A I Finals and
Finals Will Be
Started.

Semi-

*_ * * *

* * *

Grand Rapids Central.....
Lewis Institute, Chicago ....
Muskegon..............
Grand Rapids Central.....
University High, Chicago ....
Ann Arbor. . . ..
Richmond...............
New Trier High, Kenilworth..
Chelsea................
Wayne......... .
Adrian..................
Bay City................
Croswell ................
Detroit Eatern ..........
* * * * * * * *

14 *
11 *
9*
7*
5*
5*
4*
4*
3 *
2*
2*
2*
1*
* *

Although the entries for the regatta
to be held by the Michigan Union boat
club are coming in rapidly, the officials
in charge of the event are anxious that
everyone who intends to enter in any
of the contests do so at once, so that
preparations can be made for taking
cre of them.I
A tent for the use of the contestants
will be put up near the power house,
and a large diving raft will be con-
structed. The plans for the building
of portages at the pulp mill and the
Barton dam are well under way, and
the actual labor will be commenced
the firstof the week.
Nothing definite has been heard
from the Detroit Boat club in reply to
the request for the use of the two
single racing shells for the affair, but
it is expected that no difficulty will be
encountered. The oarsmen who have
promised to row in the race have been
practicing on the river with rowboats,
and several of the swimmers have been
taking exercise',n the lake above the
dam, in preparation for the contests.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
ELECTS, OFFICERS
Irene Bigalke, 14, Elected President;
Louise Conklin, '13, Withdraws
From Race,

ANNUAL CAP
NIGHT RITES
ARE SUCCESS
Many Thousands Watch 1916 Men
Attain Tfheir Second Year
Rights Last
Night.
WAYS OF BOOSTING MICHIGAN
TOld BY VARIOUS SPEAKERS^

It. Hulbert, '14-1 Acted, as Master
Ceremonies, and Floyd Otis,
'13M, Led the Yells,

of

The opening afternoon of the Fif-
enth -Annual Interscholastic started
f with a promise that insures a rec-
d making meet and points to one of
e most successful high school con-

CLASS TEAMS.
PLAY OVERTIME
DRAW CONTEST
Junior Laws and Soph Enginevr Play
14 Innings in 6--o T e
Game For Camnpus
(hampionship.
ERRORS COSTLY FOR LA WS,
WHILE BOTH TEAMS BAT hARD

that Michigan has ever enter- NEARLY 500 VOTES ARE CAST.

Championship Will Probably
cided Some Time
Next Week.

UION

THESPIANS LEAVE
FOR CHICAGO LAST NIGHT.

Be De.

ed. Stars galore cavorted around
ry field and spent the afternoon in
fning out the weaker ones and mak-
ready for the final clash this af-
toon. With the fields events entire-
run off, two Illinois schools and
Michigan institutions led their riv-
by narrow margins, and making
ertain that some of the races to-
row will be the tightest ever seen
o far only one record has gone by
boards but the decease of that old
k was so spectacular that it made
meet a success in itself. Foss, of
versity High of Chicago, was the
. who appropriated the spot light
a stellar performance in the pole
t, breaking the Interscholastic
rd by nine inches, smashing the
*y field mark, and nailing down a
k that will stand for some time
. a clean vault of twelve feet, five
ts of an inch. The little climber
the event with eleven feet three
es tieing the mark set by Horner

ars ago. Then by
s of three inches,

successive.
he reached

opmost notch of the standards
h by actual measurement was the
* he set. By doing this he broke
held record held by Dvorack at
n feet eight inches. The fact that
was the only record tp go yester-
y no means insures that no more
>e broken. Judging by the marks
in the preliminaries it is safe to
hat it is entirely probable that
Id marks in the relay, hurdles,and
er, may find themselves in dan-
All of these records were ap-
hed in the trial heats but in the
rity of cases the contestants
d up and loafed across the line,
nt to qualify. But today will see
men extended to their limit and
time should result.
Chicago Schools Dangerous.
)m the showing of the first day it
as if the Michigan High schools
a danger of losing the state title.
rsity High of Chicago, Evans-
Academy, Toledo, and Lewis
ute showed some stuff that
them out in the first'
and Alpena has looked the best
(Continued on page 4.)

Irene Bigalke, '14, was elected pres-
ident of the Women's League at the
annual election held yesterday. Julia
Anderson was chosen vice-president,
Honora Fogerty, '15, treasurer;record-
ing secretary, Mary Lewis, '15; corres-
ponding secretary, Margaret Foote,'15;
chairman membership committee, Julia.
Henning, '14, social chairman Clara
Roe, '14; housekeeper, Judith Gins-
berg, '15. Nearly 500 votes were cast,
a large gain over last *year's vote.
These results were announced at the
close of the play "Pandora" at a gar-
den party which was given in place of
the formal installation of officers.
The eleventh hour withdrawal of
Louise Conklin, '13, split the vote
somewhat, Irene Bigalke winning easi-
ly. The large vote was due to an ef-
fort to organize the independents this
year. The fact that they elected five
members at large of the executive
board drew out a large vote. The re-
sults of the executive board were not
attainable last night as the votes had
not been counted. Nothing was done
about the appointment of the chair-
man of the new self-government board
as the executive board will not meet
until next Saturday when active work
will be started upon the matter.
SCHEDULE OF TENNIS TEAM
IN EAST MARRED BY RAINS.
Match With Bucknell Cancelled; Play-
ers Meet Pittsburgh Today if
Weather Permits.
PHILADELPHIA, May 23.-The
same rains that have been dogging the
footsteps of the Michign baseball
team in the east, have also marred the
schedule of tennis players, forcing
them to remain idle for two days.
The match with Penn on Thursday
was cancelled for this reason, and a
further disappointment was encoun-
tered today when rain stoppfed the con-
test with Bucknell.
Pittsburg is the next stop on the
itinerary of the racquet wielders, and
provided that the weather man will
give a respite from rain, they will hook!
up with the smokeaters today.I

In the fire-lit amphitheatre of Sleepy Battling until darkness enveloped
Hollow more than a thousand fresh- Ferry field baseball diamond, the jun-
men became sophomores last night in for laws and soph engineers were un-
the Cap Night celebration of 1913, able to settle the dispute for th, cam-
which successfully upheld the tradi- pus championship yesterday afternoon
tion as that of which Michigan may be and were forced to stop proceedings
proud. Many thousands of people with a 6 to 6 tie. The game was by
covered the hillsides to watch the 1916 far the most exciting contest of the
men attain their second year rights interclass series and the larg , rowd
and the black robed seniors filed sol- displayed a goodly amount of enthu-
emnly into "the wide wide world." siasm.
The procession from the campus The laws started the scoring in the
began at about 7:45 o'clock, headed first inning when Hippler snigled and
by the seniors along the usual route crossed later by a clean bingo by
marked by red torches, and then into "King" Lehr. The scoring then stopped
the circle of the big bonfire. The until the third round when the eugi-
crowd was especially large on account neers got acquainted with th= offer-
of the presence of the interscholastic ings of Spencer and tallied live times
visitors, although they found the big pitcher for
The program began with yells led only three hits, but he gave one free
by Floyd Otis, 13M, who presided on ticket and his teammates soared up in
the soap box platform. Harold Hul- the ethereal regions for a brief so-
bert '14M was master of ceremonies journ.
and the first speaker was Burke Shar- However, the lawyers came back to
tel, '13L, who discussed "The Confer- earth the next inning and remained
ence." "Let's wake up," said Shartel, there the rest of the game and their
"so that the control of Michigan ath- opponents were able to count only
letics will be put back in Ann Arbor once after the fateful third. li the
where it ought to be." He said that fourth the juniors took two healthy
conditions when Michigan left the swings at the ball for as many safeties
Western Conference have ,ceased to and added three to their account, mak-
exist and that the failure of Michigan ing the score four and five.
to return hitherto has been on account Nothing more was doing in the scor-
of forces from without which have ing line until the eighth when. Caswell,
governed the policy of the board. the first man ,up singled and then
As the second speaker Prof. G. W. scored on Haddon's three bagger to
Patterson of the engineering depart- right center.
ment talked on "Other Michigan Tra- The junior laws came to bat in the
ditions". He advocated dormitories ninth and by a timely rally tied the
for Michigan, saying, "I hope to see score. Hippler was the first batsman
the day when you will have dormitor- to face Haddon, who had. fanned the
ies as you ought to have." "Looking three batsmen in the preceding inning,
Forward" was the subject of a talk and his hot grounder was fumbled by
by W. C. Trible '13 who explained to Budd covering the third sack giving
the 1916 class some of its newly ac- him a life. After Dobson had missed
quired duties. "Things that you do three wide ones Lehr came to the plate
must always have Michigan in them," and registered his third hit of the
he said. . , , game. It was a wicked grounder that
Prof. David Friday spoke ton "Things bounced off the chins of Budd allow-
We Expect of a Sophomore." "There ing Lehr to make second but Hippler
are two things," he explained, "for was held at third. Witherow then ti-
which every man must stand, these ed the score by placing a clean two
are efficiency and ideals-efficiency in sacker along the left field foul line
>ne's work and ideals in everything." letting Hippler and Lehr saunter
J. H. VanAuken '13L was the last across the rubber for the tieing score.
speaker talking of the "Michigan Un- After the engineers failed to score
on." He told the new sophomores Umpire Lavans called the game on ac-{
their duty toward the Union and some count of darkness The championshipI
>f the ways they can better it. He will probably be decided some time
said, "Activity in the Union is duty next week but the date has not as yet
h- cben set

'
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Sudden Death of Cyril Quinn's Fathe
Casts Gloom Over Departure
of Troupe.
With 105 of Michigan's amateur thes
pians on board, the "Contrarie Mary
special pulled out of the Michigan Cen
tral station for Chicago last night a
11:15 o'clock. There was but on
thing to cast a shade of sadness ove
the party. Cyril Quinn, '14, assistan
to the general chairman, was unableti
go along owing to the sudden death o
his father in New York city yesterday
afternoon.
Thetrain will arrive in Chicago abou
7:30 o'clock this morning and aftei
a final rehearsal the men will be en-
tertained by the Alumni associatio
until the evening show starts. Many
arrangements have been made and to-
day i expected to be a gala day fo
Michigan men in Chicago and the im-
mediate vicinity. The headquarters
will probably be at the University club
the privileges of which are granted tc
the Ann Arbor delegation for the day.
The presentation occurs at the Black-
stone theatre and a large attendance
is promised.
CHARITYWOKR
TO HEAR NOTABLES
. o* . N. Ferris, President-Emeritus
James B. Angell and Pres. H. 1.
Hutchins to Speak.
CONFERENCE OPENS MONDAY..
Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris
President-emeritus James B. Angell
and President Harry B. Hutchins, wil
address .the opening assembly of the
Fir.st State Conference of Charities
and Corrections Monday evening a
x:00 o'clock in Sarah Caswell Angel
hail. The conference is arranged un-
der the auspices of the Ann Arbo
chapter of the Federation of Charitie
and Corrections, and will take plaec
from Tuesday morning to Thursda
evening, in Barbour gym.
All branches of social service, suck
as probation officers' work, housing.
recreation, confinement, and prison re-
form questions will be discussed dur-
ing the regular sessions. The meeting
will be open to the public and -no col-
lection or admission fee will be charg-
ed. Students of law, medicine, and so-
ciology are especially invited to attend
all the meetings and may raise ques-
tions at the end of the sessions.
Many men experienced in charity
work are scheduled to speak at the
regular sessions of the conference.
Mayor McKenzie of this city, President
Frank Allmendinger of the local Civic
association, general secretary Alex-
ander Johnson of the National Feder-
ation of Charities and Corrections, Mr.
Timothy Shea head probation officer o
Syracuse, N.Y., Dean V.C. Vaughan, Dr.
Alfred S. Warthin of the medical fac-
ulty and Prof. C. H. Cooley of the so-
ciology department are among the
speakers at the various sessions.
Seniors Slow in Paying Diploma Fees.
Only one-fourth of the more than
1,000 seniors who expect to get degrees
this June have so far paid their diploma
fees. The fee of $10, and the teachers
fee of $2.00 must be paid before Satur-
day noon, May 31, if a degree is to be
>btained at the coming commencement.
Proper cards, should be filled out at
the office of the secretary or registrar
f the different departments before
payment is made to the treasurer.

which everyone of you owe and please
don't shirk it."
Following the program the classes
sang "Where Oh Where Are the Ver-
dant Freshmen?" and then "The Yel-
low and the Blue." The freshmen per-
formed their last rites in a spiral pro-
cession about the enlarged fire and
tossed their little signs of bondage
into the flames. They then hurried
away to rush the Majestic for the
promised "free show" and the crowd
filed out of Sleepy Hollow, another
Cap Night successfully enacted.
'Visiting Athletes to Dance at Union.
The regular Michigan Union dance
tonight will be open to prep school
athletes and their lady friends as well
as to members of the Union. Tickets
for the function are limited to 75
couples.

The score:
(Continued

PREP ATHLETES
TO SEE TRACK
MEN IN ACTION
Farrell Will Bring Out Fntire Track
Squad, This Morning, in Test
to Pick Men For
Eastern Meet.
TEAM IN GOOD CONDITION;
HIIBAUGH MISSED SORELY
Juniors Seem to Have Best Chances
of Winning; Seniors Victims
of Jinx.
As a part of the entertainment offer-
ed to the visiting "prep" school ath-
letes, Trainer Farrell will parade the
full strength of the university track
team on Ferry field this morning at
10:00 o'clock, to take part in the Var-
sity meet. Not only will this inter-
class contest give the visitors a chance
to see stars of the Maize and Blue in
action, but it will serve as a try out
for the inter-collegiates next Friday
and Saturday.
While Trainer Farrell is sure of most
of the men who will be carried to the
intercollegiates, today's meet will de-
cide the chances of those who have
not up to date made marks that would
warrant them being taken to the East.
It is not certain whether Haff will be
run in the quarter or the half mile, as
the trainer has not yet decided just
where he can perform the best. Ear-
lier in the season there was some talk
of running Haff in the 220, but his
weak tendon would prevent that now.
In other respects the track team will
be in good condition if no accidents,
such as the injury to Haimbaugh, fur.
ther weaken its make up.
The juniors seem to have the best
chance of winning the 'meet, but were
also touted to win the indoor varsity,
where they were nosed out of the vic-
tory by the seniors. The near grads will
,have small chance of repeating this
however with H.aimbaugh out of the
running and Haff able to run in only
one event. But whatever the outcome
the guests of the occasion will have
the opportunity to see some of the best
track and field athletes in the college
world in action.

on page 4.)

MANY FEATURES PLANNED FOR
PALMER FIELD GAMES TODAY
Women to Hold Basket Supper on Hill
Slope After Contests; Dane'
Will Follow.
All women attending the annual
field games at Palmer Field today are
urged to bring their lunches and join
in the basket supper to be held on the
slope of the hill at 6:30 o'clock. Re-
freshments will be for sale.
The sports begin at 1:30 o'clock with
theF.semi-finals of the tennis matches.
Following these, the hockey games
are to be played, four interelass teams
competing. The tennis finals will
then be played off, and archery con-
tests will be held later in the after-
noon.
Following the supper, the dancing
will begin. Senior women numbering
75 will parade about the field in caps
and gowns, forming the black "M"
and their class numerals. The fresh-
men will feature-a shepherd dance, the
juniors the Reign outdoor dance, and
the sophomores, will give the usual
May pole dance, three poles being used
at the same time
-Officers of the Aero society for
next year were elected last night as
follows: president, F. E. Loudy, '15E;
vice-president, P. H. Evans, '14E; sec-
retary and treasurer, L. E. Delf,.'15E;
experimenting manager, L. C. Wilcox-
en, '16E.


t'
,.
, ,,
.'

3Iasolk Lyons, '16, Awarded Loving Cup
Mason Lyons,'16,was awarded a lov-
ing cup in the diving contest held at
the Majestic last night. There were
five contestants, and the winner was
chosen by the audience. Another con-
test will be held tonight, and two cups
will be given. The event will be open
to all who desire to compete.
GRADUATE NURSE TO GO TO
MISSION AT BUSRA , ARABIA
Miss Minnie Holzhauser, '13, who
has just finished three years of train-
ing at the homeopathic hospital, will
begin her trip to Busrah, Arabia, next
week. She will work in a hospital

q-

there under the direction of Dr. Ben-
nett, '04M. She will go to New York
next week and from there she will sail
to London and spend three months
studying tropical diseases after which
she will continue her trip to Busrah.

I , :

Year Book

SALE OF

-a

for

1913

MICHIGANENSIA N
CONTINUES ALL DAY

Seniors,,

Interscholastic Men
Take one Home
for
Yourself and High
School

Sophomores,

THE LITTLE WHITE TENTS AT
LAW WALK

FLAG POLE

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