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May 20, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,
x- '

nu Arbor:
settled, fitful gustsI

le

M~hig

Daily

ONLY MORNING PAPER IN

ANN ARBOR

east.

In

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY MAY 20, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

1I, No. 164.

A -

ST EASTERN

GAME IS WON-
BY BG SCORE
Mlichilgan Finds Nichols for 18 Hits
and Wins Big Swatfest From
Syracuse by Timely
Hitting.
1ARIBEAU PLTCHES AIRTIGHT
GAME YIELDING BUT 4 HITS.
fwo Teams Will Meet Tomorrow in
Final Contest of the
Season.
(Special to The Michigan Daily.)
SYRACUSE, N. Y., May 19.-Michi-
;an won the first game of her eastern,
rip here today in a swatfest that
wamped the Orangemen by the big-
est score of the year. The Wolver-
nes never once let up in their hitting
nd amassed a total of eighteen hits,,
vhich mixed with nine errors, netted
fteen tallies to Syracuse lone one.
Baribeau, who pitched for Michigan,
urled a beautiful game and held the
ome team to four bingles but errors
llowed them to score once and save
hemselves a shutout.The doctor pitch-
r was never in danger and with the
uge lead that his team mates gave
im, it wa's easy sailing for him. Syr-
cuse presented Nichols, the same
urler who is credited with a five to
ne victory over the Wolverines in
nn Arbor and who was counted on
>r a comeback. He had a comeback
ut it was rather on the reverse order
nd Michigan swatted his offerings to
11 corners of the lot. His team mates'
rrors kept him in continual hot wat-
r and the Wolverines steady hitting.
:mpleted the damage to his perfectly
ood reputation.

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Nominations for Women's
League Officials. Election,
Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Barbour gymnasium and gen-
eral library.
President-Louise Conklin,
Irene Bigalke, Isabelle Rizer;
Vice-President-Julia Anderson,
Dorothy Morain, Laura Leige;
Treasurer - Honora Fogerty,
Frances Green; Recording Sec-
retary - Beatrice Lambrecht,
Mary Lewis; Corresponding Sec-
retary-Margaret Foote, Marga-
ret Hoag, Grace Marquedant;
Membership Chairman-Julia
Henning, Katherine Wenley; So-
cial Chairman-Florence Hax-
ton, Clara Roe; Housekeeper-
Marguerite Denfeld, Judith
Ginsburg.
* * * * * * * * *

PREPARE FOR
BIG ATHLETIC
COMPETITION
Michigan's Track Athletes . Center
Their Attention on Eastern
Intercollegiate of
w May 30.
HAIMBAUGH'S INJURED ANKLE
MAY PREVENT HIS RUNNir

FOR OPERA ON
SALE AT UNION,
Offer Block of Best Seats For Chicago
Presentation of "Contrarie
Mary" Production
Today.
CHICAGO ALXI PLAN TO
CEE AT FP~ "MICHIGAN DAY"

* C

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Candidates for the 1913-14 board
.in control of publications.
Election, Thursday,, May 22,
to 5:00 r.-in-in University
hall corridors.

*

Carl EW.Eberbach, '12-'15M.
James E. Hancock, '13E.
Edward G. Kemp, '12-'14L.
Frank W. Murphy, '14L.
Rowland W. Fixel, '12-'14L.
Charles A. Crowe, '14E.
Edwin R. Thurston, '13-'15L.
Harold Abbott, '13.
* * * * * *~ * *

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SALE .OF YEAR

Varsity Meet Will Be Held
Saturdny as Training
Event.

This Iientire

Cast and Orchestra Will Hold
Two Rehearsals Before
Departure.

Chas. A. Rice is Hurt in Collision.
Chas. A. Rice,-'14 dent, suffered a
deep gash on the skull and severe
body bruises when his motorcycle
crashed into a street car at Ingalls
and South University Sunday night at
7:30 o'clock. Rice will probably re-
sume his studies by the latter part of
this week.
NOMINATIONS ARE
MADE FOR COUNCIL

Six Classes Choose Candidates
Election to Student
Body.

For

TO ELECT MEMBERS THIS WEEK.
Nominations for student council
candidates were made-by six classes at
meetings held yesterday: The elec-
tions will be held before the end of
the present week.
Junior lits nominated six men from

Sisler and Bell were the star slug-
gers of the Wolverines while Webber
caught a beautiful game. Syracuse
kept Nichols in during the entire game
despite his warm reception and will
probably send De Silva in tomorrow
in an attempt to even the count which
now stands two to one for the west-
erners. Michigan will probably use
Quaintance and Rickey has given it
out that Sisler will not start until the
Princeton game.
Results of today's game are:
R H E
Michigan.............15 18 5
Syracuse........ ...1 4 9
Batteries: for Michigan-Baribeau
and Webber; for Syracuse-Nichols,
Illes and Farber.
LEAGUE ELECTION RESULTS
TO BE ANNOUNCED AT PLAY

which number three will be chosen at
the election Wednesday at 4:00 p. m. in
the West Physics lecture room. The
candidates are H. B. Carpenter, Paul
Blanshard, Morris Milligan, Adna
Johnson, Waldo Fellows and Patrick
Koontz.
The soph lits, who elect council rep-
resentatives for the first time nomi-
nated Harry Gault, Chester Lang,
George Johnston, and Harold Tait. The
election will be held Wednesday at the
same place and hour.
Soph engineers nominated four men
from which number two will be chos-
en at the election to be held at 5:00
p. m. in room 311 new engineering
building. The men nominated were
A. T. Ricketts, J. T. Naylon, E. F.
Hughitt, and Kenneth Baxter.
Fresh laws nominated H. G. Neff, S.
M. Bookes, T. E. Agee, and H. W. Mul-
ler for council candidates. The elec-
tion will be held Thursday afternoon
from 4:00 to 5:00 o'clock in room B
(Continued on page 4.)

With the.Syracuse meet resulting in
a big Michigan victory. the attention
of the Varsity track athletes is now
centered on the Eastern Intercollegi-
ate of May 30, with the annual Varsi-
ty meet to be staged on the morning
of May 24 as an intermediate issue.
Heretofore the annual Varsity meet
has been staged before the regular
outdoor dual engagements between
Michigan and her rivals.This season,
however, it was found impossible to
hold the Varsity meet before the disas-
trous Cornell contest or before the
Syracuse meet. Therefore the Varsi-
ty competition will be held the Satur-
day before the Eastern Intercollegiate
meeting, and on the results of the meet
will be based in a large measure the
choice of men who will represent the
Wolverines in the annual contest
among the track men of the eastern
colleges to be held this year at Bos-
ton.
One feature of the meet with Syr-
acuse has lessened Michigan's chanc-
es of placing among the first four in
the intercollegiate. Haimbaugh, who
ran a plucky race in the mile run, and
who won his event easily, may not run
again for Michigan. After the race
Saturday, Haimbaugh was carried
from the field by his team-mates. At
first it was thought that the injury to
his bad ankle was. nothing more than
the natural irritation from running#
the event, but it now seems that thet
injury has been aggravated to sucht
an extent that it is doubtful if he can
run in the Varsity meet or perhaps
not in the Intercollegiate. Even if4
Haimbaugh does run in the eastern
meet, he will not be in his best form,
and therefore Michigan's chances are
lessened.
Considering the Varsity meet of Sat-
urday morning, it is not thought by
Michigan track supporters that Train-
er Farrell will let his men outdo them-
selves in any line of track endeavor.t
Farrell wants to have his men in thel
best shape possible for the Intercolle-
giate, and with that end in view, he
will use the Varsity meet only as at
training stunt, and to give the prep-
school athletes, who will be in Ann1
Arbor for the purpose of taking partt
in Michigan's Interscholastic, an op-c
portunity to see the Varsity men inc
action.f
"MOVIES" WILL SHOW FILMS
OF ANNUAL SPRING CONTESTS

Tickets for the presentation of "Con-
trarie Mary" at the Blackstone theater
:n Chicago on next Saturday, night
spay be purchased at the Union desk
today only. A block of 100 of the best
seats in the house, selling at 3:00, was
sent here and placed on sale. yester-
Cay morning. Twenty-one of the tick-
ets had been sold last night, and ,the
remainder will remain on sale until
tonight.
That the plans are to make the'pre-
sentation a first class event is evfdent
from the high priced house that is' be-
ing sold, the hest seats 'selling for
$3.00. It is understood that extenmive
plans are being made by the' Chicago
alumni association for the entertaii-
ment of the men who make the triip.
Automobiles will be provided to show
the men about the city. "Michigan
Day" in Chicago will be celebrated by
a large number of alumni as well? as?
some undergraduates. There has been
a demand for tickets by alumni in the
neighborhood of Chicago.
Two rehearsals of the entire cast
and orchestra will be held Wednes-
day night-at 7:00 o'clock at the Union,
and Thursday night at ':00 o'clock'
at the Whitney theater. The special
train of a baggage and three passenger
cars will leave Ann Arbor at 11:15
o'clock Friday night and arrive im Chi-
cago the next morning at 7:30, o'olock.
One rehearsal will probably be $held
there either in the morning or after-
noon. The return train willi leave as
soon after the show as possible. Gen-
eral chairman Philip Fletcher will post
a list at the Union tomorrow of the;
105 men who are to be taken.
FRESH MEDICS BEAT HOMEOPS.
Wrest One-Shied Game From Oppo-
nents by 16 to 3 Score.
In a featureless and one sided bat-
tle the fresh medics won from the
homeops yesterday afternoon by the
score'of 16 to 3. Thi3 puts the fresh
medics in the trio h t will fight for
the campus chainT: onship
The mediics started out; at a terrific
pace which they kept ip throughout
the entire game, connecting with the
offerings of Ideson the hoyneop's pitch-
er at all times. Galbraith working
for the medics 'pitched, a s:trong game
throughout and ┬░had his oppon.ents
guessing.
Wednesday the fresh m0dics will
line up against the soph eng ineers and
the winner of this contest will meet
the junior laws for the campus cham-
pionship Saturday morning.,

Committees in Each Department
Solicit Members For
Uni1on.

I w

INSTRUCTORS IN PHYSICS'
TO TAKE OTHER POSITIONS
Mr. F.J. Mellencamp, '93,Ph.D.'09,and
J. T. Littleton, who are instructors in
physics, will leave the university for
other positions at the end of.. the
school year. Mr. Mellencamp leaves
to take charge of the department of
physics at the Milwaukee State Nor-
mal School.
Mr. Littleton, who has held the po-
sition of physics instructor since 1911,
will take charge of the physical labo-
ratory of the Corning Glass Works,
Corning, N. Y.
TO CAMPAIGN FOR
LIFE MEMBERSHIPS

WILL APPROACH ALL SENIORS
The campaivn for life members. of
the Union among the seniors will be
started at once. The committee has
a list of every prospective graduate,
aid each man will be approached by
some committeeman representing his
department. Full life memberships
will be solicited. A full life member-
ship costs $50.00 while an- associate
life member pays five yearly install-
ments of $10.00 each at the end of
which tirhe he becomes a full life
member. The installment may be
started at any time.
The following seniors have been apt-
pointed to work in the various depart
ments. J. Austin Otto, general chair-.
man.
Literary department: John Towler,
chairman, Leland Bisbee, George Caul-
kins, Wendell Coler, Arend Bubee
Howard Ford, John P. Hanna, Ray
Johnson, Eben Lane,Isaac Lowenburg,
Karl Mohr, Claudius Pendill, and Carl
Schoeffel
Engineering' department: ' Arthur
(ontinued on page 3.)
MICHIGAN WINS IN TENNIS
Visiting Team Makes Clean Sweep of
Six Matches.

to

BOOK WILL NOT
START TODAY,
Owing to Delay at Hands of Binders,
Michiganensian Will Be
Distributed To-
morrow.
ENTIRE EDITION WILL BE
ON HAND WHEN SALE.OPENS
Annual Consists of Five Sections; is
Dedicated to Prof.
Smalley.
Because of the great labor involved
in binding the 1913 Michiganensian,
the largest book binding concern in
the country. has been unable to deliver
the copies on schedule time, and con-
sequently this year's annual. will not
go on sale until tomorrow noon. The
entire edition of 1,200 copies is now
bound. One third of these will arrive
by express from Chicago this morning,
but since, in past years, the first.hour's
sale has averaged 800 copies, the edi-
ors, have deemed it inadvisable to
open the sale until the whole edition
has arrived. The sale will be con-
ducted at two campus stands, one -at
the corner of State street and North
Univerity avenue, and another at the
qag pole.
A sample copy of the 1913 Michi-
;anensian was received yesterday by
the editors and in beauty, design and
binding It surpasses any previous an-
nual.sThe frontispiece"is antattract-'
Iye insert 'which announces' the 1913
Michiganensian in artistic gold .letter-
'ng. Above the announcement' is a
pebbled tip of University hall, printed
in three colors. Following, is a de-
sign, produced by duo-toned"plates,
announcing the arrangement and or-
der of the books, and a third leaf con-
tains the passage from the Ordinance
of 1787 inscribed on the arch of Uni-
versity Hall.
Volume Consists of Flv Books.
The annual is divided into five sec-
.ions, each one . relating to some par-
ticular phase of university activity.
Each book is introduced by a special-
"y designed insert in different colors
with a tinted double tone engraving.
Book I is entitled "The University"
and contains sixteen pages of half
tones in double ink. Book II, "The
Classes," is the distinctly senior sec-
tion and contains pictures of the va-
rious class officers and an individual'
picture of every senior in the univer-
'ity. hook III is devoted to "The Ath-.
'etics," and includes interesting ma-
aerial in regard to class, Varsity and
women's athletics. Book IV contains
'The Campus" with alP societies,clubs
and press organizations. The fifth
book is entitled "Organizations," and

Polls For Annual Election
8:00 to 4:00 O'clock
Friday.

1

An innovation will be inauguratea
y the Women's League Friday when UNION TO HAVE NEW CHAIRS.
ie polling results of the annual elec-
on will be announced at the closing Subscriptions Will Be Taken For
ct of a playlet to be given at a gar- $2.00 Each.
en party. Those unable to vote dur- Before commencement 50 Michigan
ig the regular polling hour may vote Union members will have left perma-
t the party, which will supplant the nent individual memorials at the club-
>rmal installation of officers. house, according to the plans of Union
Mrs. Henry Douglas of 1620 Cam- officials who have provided 50 chairs
ridge road will entertain the mem- for which subscriptions are now be-
ers of the league at her home at 3:00 ing taken.

I

o'clock Friday afternoon. A fantasti-
cal play, "Pandora," will be presented
on the lawn by league members.
The polls for the election Friday
will be at Barbour gym and in the east
corridor of the general library. Votes
may be cast from 8:00 until 4:00
o'clock. Women may vote at the par-
ty until the opening of the play, and
the announcement of the successful
candidates for the ensuing year will
be made at the close of the perfprm-

The chairs, which will bear metal
plates with the names of. the owners
inscribed upon them and which will
be placed in the dining room and
dance hall of the clubhouse, are being
offered to subscribers at $2.00 each
The factory cost of the chairs, which
are made of fumed oak, is $3.50 each.
Subscriptions may be made by ali
members. It is planned to offer a
block of these chairs for subscription
each year. Chairs ordered now will
arrive before commencement.

The fresh soph games have reached
the "Movies." J. E. Butler, of the
Universal Film Mfg. Co., of New
York, was here Saturday and utilized
over 500 feet of film in making differ-
ent views of the relays, push ball con-
tests and after celebrations. This is
the first moving picture that has ever
been made of the spring contests.
Two copies of the picture will be
made by the Universal Film Co., one
for the Pathe Weekly, and another for
the Animated Weekly of New York,
which is also a popular picture period-
ical of the current news va-
riety.j

includes fraternity and sorority data
(Special to The Michigan Daily.) with vignetted half-tones of all lodg-
HAVERFORD, PA., May 19.-The es.
Michigan tennis team made a clean 'lDedicated to Late Prof. Smalley
sweep of the match, tournament here The Michiganensian is dedicated to
today, winning every event and shut- the memory of the late Prof. Harrison
ting out the home team. The final 3tandish Smalley, and contains an ar-
score was six to nothing. The local tile on his active life. The dedica-
players were completely outclassed tion page is a photogravure of Prof.
and seemed unable to solve the Wol- Smalley, made especially for the an
verines serves or returns. The sing- nual.
les were a little harder fought than The book this year is the largest and
the doubles but neither were excep- most' expensive edition in the history
tionally close. of the publication. Each-volume con-
Summaries: tain' 700 pages, and includes over
Singles: Reindel. Mich., beat Cary, 1,000 engravings.
Haverford, 6-8, 6-1,7-5; Hall, Mich., 'The annual w-ill be sold on the cam-
beat Allen, Haverford, 6-1, 4-6, 6-3; 'pus at the regular price of $2.50 until
Andrews, Mich., beat Van'Syckle, Hav the entire edition is exhausted.
erford, 6-1, 8-6; Wilson, Mich., beat
Halett, Haverford 6-0, 6-2. WilT Gigs Commencement Address
Doubles: Wilson and Reindell,Mich., Prof. R. M. Wenley has accepted the
beat Cary and . Allen, Haverford, invitation of President Brooks of the
8-6. 6-1; Hall and Andrews, Mich., University of: Oklahoma to give. the
beat Van Syckle and .Halett, Ilaver- commencement day address at that in-
ford, 6-4, 6-2. stitutio4.June 12.

: Laiy Regi er for Combined Courses,.
More appli.,ations for' the combined
literary-law and literary-medical
courses havy been handed in this year
than e (er before. Seventy-two have
regis;te red for the medical course as
compared with 45 last year and 49 for
the law course as against 40 in 1912.
The applications -will not be acted
upon until Registrar A G. Hall re-
turns froni his trip i northern Michi-
gan the last of nexT wek.

I I

700 Pages
975 Seniors
Over 1000 Engravings
Bound in Full Leather
Six Colored Inserts
Every Name in Book In-

THE

1913

MIC HIGA1N E NS I AN
ON SALE

G .

Wednesday

o-!o

Weather

Dedioated to
Harrison S malley.
Bigger, Better,
More Useful'
Thairlver
Same OldPrice
$25

At Flag Pole and

U

y.: b
,,

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