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October 02, 1912 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION PROGRAM.

__

FEBRVJ-
OF -RA-
NT1895

ated in Contest With
in Which Mich-
n Lost.
bie' Oratorical associ-
man who has already
mettle to the satis-
:an men, for it is re-
95 Herbert S. Hadley
orthwestern men had
i brilliance to defeat
ing team. That this
has not been stifled
his present political
that he received his
ree, Governor Hadley
ajority of his time in
As Prosecuting Attor-

ITIM UIIUf'llU 1IL.UUHU
IS UNPARALLELED.
University Boasts Long List of Victo-
ries in Various Oratorical
Contests.
HAS WON 28 OF 40 DEBATES
Of the twenty-one contests in the
Northern Oratorical League, nine have
been victories for Michigan, more.than
twice as many honors as the nearest
of her six competitors. Six of these
contests were won in succession.
Of the peace contests, three of the
five State Contests have been victories
for Michigan, one Interstate, and in
May, 1912, the National Contest, in
which more than eighty colleges took
part.
The university has won twenty-eight
of its forty debates; four of the five
with Wisconsin, three of the four with
Minnesota, three of the four with Penn-
sylvania, eight of the twelve with
Northwestern, and ten of the fifteen
with Chicago. Eleven debates were
won in succession. Only one debate
has been lost by unanimous decision;
nineteen have been won by unanimous
vbte, a record unexcelled among large
universities..
In order to sustain this unparalleled
record, students must, first, support
the Oratorical association which main-
tains these contests, and, second, take
part in the debates and oratorical con-
tests through which the 'varsity men
are selected. You owe it to yourself
to develop your powers as a speaker;
you owe it to Michigan to uphold her
proud record.

1.. Katherin Oliver McCoy ....................................0ctober 15.
Recital-"Bunty Pulls the Strings"
2. Professor Thomas C. Trueblood.........................November 14
Recital-"Julius Caesar"
3. Governor Herbert S. Hadley
4. Peace Oratorical Contest..........................December 19
5. Chicago-Michigan Debate ..................................January 17
Subject: Banking Reform
6... Honorable Edwin D. Mead
7. Association Play. . ................................March 7
"The Fan," by Goldoni
8. University Oratorical Contest .........................March 21
9. Cup Debate........ ........................................May 9

For
BIB

ensie Contest Will Be Waged On
Proposed Plan of Bank-
ing Reform.
LIOGRAPHY IS PREPARED.

UPI

i

CHICAGO-MICHIGAN
DEBATE JANUARY 17

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION.

The announcement that the Students' Lecture Association had disbanded
caused such general disappointment that the University- Oratorical Associa-
tion has decided to extend its list of entertainments and, add a short program
of lectures and readings.
In offering this course the association hopes to give continuity to the
custom of each year bringing to Ann Arbor, distinguished public men, who
are held up as examples of the speaker's are in addition to presenting its own
best student talent and that of other universities who meet us in contest.
In so doing, the purpose of the organization,-to foster and develop a strong
interest in oratory among the students of the university, has not been lost
sight of, and the Association congratulates itself in being able to offer the
following numbers for its twenty-second annual program.

I

SCHEDULE OF CONTESTS.

WILL PRESENT "JULIUS CAESAR."
Professor T..C. Trueblood Will Read
Shakespearian Drama.
Professor T. C. Trueblood will pre-
sent for the association this year
Shakespeare's great oratorical play
"Julius Caesar." Those who have
heard Professor Trueblood in his artis-
tic presentation of "Hamlet," "Mac-
beth," "Ingomar, the Barbarian," and
in his numerous miscellaneous recitals
will not miss this opportunity of hear-
ing him again. Extended comment is
not necessary, for Professor Trueblood
is very well known to Michigan audi-
ences. He has read with flattering suc-
cess before general and college audi-
ences all over this country and in for-
eign lands, and while he has always
charmed his general hearers, he has
not failed to satisfy the most critical
audiences everywhere. Shakespeare
is always interesting when interpreted
by a good reader, and this is a fine op-
portu'nity to hear a great play so in-
terpreted.
The association presents here the
only opportunity to hear Prof. True-
blood this year.
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION TO
PLAY GOLDONI'S "THE FAN"
Comedy by the Author of "A Curious
Mishap" Will Be Presented
March 7.

NUll

TO SPEAK ON PEACE MOVEMENT

I

11

The Hon. Edwin D. Mead Obtained to
Deliver Address at Michigan.

The annual debate wih the Univer-
sity of Chicago occurs January 17.
These contests have always aroused
the .keenest interest among students,I
second only to former athletic con-
tests with that institution. Since the
"late unpleasantness" with the confer-
ence this is the only contest left in
which these old rivals are permitted
to take part. There is always the
keenest rivalry and the hardest kind
of forensic contest. The subject this
year is a very practical one: "Resolv-
ed, that the plan of banking reform
proposed by the Nationoal Monetary
Commission should be adopted by
Congress." An extended bibliography
of the subject has been prepared, and
also a schedule of the contests, which
may be had at the oratory room, 302
N. W., University hall.
Those who wish to enter the contests
must join either the Alpha Nu or the
Adelphi society of the literary depart-
ment, or the Jeffersonian or the Web-
ster society of the law department.
They must be prepared to speak in
the& society preliminaries by Nov. 8.
Each society will select a team and
contest in the inter-department debat-
es from which two teams will be se-
lected, one to debate with the Uni-'
versity of Chicago here and the other
with Northwestern University the
same night at Evanston. All who have
ability as debaters should come out
for the teams and give Michigan the
strongest trios she has ever had on the
platform. The debate with Chicago
is one of the regular course offered by
the Oratorical association.

Regarded by Many as
terpreter of Scot
ature and Ch

KATHERINE 0
SCHEDULUD
"BUNTY PUL
FOR THE FI]
FAMED ON P

I

Author, orator, secretary of the
World's Peace Foundation, Dr. Mead

l

I

was for twelve years editor of the New

rI

I

England Magazine, was unceasing in
his advocacy of civil reforms, was for
several years president of the Good
Citizenship Society, and also of the
Twentieth Century Club of Boston,
has four times been delegate of the
American Peace Society to Interna-
tional Peace Congresses, is author of
several books on the philosophy of Lu-
ther, Carlyle, and Emerson, and is con-
sidered withal one of the most attract-
ive platform orators before the public.
He will lecture on some phase of world
peace.

Katherine Oliver McCoy in
ing of the popular Scotch
"Bunty Pulls the Strings," wil
first number on the progran
Oratorical association on Octo
Katherine Oliver interprets
trays character, not only wi
derful understanding, but wit
tistic touch that is marvelous
is known wherever the lyre
Scottish literature is known.
ands regard her as the greate
preter of Scottish literature.
She has entertained at th
House, in Washington, the
ment House in Canada, and
most splendid halls and home
continents. She once gave1
interpretation of "The Little 1
before the author, James Bari
home in London. She had re
Sky Pilot" to Ralph Connor
said, "I am glad my childre
your hands."
The Oratorical association
to offer its members and fr
opportunity to hear Katherin
Her appreciation of a very
play, "Bunty Pulls the Strings
excelled, and she knows hov
so that others can appreciate
joy this play.
Pres. DeVore of Glendale
says, "The picturesque dre
changing scenery are not need
Katherine Oliver places befor
agination, through her rare
tion and charming Scottish di
strongly contrasted charact
homely scenes of how 'Bunty
Strings.'"

0. A

First Semester
1. Peace Contest, Dec. 19.
Preliminaries, Dec. 10-12.
2. Central League Debates, Jan. 17.
Society Preliminaries, Nov. 8-9.
Interdepartment debates, Nov. 25-
27.

I -

Instructor Works on Survey.

TECHNIC MAY BE REQUIRED
AS ENGINEER TEXT-BOOK

.

3.

Second Semester
Northern Oratorical Contest, May

p

Providing a satisfactory arrange-
ment can be made with the English

Mr. W. F. Hunt who has been an in-
structor in the mineralogy department
for a number of years, spent the sum-
mer in connection with the Geological
Survey at Washington, D. C. He re-
turns to Michigan this year as an as-
sistant professor.

ey General he
tive campaign
ice evils. His
st the abuses
lie Harvester
ce Trust, has
ion of the hon-
Bused the fear
after. Tender-
iaton for Gov-
rateful people
in of his public
% 15,000 major-
r Hadley to an
be association
onding to the
desire to hear
That the Gov-
)rce in politics
e last Republi-
gh floor leader
his past rec-
Ily the only
acceptable to
eaker, Govern-
vigor, grace,
n necessary to
me. The Ora-
as itself fortu-
of such native
Oil Paintings'
a the old engi-
een decorated
intings, which
pering gallery

2.
Class Contests, Feb. 18-25.
University Contest, March 21.
4. Cup Debate, May 3.-
Preliminaries, March 29.
Inter-Society Debates, April 18-19.
SEASON TICKETS FOR SALE
BY STUDENTS AND AT WARR'S
The price of the tickets for the en-
tire course of nine numbers is one
dollar. This price is to everybody,
whether a member of the university or
not. In case of the students and fac-
ulty of the University, the tickets car-
ry with them membership in the Ora-
torical association including all dues.
Tickets may be had at Wahr's book
store at any time, or from student sel-
lers. Anyone desiring to sell tickets
on commission should communicate
with Ralph M. Snyder at once, phone
854-J.
NEW COURSES ARE OFFERED
TO ENGINEERING STUDENTS.

department of the university, whereby
the Michigan Technic will be used as
one of the required text-books of the
freshman engineer English classes,
this magazjne will be issued as a
monthly publication with the October
number.
Business Manager Edward T. La-
zear, representing the Technic, and a
┬░ommittee appointed by Professor F.
N. Scott of the rhetoric department,
will meet this week to discuss the mat-
ter, and draw up plans to present to
the Board of Regents at their next
meeting.

Tile members and friends of the Ora-
torical association have come to look
forward with keen anticipation of
pleasure to the annual play. Last year
the association presented John Tobin's.
comedy, "The Honeymoon," and it was
pronounced the best amateur play
seen at Michigan in a long time. On
March 7, the association expects 'to
present Goldoni's comedy, "The Fan."
Many Ann Arbor people will remember
a delightful play, "A Curious Mishap,"
by the same author, which was played
by the Donald Robertson Players some
time ago. "The Fan" is about as good
a ,play as "A Curious Mishap." It is
clean comedy full of interesting situ-
ations. The mere fact that Goldoni,
whom Browning called "The King of
Comedy," is the author, is enough to
commend this play. While a still bet-
ter play may be selected, the usual
high grade performance is assured.
Those who take the parts in the play
are selected from the best talent
among the association members, es-
pecially those who have shown marked
success in the classes in Shakespear-
ean and' dramatic reading. The cast
is carefully trained by the department
of oratory. Through the annual play
the association not only gives its mem-
bers an opportunity to enjoy a good
play, but also encourages the study of
dramatic literature from the acting
point of view.

M.

Geology Course 7 Will Not be Give'

Another new course,. that of muni-
cipal surveying, has been announced
in the engineering department. The
new course will be given by Prof.
Clarence Johnston. It will be used in
connection with a course in sanitary
engineering to be given by Prof. W.
C. Head, who for a number of years
was one of the most prominent men
on the faculty of the University of
Kansas, and who has been recently se-
cured by the Regents of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Prof. Johnston will
also give two new courses in forestry.
One is a course of topographical draw-
ing and mapping, and the other is a
course in field topography, designed
especially for the forestry students-

I

Attention is called to the fact that
course 7 in geology will not be given
this year. Through some mistake, the
course appears in the literary an-
nouncement in connection with other
work offered by the geology depart-
ment. It should have been omitted
entirely, as Professor Hobbs, who is
on a leave of absence, Will not be here
this year.
Dean Cooley Attends Big Conference.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley left Ann
Arbor last night for Indianapolis, Ind.,!
where he will attend the fourth Na-
tional Conservation Congress which
'will be held in that city from October
first to the fourth. Dean Cooley ex-
pects to be back. in Ann Arbor the
end of this week.

i
>''
1
3
4

} ,:

BILL FOLDS, CARD CASES, WA
PURSES, BRIEF CASES, El
NAME EMBOSSED IN GOLD
ON LEATHER GOODS FREE OF CHARGE

Loose Leaf Note B(

I

CARD INDICES and FILING DEVICEN
OF ALL RINDS

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION

Waterman's Ideal

Fountain

AT'

Miss Burnham Goes to Library School

Miss Adele Burnham who had charge
of the reference desk in the library
last year, is now attending the New
York State Library school at Albany.

II

Mayer, Schoettle & Schairer C
STATIONBRS PRINTERS BINDERS STUDENTS' SUPP
112 SOUTH MAIN STREET

1,

i

. I

|

.____ ___

, - ,

ing Number
Bunty

October

Pulls

the

Strings"

RECITAL BY

THERI

E

OLIVER
NINE NUMBERS

cC

ONE

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