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May 16, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-16

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The, n

MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

Daily

'

READ DAILY BY
5,000 STUDENTS.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

11, No. 161.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1913.

_ _ _ _ _. - .

US WITH

ROF. STANLEY
WINS TRIUMPH,

Second Night of May Festival is
Another Brilliant Performance,
With All Artists
Satisfying.
HILL AUDITORIUM IS A4AIN
FILLED TO ITS CPACITY.
Schumann-Heink and Florence Hinkle
(wry Leading Roles in
"Requiem."
Again last evening the Hill audi-
torium was the center of interest to
all Ann Arbor for the second concert
of the May Festival. Again the vast
hall was filled to capacity, and again
the tconcert left nothing to be desired
In point of performance, inspiration, or
enthusiasm. From the thunderous en-
semble of chorus and orchestra down
to the thinnest tone of voice or violin,
the ear never caught the faintest echo.
Chorus Achieves Triumph
In the Verdi "Requiem" the Choral
Union fulfilled the promise it made
on Wednesday evening by its impres-
sive performance of Albert Stanley's
Laus Deo." Mr. Stanley's conducting
was masterful, and his chorus was
finely responsive to every shade of his
interpretation.
In finish, in tonal modulation, and in
precision of attack, the chorus sur-
passed all its previous efforts. The
softly breathed accompaniment to the
opening theme of the violins, and the
long sustained chords through the solo
recitative in the final "Libera mo'
were beautifully intoned. In the spln-
did climax of the "Sanctus" the chor-
us rose to a superb volume with no ev-
idence of effort and with a triumphant
force.-
The wisdom of Mr. Stanley's judg-
ment in selecting the too-seldom heard
"Requiem" was apparent to everyone.
It is not all what our northern temper
would call sacred music., but it is rich
with all of Verdi's melodic and orches-
tral resources, and is above all pro-
foundly sincere.
Artists Please- Audience.
Miss Florence Hinkle in the soprano
part gave a performance that was
spect. Her art is supreme in its poise,
its restraint, and its emotional purity.
Her voice last evening was marvel-
ously pure and clear. Her high mez-
zo-voce notes were free, clear, and.
delicious to hear; and all down the
range of her tones there was perfect
smoothness, perfect control.
Madame Schumann-Heink won the
ovation which she always wins. Hers
is an art that seemingly can never
decline. She will always be the same
noble woman and the same noble art-
ist, and she will always move the
hearts of her hearers with that ap-
peal which comes from her own great
heart.
The tenor role of the "Requiem"
gave Lambert Murphy no very good
opportunity to display his finely man-
aged voice. His tones were well mod-
ulated and resonant, and his phrasing
broad and meaningful. Henri Scott
justified the expectation which his rep-
utation has aroused, and his singing
won high praise.
For the afternoon concert today
Mme. Schumann-Heink will be the so-
loist, and the Children's chorus will
make its appearance in "The Walrus
and the Carpenter." The evening con-
cert will be somewhat popular in char-
acter, with Signor Pasquale Amato, the
famous baritone as soloist.

TUG-OF-WAR RULES
* -0-*
*For the contestants:-*
* 1.* Each contest- to count one*
* point.*
* 2. Light weight first, fresh-*
Smen on north bank. Middle*
* weight second, sophomores on "
* north bank. Heavy weight third, *
* freshmen on north bank. *
* 3. Footholds to be dug with *
* heels only, and not until signal *
* is given. *
* 4. No metal cleats allowed. *
* 5. Only anchor man to wind *
* rope around body. *
* 6. Team succeeding in pull- *
* ing banner to touch its side of *
* the river is declared winner. *
7. Each team will be compos- *
* ed of 60men. *
* 8. One man cannot pull in *
* more than one tug.
* For the spectators-
* 1. Keep off the island. *
* 2. Remain back of restrain-
* ing ropes. *

BLANSHARD IS
VICTORIOUS AT
PEACECONTEST
Paul Blanshard, '14, Wins National
Oratorical Event at Lake
Mohionk Yesterday
Afternoon.
MICHIGAN MAN NEVER SPOKE
BETTER SAYS P1ROF. TRUE BLODI,00

Westerner Took Second Place,
Eastern Maii is Relegated
f'" 11till-u,

and I

YEAR BOOK IS
UNIQUE WITH
3,000 Students Are Listed With Refer.
enee to Pages on Which Their.
Nanes of Pictures Appear
in Annual.
MJIHINENSIAN WILL GO
ON SALE NEXT TUESDAY.
Volume Contains More Than 700 Pages
of Engraving and Reading
Matter.
One of the distinctive features which
will characterize the 1913 Michiganen-
sian is the 3,000 name index of every
student whose name appears in the
book, which is in accordance with the
ruling of the board in control of stu-
dent publications. Following each
name, will be printed the page or pag-
es upon which that name appears.
The Michiganensian is the only annu-
al in the country with this distinct
feature.
The Michiganensian will be put on
sale at the usual campus stands Tues-
day morning, which is earlier than
that of any other western annual. De-
spite the fact that this year's book
is larger and reppresents more
beautiful workmanship than any other
edition, the annual will sell at the
same price of $2..50.
This year's annual will be bound in
full black cow-hide pebbled grain
leather, stamped with the title and
university seal in gold leaf. The an-
nual contains 700 pages of engravings
and reading matter. A sample copy of
the book has been received by the edi-
tors, and because of the especially at-
tractive features, the annual this year,
in beauty and design, far outclasses
that of any previous edition.
THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast For Ann Arbor-Friday,
unsettled and cooler.
University Observatory - Thursday,
7:00 p. i., temperature 61.0; maxi-
mum temperature, 24 hours preceding,
79.8; minimum temperature, 24 hours
preceding, 43.8; average wind veloci-
ty, 10 miles per hour; precipitation,
1.81 inches.

to 'T' rd.
(Special to The Michigan Daily.)
LAKE MOHONK, N. Y., May 15.-
Paul Blanhard, '14, won the Nation-
al Peace Oratorical contest here this
afternoon for the central division of
states as the representative of the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
Vernon Welsh, of Knox College,
Monmouth, Ill., representing the
western states, spoke first with a well
organized oration on "Assurance of
Peace." Blanshard followed with his
oration "The Evolution of Patriotism,"
and in the opinion of his coach, Prof.
T. C. Trueblood, of Michigan, who had
charge of the contest, he never spoke
better.
C. Magruder, of St. Johns College,
Md., representing the eastern states,
spoke last on "Phases of the Peace
Movement." His oration and person-
ality made him a dangerous coupeti-
(Continued on page 4.)
BOARD IN CONTROL
NOMINEES CHOSEN
Election of Three New Student M.1em-
bers to be Held Next
Thursday.
ALL STUDENTS RAVE SUFIRA GE.
The student constituency of the
1913-14 board in control of student
publications will be determined upon
at an election to be held in University
hall next Thursday afternoon from
2:00 to 5:00 o'clock; at which time,
three men will be- elected to one year
terms. The nominees, as named by
the editors of the campus publications
and approved by the present board
are: Carl W. Eberbach, '12-'15M, Jam-

UNDERCLASSES
BATTLE TODAY
ACROSS HURON
Sojlis Bold Mass Meeting and Vow to
A venge FormerI Defea ts; Will
Post Lists of Teams This
rgori2ng.
HOLD RELAY TI'RYOUTIS AT
SOUT1hI FERRY FIELD TODAY
Many Soplis Still Lacking For Light
Weight Tug and
Relavs.
Erstwhile defeated sophomores
gathered in the physics building last
night to the number of 300 and swore
to avenge failures of the past across
the Huron this afternoon.
The light weight pull will begin at
4:15 o'clock sharp, and lists of the
teams will be posted this morning in
Waterman gym and University hall.
Bulletins will be posted in the same
places to direct members of the teams
when and where to meet. Several men
are still needed to complete the soph-
omore light weight team and a final
opportunity will be given to weigh in
at Waterman gym between 1:00 and-
2:00 o'clock.
Relay tryouts were interrupted byI
rain and a final opportunity will be
given runners on south Ferry field be-
tween 1:30 and 3:00 o'clock this af-
ternoon. Less than half enough sophs
have tried out for the teams and un-
less more 1915 runners are present
this afternoon it will be necessary to
forfeit some of the events.
Lists of men picked for relay teams
wi" be posted in Waterman gym and
University hall at 3:30 o'clock this af-
ternoon.
UNION ELECTIONS
OCCUR SATURDAY
Polls Open From 8:30 to 2:30 to Avoid
Conflict With Spring
Games.
LARGE VOTE IS ANTICIPATED
Officers of the Michigan Union for
the 1913-14 college year will be chosen
at the regular election, to be held to-
morrow at the Union. President
Kemp announced last night that the
polls will be open from 8:30 a. m.

*THE.1 TUG-OF-WAR CONTEST.
-0--
* Timek4:r15 sharp. *
* Place-Huron river below Mich-*
* igan Central freight depot. *
*Referee-George pF. Patterson;*
* assistants, Carroll Haff, and '
'~Joseph Bell.
*Timekeepers-Clemnent Quinn,*
* George C. Thompson, and Otto *
C. Carpell.
Officials-North bank, Bell,Dick-
* enson, Coolidge, Lippincott,
* Schroeder, Grismore, Van *
* Dyke, Saler, Wood, Hancock, *
Keliher, Stouffer, Strickland,
and Reinhart.
* South bank, Wilson, Spinning, *
* C. Quinn, Mayall, McCoy,*
Woleslagel, Hopkin, Drury,
* Fletcher, Trum, Lawrence,
* Pennell, Gould, Gibbs, and
B Iarringer. . . ..
Island, Kohler, Brown, Patter-
* son,, and Hulbert.
* * * * * * * * *$ * *
MEN NOHINATED FOR MICH- *
IGAN UNION OFFICES. *
* Election, Saturday, May 17. *
* -0-*
President *
* Selden S. Dickenson, '13-'15L. *
* Louis F. Haller, '11,'14L. *
* Maurice C. Myers, '11-'14L.
* Vice-President-Lit Dept.
" Cyril Quinn, '14.
*' Robert Sturtevant, '14.
* Charles Webber, '14.
* Vice-Pres.--Engineering Dept. *
* Charles A. Crowe, '14E. *
* George . Duffield, '14E.
* Albert Fletcher, '14E. *
* Vice-Pres.- Law Dept. *
* Frank Murphy, '12-'14L. *
* Maurice Toulme, '12-'14L.
Tice-Lres.-Med ic 1Dept. *
* Carl Eberbach, '16M. *
* Maurice Lohman, '15M.
'e' Vice-Pres.-Combined Dept. *
* S. Spencer Scott, '141'. *
Recording Secretary *
* Fred Gould, '14.
* Werner Schroeder, '14. 4
* Edwin Thurston, '13-'15L. *
Faculty Advisers
* 1. M. Bates. *=
* H1 C. Adams. *
* Reuben Peterson. *
** * * * * * * * * *
TRACK TEAM AGAIN
LOSES 440 MAN
Jansen Lost 'For Syracuse Meet by
Illness of Father, and Itaff
Only Other Man.

ENGINEERING
.EXHIBIT RUNS
AGAIN TODAY
Big Crowd All Day at Remarkable
Exhibition of Engineers and
Their Classes Are Again
Dismissed
P11ES. HU1TCHINS WORK WHEN
FRESH ENGINEER IS SHOWN.
Conductors and Board of Trade Aro
Coming Today From Detroit
and Cleveland.
With the automatic register indicat-
ing that 6,982 visitors had passed
through the halls of the engineering
building up to 10:00 o'clock last night,
the first day of the initial exhibit of the
engineering, architectural, and forest-
ry departments came to a successful
close. All day the corridors and the
exhibition rooms were filled to their
capacity with a crowd of May festi-
val visitors, and students and faculties
of other departments.
All of thespecial features were op-
erated, and the booths were arranged
so as to accommodate the large crowd
most efficiently., Guides directed the
crowd at every turn, and although
there was a little confusion in the
morning, at the beginning of the af-
ternoon order had been established
and all sightseers followed a definite
course.
Conductors and Merchants Coming.
Because of the visit of 1,000 conduc-
tors from the Detroit convention, and
the delegation of'50 members of the
Cleveland Board of Trade this morn-
ing, who are coming especially to see
the university and exhibit, the big
show will be continued in operation
from 9:00 until 3:30 o'clock this af-
ternoon.
As a result, all classes in the engi-
nieering department will be excused
for the day. All junior engineers who
are not engaged at the present on the
exhibit, are requested to meet at Dean
Effinger's office at 8:45 o'clock this
morning, to march to the Michigan
Central station to meet the delegation
of conductors, and act as guides to
them during their two hours' stay on
the campus.
Among the interesting features of
the exhibit are the miniatur e irri-
gation project, the cement plant, the
water turbines, the naval tank, the ar-
chitectural drawings, and the forestry
display rooms. The continuous illus-
trated lecture on forestry by Prof.
Lovejoy was attended by a crowd
throughout the afternoon.
Freshman Work of President Shown.
A curiosity is a design of a stone
bridge, by Pres. H. B. Hutchins, '71,
which was drawn when he was a
freshman in the engineering depart-
ment, in '68.
The electrical conditions of the at-
mosphere prevented the sending of
wireless messages, but if conditions
permit today, the two dozen which
were handed in during the day will
be sent this morning.
JUNIOR TRYOUTS FOR CHEER
LEADER UTO BE INSTRUCTED.
All junior tryouts for cheer leaders
must notify by post cards Harold S.
Hulbert,, '14M, 304 North Ingalls
street, before Saturday noon. From

Saturday afternoon, they will be in-
structed for two weeks. and will make
their first public tryout on May 30 at
the M. A. C. game. Four public try-
outs will be given before their selec-
tion, and the successful candidates
will take office in the fall.

i

es E. Hancock, '13E, Edward G. Kemp, to 2:30 p. m. IIAIMNU ILL RU St'rDMY
'12-'14L, Carl G. Schoeffel, '13-'15L, Last year only 209 members of the __IS_
Frank W. Murphy, '14L, Roland W. Union took the opportunity of attend- I will be a weakened Michigan team
Fixel, '12-'14L, Charles A. Crowe, '14E, ing the polling place, but the light bal- I
Edward R. Thurson, '13-'15L, and loting was caused by the oc- that will attempt to take a second vic-
Harold Abbott, '13. currence of the spring con- tory from Syracuse in the dual meet
Every member of the student body tests at the same time, rath- on Ferry field Saturday. In contrast
is entitled to balloting privileges in er than on account of lack of inter- to the announcement that Haff, Kohler
this election, having the right to vote est. It is expected that tomorrow's
and :Haimnbaugh will be in shape to
for any three of the nine candidates election will be better attended, inas-
in the running. The successful con- much as the membership of the Union compete, comes the news that Janseli
testants will take their seats at the has been practically doubled this year. has been called home by the illness of
opening of school next fall. his father.
Women Will Play Tennis Series. Haimnbaugh has improved enough to
FORMER WIFE OF DONOR OF Weather permitting, the first sets of, make his appearance seem a certainty,
AUDITORtIUMi LOSES JEWELS the preliminary tennis contests among and Kohler did a little work yesterday
the women will begin this afternoon with the shot before the rain chased
.oat Palmer field. No definite time is set him to shelter. Trainer Farrell ex-
Mrs. Langdon C. Ross, of Chicago, for these preliminary games, those tak- pects that he will be able to win the
former wife of the late Arthur Hill, ing part being allowed to fx a time hammer throw even while crippled,
has reported to the police the loss of suitable to themselves in accord- but will not enter him here unless he
a diamond pin, valued at $1,500, while ance with their class work. has recovered entirely by Saturday.
attending the opening concert of the In the quarter, Jansen's absence
May festival Wednesday night. Oratorical Board Meets Tuesday. may cause the trainer to use Haff in
It is the belief of the police that A meeting of the Oratorical asso- the half mile. Jansen was the only
Mrs. Ross was the victim of profes- ciation board will be held Tuesday at quarter miler taken on the Cornell trip,
sional "dips" attracted here by the 7:Uo o'clock, at which time nomina- and was to be his team's sole depend-
crowds attending the festival. Mrs. ( tions in addition to those already ence in this event against Syracuse.
Ross, however, is not certain whether made by petition will be considered Now it looks as though Haff would be
the pin was stolen or lost. for the election of officers. The elec-' shifted into the quarter, and Brown
it. tion will probably be held May 24. ( and Lamey left in the half.

,. .5

IPages.
Senior Pictures.
er 1000 Engravings.
Fund in Full Leather.
ery Name in Book In-

THE

1913

MICHIGANENSIAN
On Sale

Bigger Better
More Useful Than
Ever
Same Old Price
$2.50

TUESDAY, MAY 20, 8 A. M .(WEATHER PERMITTING)
At Flag Pole and Law Walks

- ~
I ~

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