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May 15, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-15

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MNY MO4IRNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

M
V&aI

Daily

READ DAILY BY
5,000 STUDENTS.

... _ # .

PRICE FIVE 0:

No. 16 0.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1913.

a H

ILL AUDITORIUM RECEIVES
IMMENSE CROWO AT FESTIVAL

New University Building Is Taxed to
its Full Capacity of 6,00
At Initial Concert of
20th Festival,
PRESENT PORTRAIT OF PROF.
A.A. STANLEY TO UNIVERSITY
Chilcago Symphony Orchestra, Prof.
Stanley's 1%aus eo" and ie.
Rappold Delight Audience.
It is 'seldom that an event trans-
pires of such significance to the, uni-
versity, the city, and the state as the
opening of the new Hill Auditorium
for the first concert of the twentieth
annual .May festival. To fudge from
the inspiration and enthusiastic re-
ception of this first concert, the festi-
val this year will be a landmark in the
musical life of Ann Arbor and of Mich-
igan. And the audience which filled
the magnificent structure to the capac-
ity of ,00, was as deeply impressed
with !the beautiful hall as with the
ooncert.'
The importance of the event was fur-
ther emphasized by the presentation to
the universityon behalf of the Choral
Union, of a fine portrait of Albert A.
Stanley. It is Mr. Stanley's devotion to
the cause of good music and his tire-
less energy in its furtheracs which
have made the May festival what it is
today. The presentation was made by
Samuel J. Hexter for the Choral Un-
ion immediately, following the per-
formance of Mr. Stanley's new work
written for the festival. President H.
B. Hutchins formally accepted the gift
on behalf of the board o regent, with
words of fine praise for Mr. Stanley.
The Chicago Symphony oohestra,
unhaxnpereQ i"y the usual reduced
numbers of 'the traveling orchestra,
played as it never played before in
Ann Arbor. Ini every detail of tone, of
ensemble and expression, Federick
Stock and his men reached the perfec-
tion of orchestral performance. The
Wagner numbers, the brilliant"Hudi-
gungsmarch" and'the "M~estersing-
er Vorspel," were given with eloquent -
effect,, and Mr. Stock's characteristic
appreciationi of Waner's glowing me-
lodic structure and vast climaxes. The
Beethoven Fifth ,Symphony, which]
formed the central part of the pro-]
gram, defies the power of words to ex
press the depth and spirituality of its
app eal. From the great opening vis-
tas of the first movement, through the
serene andante, the restles scherzo,]
and the victorious cry of the finale. Mr.
Stock's performance was a inater-
piece. of. sympathetic:.interpretation.
The Brahms "Academic Festival"
closed the concert in a genial burst of]
German song.
Mr. Stanley's composition, a "Laus
Deo" for the chrus and orchestra,
proved noble and full of dignity in
form and content. Offered by Mr.
Stanley and the Choral Union as a tes-
timonial of gratitude to Arthur Hill,
the wok formed a fine dedicatory me-s
morial.
Mine. )Varie Rappold was the soloista
of the evening, and won great favor
with her audience by her charming
personality and brilliant- display of
vocal art. She was most satisfying in
the "Fruehlingsnacht" and the "Vissi
d'Arte" from Tosca, both of which she
gave as encores. These were marked
by purity of tone, and an admirable]
restraint combined with much emo-
tional appeal..
In this evening's -concert, the Verdi
Manzoni Requiem will be given by the
Choral Union under Mr. Stanley, with
Schumann-H-eink, Florence Hinkle,

Lambert Murphy ndl Henri Scott as so-
loists, patrons should remember that
concerts begin promptly at 8:00
o'clock.
Dr. Stouffer to be CaM'hp Physician1.
Dr. C. B. Stouffer, '13H, has been ap-
pointed physician for Camp Bogardus,
the engineers' summer training head-
quarters. Dr. Stouffer was recently
appointed homeopathic physician for
the university M~edical attendance sys-

l1IIICIIGAmIJA WARIRS ROPE
IN TWELVE PALE FACE JUNIORS
Indian Braves Initiate Six Lits, Four
Engineers and Two
aws.
With, the setting of yesterday's sun,
the fifteenth sleep of the first moon
of the green leaves, Mchigamua came
forth from the wigwam, came forth
to make war upon the pale face na-
tion and carry back twelve from
among all the juniors on the campus.
Lean and hungry from the long and
weary council firepow-ows the eight-
'een Michigamnuas advanced with war
whoops and again made a trail and
carried hack into the lodge white men
who. were to be taught the red men's
ways by smoking the pipe of peace
and hearing the wise words of the
sachems of the tribe.
In the smoke talk that followed the
feast of the dog meat, words of wis-
dom and advice were spoken 'by the
faculty sachems, the old braves and
the braves of the fighting tribe. eap
Think Wenley and Battle Finder Bar-
telme told of the ancient customs and
the hunting grounds of the, future.
The following juniors were roped in:
engineering-Robert Braun, James
Craig,George Paterson,Herman Trum;
law-Miller Pontius, Louis 'Haler;
literary-Beach Carpenter,Willis Diek-
ema, Arthur Kohler, Cyril Quinn Wer-
ner Schroeder, Robert Sturtevent.
ELECT EIGHTEEN
TO LAW REVIEW
Two More Junior Barristers Will Be
__. Taken Into Socety
After Exams.
CONTRIBUJTE M1ONTHLY REPORTS.
Eighteen members of the junior law
class were yesterday elected to Law
Review, the legal honorary society.
The men chosen are: A. V. Baumann,
R. 3:. Curry, P. H. Dye, S. E. Gifford,
G, C. Grismore, L. P. Haller, . B.
Hughes, L. S. Hulbert, J. S. Kelly, G
k. Kennedy, L. R. Lackey, H. W. Lip-
pincott, D. F. Melhorn,. H. J. Plunkett,
H. V. Spike, W. F. Spikes, S. S. Wall,
and Chas. Weintraub. The selection
was made by the law faculty and was
passed wholly on scholarship.
Cufstomarily, twenty men are select-
ed, but the remaining two are to be
chosen after the June examinations.
The men selected will become mem-
bers of the board of editorial assist-
ants'of the Michigan Law Review and
will contribute reports monthly to that
paper, which is now edited by Prof.
Evans Holbrook.
BASEBALL FINALS
TO BEGIN TODAY.

ITHE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Friday,
cloudy and cooler.
University Observatory-Wednesday,
7:00 p. mn., temperature 54.2; maximium
temperature, 24 hours preceding, 59.8;
minimum temperature, 24 hours pre-
ceding, 478; average wind velocity 8
miles per hour; precipitation, 0.62
inches.
VARSITY GETS
EASY V I CTORY
ONITHACANS
Sisler Strikes Out 13 Cornelians and
Only Allows Six Hits; Johnson
Lasts But Four
Innings.
Cory and Stewart Work in Place of
Bell and Seehy in
Gardens.
The Big Red Team from Ithaca look-
ed very mammoth for about four in-
nings ;yesterday aternoon but from
then on it dwindled until the cold and
near weeping skies proclaimed the
fall of evening and the last strike on
the last batter found the Cornell ag-
gregation of no larger diameter than
several other ball clubs have been this
season. For four innnings it was nip
and rtuck with the easterners leading
by a single white chip, but after the
fourth the Michigan swat artists began
to welcome hurler Johnson in the right
fashion and when the regulation nine
periods had been successfully negoti-
ated the Red Team had gathered only
one more counter while the Wolver-
ines rejoiced in a half dozen.
As is the usual and expected cstom,
Sisler occupied the center of th-estll-
send liept dw soigh litoprator busy
halowng hni. The Akron wonder
whiffed thirteen of the visitors and al-
lowed only six hits, although it is not
stretching a point to say he would not
have allowed that number if he had
extended himself. Webber, who was
handling the big mit, caught °a good
game but he had trouble with Sisler'st
speed on account of a bad hand andf
the port side artist was forced to ease
up on' his work. Webber really was
taking a chance with his injured hand
and his work is to be commended.
Bell was kept out of the game by al
strained tendon and Cory and Stewart<
worked in the two starboard plots.i
Sheehy was out for practice and is ex-i
pected to be in Saturday's gamei
against the Farmers upstate. Today'sl
score is:
Cornell
ABR HPOA E
Jones rf..........4 00 0 1 11
Donovan 2b.........3 0 1 3 1 0
Kellar cf...........4 0 2 1 0 1
Clutei1b....... ....3 1 08001
Sherrick c..........4 1 1 ,6 2 0
Trainerif .....,....3 01 2 00
Adair 3b..........4 01 1 111
Taborss...........4 003 2 0
Jhnson p..........3 0 0,02 0
*Keating..........1 0 0 0 0 0

STAT 1E 410ARD1 PLANS TO
GIVE EMBALMNER'S EXAMS
Examinations by the State Board of
Health for embalmers will be held in
the medical building on July 9, 10, and
11. Candidates will be required to
take both written and oral examina-
tions. The regular tests, given by the
.state board of health for all sopho-
more and senior medics, will start
June 10.
ALLAYS FEAR S
FOR SYRACUSE
FRAY SATURDAY
Triuner FIarrell Says Haimbaugh,
:Kohler and Haff Will Be in
Shape for Clash With
Methodists.
Ithaca Reverse Due to. Inclement
Weather and Lack of 'Training
by Local Men.
While not up to his condition before
the relay races a week ago, Capt. Haff
is running at a fast enough clip to in-
sure a first place in the event he starts
in, whether it be the quarter or half
mile. Farrell plans to use him in the
half mile, as the competition here will
not be so keen as that in the quarter,
and the chances of his straining his
tendon again the slighter.
In other respects the Michigan track
squad is in better shape to annex a
victory than at any other time this
year. Held back by lack of good train-

WOODSMEN WILL HOLD FIELD DAY
Make Annual Visit to Farm Friday for
CampaiDemonstrations,
Pack saddles and sleeping bags are
now heing prepared and put in shape
for the annual Forester's Field Day at
the forestry farm west of Ann Arbor
The pack train will leave the Econom-
ics building Friday at 12:00 o'clock, not
to return until Monday. A commisary
will have all the necessary "grub" for
sale, so personal equipment will be the
only requirements for 'the individual
outfits.
Monday morning will be given over
to demonstrations of practical fores-
try. At noon the big feature of the
camp will be a barbeque, followed by
talks by Pres. Harry B. Hutchins and
Prof. Filibert Roth. The rest of the
afternoon will be given over to sports
and demonstrations, of packing.
CLASSES PREPARE
FOR ANNUAL FIGHT

Final Weighing and Relay
Be Held This
Afternoon

FIRST ANNUAL ENGINEERINS
EXHIBIT TO BE, HELD TOO

Tryouts to

SOPHOMORES TO M1UT TONIGHT.
With the annual Huron river strug-
ble but a day away expectations of vic-
tory are hanging over the camps of
both underclasses at a mass meeting

ing weather, none of the men were upI in the physics building last night aboutI

to form in the Cornell meet, and so
caunnotC be blamed for the resul t, b, .
]S y , ldra c: Q ? P ~ ' T ) l ~ t i l . h u e chl te s w ill h a v e tO f a c e
this Saturday .
Thee i2ar. always Bond and Seward
to be looked towards for points in the
hundred and two twenty yard dashes.
Jansen and, Haff' in the middle dis-
tances, and Haimbaugh, Brown, Lam-
ey and Smith in the long trots. Craig
is passing over the barriers in his last
year's form, followed closely by
Greene, though McNabb the other
member of the hurdling trio will be
kept out of the Syracuse melee with
a bad knee. With Cook, and Daskem
in the pole vault,_ Waring and Ferris
in the broad jump, Sargent a sure first
in the high ,jump, and to cap it all,
Kohler in the weights, the Maize and
Blue can take heart and expect a vic-
tory in Saturday's fray.
Clouds of doubt hovering over
Michigan's hopes for a victory in this
Saturday's dual meet with the track
men from Syracuse, are dispelled by
the statement of Trainer Farrell that
he now believes Haimbaugh, Kohler,
and Haff who have been on the hospi-
tal list will be inshape to do their
share of the point winning. The other
men upon whom he is depending, are

400 of the freshman victors of last
fall c swded into the -little lecture
iuom =arid vowed vengeance on the men
of 1915.,
Weighing in for the tug-of-war
teams yesterday was light and this af-
tern oon from 1:00 to 3:00 o'clock a
final opportunity will be given the un-
derclassmen to sign up at Waterman
gym. Several sophomores are needed
to complete the heavyweight team
while the freshman squad still needs a
few men of the heavy class. Captains
met at the Tan Beta Pi house last
night and the teams were picked as
far as possible. Lists of the teams will
be posted this afternoon in Waterman
gym and in University hall. George F.
Brown, '13E, who has charge of the
tugs said last night that the fresh
heavyweight team will average 180
pounds. Both middleweight teams
will average 160 while the lightweight
aggregations will be composed of men
of the 135 pound class.
The cont~est will begin tomorrow af-
ternoon at 4:15 o'clock with the light-
weight tug, the first year men occupy-
ing the erstwhile lucky north bank. In
the middleweight pull sophs will pull
from the north side of the river, while
'in the heavyweight struggle the 1916
class will again pull from the north
side. The battle site has been shifted

Exposition Which Will lBe Held in
Three Buildings Will Begin
at 10:00 O'lock This
Morning.
INSPECTION TOUR SHOULD BE
BEGUN AT ENGINEERING ARH
About 1,000 Conductors From Detroit
Conclave Will Visit Show
Friday.
Promptly at 10:00 o'clock this morn-
ing the set of nine whistles of the me-
chanical department display will be°
blown, the electrical department will
turn on the power, and the wheels o,
the first annual exhibition of the col-
leges of engineering, architecture and
forestry will begin to turn. All of the
displays have been set up, the power
features have been tested, and every-
thing is ready for sightseers. Because
of the inspection trip of 1,000 conduct-
ors from the Detroit convention, ]Fri-
day, and a' delegation o 500 visitors
from Cleveland, the exhibit will be
continued tomorrow with all of its
special features in operation.
To Be Held In Three Buildings
The exhibit will be held in three
buildings, the engineering and chem-
istry buildings and the engineering
shops. Visitors are requested tb be-
gin their tour at the south door of the
engineerilng archway. Arrows and
guides will direct the course of move-
ment' from this point., The directory
of exhibits in the engineering building
'Is as follows:
First floor-physical and highway
laboratory, wireless telephone and tel-
egraph, naval tank, forestry laborato-
ry, mechanical and hydraulic Tabora='
tory, electrical laboratory and elec-
trical museum.
Second floor-Architecture, engi-
neering library, Engineering Society
(rest room), mechanical and hydraul-
ic.
Third floor-General exhibit,° and
marine engineering.
Fourth floor-Forestry and free
hand drawing.
In the chemistry building, exhibits
will be held on every floor. On the
first floor are reheating furnaces of the
various types, cement and brick-test-
ing machines, assay furnaces, grind-,
ing and pulverizing mills, laboratories
for testing gas and iron, and for gas
analysis.
On the second, third and fourth
floors are laboratories for technologic-
al, organic, inorganic and general
chemistry work.
In the engineering shops, containing
pattern machines and forge shops, and
the foundry, will be found samples of
work done by students.
The electrical 'department will be
featured with wireless demonstrations,
telephone and telegraph appliances,
high tension, electrical equipments us-
ing 60,000 to 100,000 volts; photometer,
dictograph, ocillograph, modern light-
ing systems, and electric kitchen, au-
tomatic telophones, and different types
of magnetos and carburetors.
The marine engineering exhibit con-
tains models of ships illustrating
stream line flow, complete drawings of
yachts, freighters, motorboats and hy-
drop lanes; in the naval tank room
may be seen the operations of mold-
ing, cutting, shaping and finishing the
paraffin wax models of ships used in
tests. Visitors will be allowed to ride
on the car to observe how tsts are
made. Experienced men will be on
hand to help solve the problems of the
pleasure boat enthusiasts.'
The civil engineering department ;
exhibit will be grouped under six
heads,structural, hydraulic, trans- .

portation, municipal and sanitary, and~
geodetic, each branch having features:
of unusual interest.
Will Show. Tree Development.
Yoiing trees of different. species.
showing signs of development and~
their seeds, cones, acorns, etc., will be
on display in the forestry exhibit. A
display of forest products, wood grain-
ing, color photography, topographic
maps, a continuous illustrated lecture'
and many other features of forestry
(Continued on page 4.)

** * ** *** * ~ Totals .I........ 33
*Department Baseball Champions* * Batted for Tabor ini
*-0- *I ichigfan.
* Literary................ .1915 * j AB
*Engineering .............1.915 * Cory cf........4
*Law ....................1914 * Duncanson rf......3
*Medic... .. .........1916 * McQueen 2b.......4
*Dental............ ..1915 * Sisler p...... .....4
~ * * * * * * * *Stewart If ..........4
The above five teams will fight for Webber c...... .,. 4
the diamond championship of the cam- Baker ss ...........4
pus. Today, the fresh medics and Hughitt 3b ......... 3
fresh dents meet on the diamond to Pontius lb........2
settle which one will be eliminated -
from the race, leaving a quartette of Totals..........32
nines to battle for the coveted berth. 1 * Clute out on foul bun

2 6 24 11
ninth.

R
0
0
0
2
1
1
1
0
'1

H PO
1 0
0 0
1 1
3 2
2 0
1 12
2 6
1 0
0 5

A
0
0
5
0
0
1
4

3
0
0
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in trim to do their best, and are far! down the river several feet.
ahead of their condition on the eve Final relay tryouts will be held at
of the Cornell route. the fairgrounds this afternoon from
1lairnbaugh was out in a suit today, 2:00 to 5:30 o'clock. Less than half
but will do no running until Saturday. enough sophomfores turned out Tues-
His leg is much strongerthan on Tues- day and a few freshmen are still need-
dlay, when it would not support the ed to' make up a fast set of teams.
weight of his body. From the steps to- At the freshman mass meeting last
wards recovery that have been made, night H. S. Hulbert, '14M, explained
there seenms little doubt but that he the details: of the contests and warned
will win five points for the Maize and the first year men not to disturb local
13lue, theaters. One element of the class,
K~ohler. is still slightly laid up by however, gained admisison to the Bi-
blood poisoning on his ankle, canused jon and attempted to raid the Majestic.
by the chafing of his track slippers. Sophomores will hold a mass meet-
But even in the event of the trouble ing tonight at 7:00 o'clock in the west
hanging on, it will not effect his work physics lecture room. J. E. Hancock,
with the shot, it is believed.I '13E, will have charge of the meeting.

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IT'S

HEKE!

cul., SGargoyle
Humor as Seen Through Professional Specs.
THE STORES SELL IT SO DO THE BOYS

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