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May 18, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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WEATHER MAN
For Ann Arbor:
fair and cooler..

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Trill TO NOMINATE NEW COUNCLME
ORANGE iEa Eight Classes Will Meet to Cho
Representatives Monday.
Nominations for student coun
candidates will be made by eight clas
asN es, which will hold meetings tomorro
ANIMIAI MEET tfor the purpose. Junior lits will ele
Lthree men instead of two, becausec
J. Herbert Wilkins' seat in the cour
Ecl' being autonatically vacated, c
CAPT"'FAIN 11FF BREAKS RECORD account of absences. He cannot be
IN HALF MILE; FAST TIME candidate to succeed himself.
MADE IN BOTH The times of class meetings to b
1)ASHES. held tmorrow for the purpose of nom
inations ar as follows: junior lit
Michigan's track athletes took a 4:00 p. in., west physics lecture room
sweeping victory from Syracuse in the soph. lits, 4:15 p. in., Tappan hal
annual dual contest on Ferry field yes- sopli engineers, 4:30 p. m., room 31
terday afternoon. The score by which new engineering building; junior law:
the Wolverines swamped the Orange- 4:00 p. in., room D law building; fir
men was 80 to 42, and Farrell's prot- year laws, 4:00 p. i., room B Iav
eges were in no danger of being head- building;sand junior dents10:00Ba.m
ed at any time during the afternoon. junior laboratory, dental buildin
As the feature of the day, Captain Haff
of the Michigan team lowered the
track record for the half mile to 1.58, S H CPT R
beating the old mark held by C. H.
Hall of Michigan by one second.
Scoring nine firsts out of a possible / S RGAMES
13 events, and annexing a liberal por-
tion of the seconds and thirds, Michi-
gan totalled 75 points in the actual 0
comnpetition. The score was brought up
to an even 80 when the Orange run-
ners forfeited the mile relay race
which was to count five points for SECOND YEAR MEN ANNEX FIRS
the winner. Syracuse started well in AND THIRD RELAYS, BUT
the first four events, but Michigan LOSE PUSHBALL
gradually increased the lead and the CONTEST.
best the Methodists could do was to
total 42 points out of the possible 122. Balkan-costumed women, white
When Captain Haff of the Michigan trousered men conscious of their new
team romped home in the half mile in straws, a moving picture man, photog-
1.58, he furnished the sensation of the
day. Haff got away in the lead, though raphers with big cameras, and scores
Bowser of the Syracuse tea1 was of little snap-shooters saw the class
close on his heels. Bowser gave out of 1915 become victors of the spring
toward the finish, however, and Haff contests on south Ferry field yester-
won the event by a margin of several day morning. And a little German
yards. A peculiar feature of the race band played the overture. But the
was the fact that Haff's muscles kink- downfall of the freshmen was not in-
ed up on him on the back stretch and glorious, for by winning the heavy-
he was obliged to slow down consid- weight tug-of-war Thursday and the
erably. 'the coaches stated afterward second relay and push ball yesterday,
that had Haff run true to form, he the first year class amassed a total of
would have done the distance in 1.56 three points against the four counters
1-5. which represent the final score of the
Bond Equals Record in 100 Yard Dash. sophomores.
Two other notable performances oc- The contests were late in starting,
curred in the 100 yard dash and 220. but when the referee announced the
Bond took the first event, with Seward first relay at about 10:15 o'clock, both
a close second, in 9 4-5 seconds, tying classes were there with big pep. In the
Archie Hahn's record in the same initial race the two classes,took turns
event. In the 220 Seward cme in in being ahead, the sophs and fresh
first with Bond running easily at his each having leads of more than 50 yards
heels, and again the track record, held at various stages. It was the sophomor-
by Ralph Craig, was tied at 21 1-5 es' turn last, and Hughes scrambled
seconds. The remarkable time in through the last barrel and unfurled
both these events was due partially to the 1915 flag.far ahead of his compet-
the strong wind at the runners' backs, itor. The time was 8 minutes 54 1-5
however, and the judges would not al- seconds.
low the performances of the men to The second obstacle event went to
stand as tying the records. the freshmen although the sophs held
-Haimbaugh ran a game two mile a big lead during the early laps. Pearl,
race, winning easily, though the time who finished the race for the younger.
of 10 minutes 2-5 seconds was noth- team, had room to spare. Time was 8
ing wonderful. Jansen ran a beauti- minutes, 49 3-5 seconds.
ful quarter in 50 4-5. W. A. Sargent In the third contest, the freshmen
of Syracuse jumped into the limelight took long rests on the fences and
by his spurting finish in the mile balked at the barrels, permitting the
which gave that event to the visitors sophomore runner to come in the
in 4.37. range of the moving picture machine
The summaries of the events follow: nearly a lap ahead of the other con-
100-yard dash-Bond (M) first; Sew- testant. Time wa 8 minutes, 46 3-5
ard (M) second; Downey (S) third.' seconds.
Time 9 4-5 seconds.jSophs Overwhelmed in Pushball Fight.
120-yard high hurdles-Adams (S) In the pushball fight which followed,
first; Greene (M) second; Craig (M) sophomores were greatly outnumber-
third. Time 16 seconds. ed, only about 300 representing the
Mile run-W. A. Sargent (S) first; class in comparison to the 500 fresh-
C. M. Smith (M) second; Lamey (M) 'men. The smaller team permitted the
third. Time 4 minutes 37 seconds. , 1916 team to cross but one goal al-
440-yard dash-Jansen (M) first; though the ball was within two yards
Bowzer (S) second; Donohue (S) 'of the sophomore line when the ref-
tthird. Time 50 4-5 seconds. eree called an end to the struggle.

Two mile run-Haimbaugh (M) The-freshmen made the first point at
first; Danes (S) second; Keesler (S) the end of the first five-minute quar-
third. Time 10 minutes 2-5 second. ter. Sophomore warriors were over-
220=yard low hurdles-Craig (M) whelmed at the start by the big fresh-
first; Adams (S) second; C. S. White mnan aggregation and the flying squad-
(M) third. Time 24 3-5 seconds. I ron which hit the line effectively after
220-yard dash-.Seward (M) first; the larger body had charged. The sec-
(Continued on page 4.) (Continued on page 4.)

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 18, 1913,

aPR..ICE FIV:L

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FINAL CONCERT IS
TRUE MEMORIAI
Funeral March an Impressive ribial
to Founder of Hill
Auditorium.
The spirit of the Twentieth Ma
festival was consecrated last evenin
when the vast audience rose to its fe
in reverence and gratitude to Arthu
Hill, the generous donor of the beau
tiful new auditorium. The sublim
"Funeral March" from the Wagne
"Goetterdaenimerung" was perforine,
by Frederick Stock and his orchestr
in memoriam of Mr. Hill and the per
formance was as noble as the spiri
which prompted its dedication.
The whole concert in point of con
tent and performance formed a fittin
close to the finest festival that Mich
igan has ever had. In an impressive
performance of the first at from "Lo
lengrin" and the "Mastersingers'
finale, Albert Stanley, as conductor
and the Choral Union did their mos
ambitious and finest work of the whol
festival. The Chicago orchestra gave
its two numbers with surpassing beau-
ty of spirit and expression.
Mme. Marie Rappold sang the rol
of Elsa with deep sympathy and th
same exquisite purity of tone which
charmed her audience in the Wednes-
day concert. The other solo parts were
made especially effective by Lambert
Murphy, Miss Rosalie Wirthlin, Wil-
iam Hinshaw, Henri Scott, and Fred-
erick Munson.
W'omen Play Preliminaries in Tennis.
Women have played three sets of
ennis in the preliminary contests to
ate. Ellen Sargeant, '16, Grace Bab-
ock, '14, and Catherine Mackaye, '13,
have qualified for the second elimina-
ion sets. The latter game was won
y default. Two sets will be, play;lA
omorrow on Palmer field.
LSE TO CORNELL
IN TENNIS MATCH
(Special to The Michigan lDaily.)
ITHACA, N. Y., May 17.-Michigan's
ennis team went down to a 4 to 2 de-
eat before the Cornell racquet wield-
rs this afternoon in a lively match.
'he Wolverines and Ithacans broke
ven in the single events, but in the
oubles the Cornell players had the
dvantage over the men from Ann Ar-
or.
The scores:
Singles-Benton (C) defeated An-
rews (M) 6-1, 6-1; Cummins (C)
efeated Hall (M) 3-6, 6-3, 6-4;
Ilson (M) defeated Peters (C) 6-3,
-6, 7-5; Reindel (M) defeated
'ewksbury (C) 4-6, 6-3, 6--4.
Doubles-Benton and Peters (C) de-
ated Andrews and Hall (M) 6-1,
-4. Cummins and Bowers (C) de-
ated Wilson and Reindel (M) 6-0.
-3.

WOLVERINES ROMP
AWAY WITH M.AICI

STUDENT DROWNS IN CANOE
UPSET AT. FORESTRY CA

Find l'avi'ues Pitcher Easy ;
Qua iitance Flue(
S ti sior(-.

(Give

(Detroit News Service.)
LANSING, .kICl -, May 17.-Michi-
gan defeated M. A. C. at baseball today
in a walkaway, registering 9 tallies
against 2 for the Aggies. The Wolver-
ines found La Fever the Farmers'
freshman pitcher in the early innings"
and sewed up the contest in the first:
four frames. Quaintance held Mack-
lin's men well in check throughout
the entire game for, although eight hits
were collected from his delivery, he
was given fine support and pulled out
of the majority of the bad holes.
The third and fourth periods were
the big score getting sessions for the
Wolverines. In the third, 1~ickey's
men connected for a quartet of tallies,
and in the fourth secured three more
apparently without any trouble. Al-
together the visitors secured a total
of 13 safeties from the (lelivery of La
Fever and Peterson who was sent in
to supplant him when the Michigan
fusilade became too heavy. Sisier's
batting featured the game, as the
first baseman-pitcher hit safely three
out of his four trips to the plate.
The score:
NiCh. .. 0 4 3 0 1 00 0-9-13-2
M. A.C. ..0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1-2- 8--2
Batteries-Quaintance and Webber;
La Fever, Peterson and Bibbins.
(Editor's Note. When the train on
which the Allichigan team was to returnl
to Ann Arbor rolled in last night,
>ach Rickey and lughitt were the onlyI
nembers of the Michigan party to
alight. The others were presumablyi
left at Jackson. Manager Ford, cus-
todian of the score book, vas a men-
ber of the party that was left, and a.
box score was not obtainable at a latet
hour last evening.)7

* T * 12'13
* -0-
* . l , Iindm1er:16, 'lood poison.
* ing.
'arVT i u Judy, '1 1I, septiicemia
A-. V. Bacon, . dr wlmed.
*A. J. Crandall, '16, dironed.
Ella Ry sdorp, '1), drowined.
A. J. Brummeler, '14, ptomaine
* poisoning.
A. IV. Tll, '131 "i u down by
Paul Saimpson, '14, drowned.
*-* * * * *- * * *
DmIC%KI N SOAhN T O
HEAD MICHIGAN

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PAUL SAMPSON, '14, IS VICTI]
ACIDENT ON ANNUAL F
DAY AT EINZE3IAN LAKE,
SINKS JUST AS AID ARR

PAYS TRIBUTE TO
NEW AUDITORIUM
"It is perfect," said Frederick Stock,
conductor of the Chicago Symphony
orchestra, speaking yesterday of the
111il auditorium. "When Mr. Stanley
was conducting on Thursday evening,
I went over the building and listened
from every possible point. There
seems to be no flaw anywhere; the
acoustics are perfect. Of course on
the extended platform a small part of
the orchestra is a trifle out of focus,
but that is easily remedied. And such
a building improves with age like a
violin; it must get tempered to the
sound. Naturally, the plaster is still
damp; and the hall will not reach its
full perfection for music within a year.
You should be proud of your new au-
ditorium; there is not another build-
ing like it in the country."
Ed icatienal Club to Hear Dr. Angell.
At a meeting of the Educational
club, to be held in room 105 of Tap-
pan hall at 7:10 o'clock Monday night,
President-Emeritus James B. Angell
will speak on the "Chinese Question."

t
I

PRICE FIVE C

'E'\IOI IAT WiNS CIASE RA(E
LXNDS .JOH AS
Selden S. D ickinson, '1 3-':it, was
elected president of the Michigan Un-
ion for the year 1913-1914 by a plu-
rality of 43 votes over Louis F. Hal-
ler, yesterday. Dickinson received 206
votes against 163 for 1 aller, while
Maurice C. Myers, '11-'13L, the third
man in the race for first honors, gar-
nered, a total of 122 votes.
Fred Gould, '14, was chosen as re-
cording secretary, (lefeating Werner
Schroeder., '14, and Edwin Thurs-'
ton, '13-'15L, by the narrow margin of
15 and 12 votes respectively. H. M:
Bates, H. C. Adams, and Reuben Pet-
erson were picked as faculty advisers.
The vice-presidencies for the vari-
ous departments went to the following
nen: lit, Cyril Quinn, '14; engineering,
George I. Duffield, '14E; law, Maur-
ice Toulme, '12-'14L; medic, Maurice
Lohman, '15M; combined, S. Spencer
Scott, '14P. .
A total of 491 votes were cast in the
election. This number is more than
twice as large as the election regis-
tration in 1912. Dickinson, the presi-
lent elect, carried all five departments
vith the exception of the lain school,
where Maller and Myers both ran
slightly ahead. The heaviest ballot-
ng came from the lit department,
vhich cast an aggregate of 234 votes,
the engineering department running
second with 137.
OUR CLASSES WILL PRESENT
DANCES AT WOMEN'S FIELD lDAY

Puliotor and Every Possible Mleti
of Resuscitationt Ised in Four
Hlour Struggle With.
D~eath.
Paul Sampson, '14, Leroy, N. Y., a
drowned early yesterday afterno
when his canoe capsized on Lake Hei
zeman, where the foresters were ho]
ing their annual camp and field d
His body was recovered after it h
been in the water for an hour a:
forty minutes, and artificial respirati
was immediately applied and conti
ned for four hours before hope of n
suscitation was abandoned. Sampso
was paddling across the south end
the lake after the conclusion of ti
swimming race when the tragedy o
curred. Ile was alone in the canc
and seated in the rear of the cra-
when a stiff wind sweeping down t
lake overturned the boat. He imm
diately grasped the overturned bo
with the idea of hanging on until a
could reach him.
Wallace Trigg, '13, was also pa
dling across the lake at the same tin
as Sampson, and when the accide
occurred he was but a short distan<
from the unfortunate student. Imm
diately he changed the course of h
boat and went to aid Sampson. Wh
he was but a few feet from the ove
turned craft, Sampson let go of h
boat and attempted to swim to tl
other canoe. He could not swim moi
than a few strokes, and when almo
within reach of the rescuing boat I
sank.
Trigg saw that he was going to sin
and, at the moment he noticed th
Sampson's strength was failing, h+
dlove from his canoe to the aid of h
comrade. However, Sampson sank be
fore Trigg could reach him, and r
peated efforta on the part of the othe
failed to bring him to the surface.
Nearly a score of his companion
hastened to aid in the search for t
body, but nothing could be accon-
plished until the sheriff's force arrive
with grappling hooks.- Three hook
were attached to a 70 foot rope an
the body was brought to the surfac
at nearly the exact spot where i
sank.
The body was hurried to the bank an
artificial respiration was begun a
once. Dr. E. A. Clarke, coroner, arrive
on the scene with the Edison compa
ny's pulmotor almost at the same tim
that the searchers reached the shor
Three tanks of oxygen were used i
an attempt to bring back life, and i
dozen of the foresters continued th
work after the oxygen supply was ex
hausted.
The body was kept covered with ho
blankets, and the work of resuscita
tion was continued until 7:30 o'cloc
before hope was abandoned. It wa
then taken charge of by uiidertaker E
Dieterle, who brought the remains t
town and prepared them for burial,
J. P. Sampson, the father of the vic
tim, and a younger brother at Annap
olis were notified by telegraph imme
diately after the tragedy and are ex
peted to arrive in the city this morn

'
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'(

Prof. de Miaralt Back From Gernmany.
Professor Carl L. de' Muralt of the
electrical engineering departinent, who
has been in Berlin, Germany, for the

last month as consulting engineer of Officers for the ensuing year will be
the Stadt and Ring Bahn, returned elected, and each member may bring a
Thursday to resume his university friend. It is hoped that there will be
work. a large crowd to hear TDr. Angell.

Dances for the annual Women's
Field day May 23 will be presented by
the four classes. The seniors in caps
and gowns will parade about Palmer
field, forming the class numerals and
the block "M." The sophomores will
dance the May pole frolic. The juniors
and freshmen have not decided upon
their entertainment. Seventy-five sen-
ior women, 40 freshmen, 40 juniors
and 32 sophomores will take part in
these dances, which begin at 6:30 p.m.
Cleeland Pastor Speaks Ton ight.
The Rev. Dan F. Bradley, pastor of
the Pilgrim church of Cleveland, Ohio,
will speak at the Congregational
church this evening at 7:45 o'clock, at
the regular union service. The Rev.
Pradley was formerly a president of
Iowa college at Grinnell.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

10:30 A. M -Mother's Day Service.
L. A. Barrett.
12:io-University Bible Classes.
:30 P. M.-Young People's Meeting.

Subject: " Ideal Motherhood,"

Sampson was a member of Les-Voy
,ageurs, the honorary forester's soc
ety, and had submitted a manuscril
for next year's opera. He was also
member of the New York State clu
(Continued on page 4.) u

S'itdents welcome.

---

I

(Continued on page 4.)

TONIGHT
Union Series

- UCONGREGATIONAL

,.

Rev.

Dan.

Bradley

CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
7:45 P. M.

of Pilgrim Congregational Church
CLEVELAND, OHIO

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