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October 19, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-19

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AT YOUR
OR $2.50

I

The

Michigan

Daily

I =AILED
ADDR.ESE

TO ANY
S $3.00

U

No. 16.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1912.

PRICE FIVE

,,
i -- - --

UCKEYE TEAM
CONFIDENT OF
.VICTOYTODAY
lN H AS FAI LLEN CONTINUOUSLY
FAVOING 0. S. U. AS THEIR
BACKFIELD OUTWEIGHS MICH.
PAN'S.
S.U. PLANS FOR VICTORY.
neup of Both Teams Undecided; Ru-
inored that Boyle Will Play
Riight H aif.
COLUMBUS, 0., Oct. 18.-With both
,ms apparently confident of victory,
chigan and O. S. U. are waiting to-
ght for the annual battle tomorrow.
is the fourteenth battle the two col-
;es have had and for the first time
the history of the athletic relations,
e Buckeye rooters are predicting a
Atory. Michigan has won eleven
d tied two, but according to the
pe that is given out here today, the
ig. record of Wolverine victories will
broken tomorrow.
lain has fallen continuously for the
st twelve hours and the field tomor-
w will be slow and heavy. The
1 of rain has been a heavy one and
)ugh the field is well drained, the
f is already exceedingly soft and
the rain has not stopped by 9:00
lock tonight, it is sure to be like
ialf dried duck pond tomorrow. The
t that the field will be heavy is
>ked upon as favorable to the
io team as their backfield far out-
ighs that of Michigan and the slip-
ry condition of the field will be con-
yive to the success of their line
eking. It is also counted that the
id ?will reduce the reputed speed of
Michigan backs and made Craig
d Boyle less formidable.
Expect Large Crowd.
Plans are being made for the big-
st crowd of the season here tomor-
w as the game ranks as the biggest
the Ohio schedule. Also the Buck-
s being conceded a great chance,
arge number of alumni are return-
to perchance rejoice in the ful-
ment of their hopes, a victory over
chigan. The' student body is all
itement and a great mass meeting
ight promised a battle royal in the
.tter of rooting when the Wolverine
ecial, as it is called, arrives tomor-
wv morning. Saturday night they
e planning a huge banquet to cele-
ite the hoped for victory, so that the
alry between the two schools will
at fever heat.
[he final lineup of the two teams
s not given out at a late hour to-
ht although Yost gave an indica-
n of what his battle array would
Richards refused to state his list
huskies but intimated that Capt.
rricklow's ankle was in good shape
d the sturdy leader would be fit for
fray tomorrow. It was predicted
t Ryan, the former Notre Dame
r, would be placed at end but the
se ones are whispering that he will
seen at his old job at half where
raised so much trouble for the Wol-
rines two years ago.
Michigan Lineup Wil Be Strong.
The Michigan lineup, according to
e dopesters and the intimations of
st, will be about the strongest the
rthern school can boast of. Barton
d Pontius will start at ends, Rayns-
-d and McHale- at tackles, Quinn
d Almendinger will work as guards
d Paterson will take care of the.
ater. At quarter Huebel will direct

e team and Thomson will be at his
ace at full. The question of the
lf backs is what is apparently both-
ng the Michigan mentor tonight
d it may be that he will not make
final choice until tomorrow. Ru-
>r has it, and rather strongly, that
.yle will start the contest at right
If while Craig will perform at left.
e condition of Craig makes this
ediction a bit doubtful as his ankle
d knee are still in bad shape. But
e lineup as given above seems the
obable and logical one.
Owing to the heavy downpour of

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Saturday
rain and colder.
University Observatory--Friday 7:00
p. m. temperature 62.2; maximum tem-
perature 65.4; minimum temperature
47.2; rainfall .68 inches; average wind
velocity 8 miles per hour.
HERMAN N SUDERMANN WILL NOT
SPEAK TO DEUTSCHER VEREIN.
Famous German Dramatic Writer Will
Not Make His Tour of
America.
Hermann Sudermann, the famous
German writer, who was expected to
speak this winter under the auspices
of the Deutscher Verein, has announc-
ed that he will not make his intended
tour of America. The Verein has se-
cured no one to fill Sudermann's place
and will probably not attempt to do
so. Several prominent Germans, how-
ever, will be in the United States dur-
ing the coming season and some of
them will undoubtedly deliver univer-
sity lectures here. Among these are
Warner Hegemann, planning expert
of Berlin, and the greatest living au-
thority in his- line; Prof C. Bezold,
famous orientalist from HeidelbeM,
and Heinrich Spiero, literary critic
from Hamburg.
The -Deutscher Verein has already
secured speakers two years ahead.
Next year Ludwig Fulda, well-known
author of "Def Dummkopf," the play
presented here two years ago, will vis-
it Ann Arbor. The following year Ot-
to Ernst, author of "Flachmann als
Erzieher," will deliver an address
here.
ROOTERS TO LOAD
SPECIAL TRAIN
>00 Tickets Sold for 0. S. U. Game;
Nearly 100 Purchased by
Fair Sex.

* * * * * * * * * *

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB ELECTS
CORRESPONDING SECRETARY

THIRTEEN YEARS
Michigan
1897 36
1900 0
1901 21
1902 86
1903 U
1904 31
1905 40
1906 6
1907 22
1908 10
1909 33
1910 3
1911 19
1912 ?
* * * * * *

OF 0.S. U.
Ohio State
0
0
0
0
0
6
0
0
0
6
6
3
0
* * * *

W. M. Johnston Chosen for
Make Plans for the
Year.,

Place;

At the initial meeting for the year
of the Corda Fratres Cosmopolitan
club last night, W, McKean Johnston,
'13, was elected secretary of corres-
pondence.
The club formulated plans to hold
entertainments and smokers through-
out the year, and the membership will
be canvassed by an entertainment
committee for material to present a
number of novel shows, probably at
the Michigan Union, during the sem-
ester..
A Michigan number of the Cosmo-
politan Student the official publica-
tion of the Corda Fratres Association
of Cosmopolitan clubs, will be edited
by a staff appointed from the mem-
bership of the local chapter, and will
make its appearance in November.

Class Game Postponed to Tuesday.
Owing to the idiosyncracies of Jup.
Pluvius the game between the junior
and soph. lits scheduled for yesterday,
had to be postponed until next Tues-
day afternoon.
FEDERATION OF
ALL UNION
IS PLANNED

** * * * * * * * * * *
* HEALTH TEESUS 61tl GERMS.
* Below is the list of boarding *
* houses using boiled water, re- *
* vised up to date. If your board- *
* ing house is not in this list yet *
* keep on asking until the keeper *
* of your eatingplace serves you *
* with boiled water. *
* McCain's, Green's,Swartout's, *
* Hurlbuart's, Wuerth's, Chubb's, *
* Tuttle's, Cutting Cafe,, Pretty- *
* man's, Linda Vista, Benjamin's, *
* Walker's, The Pines, Paris Cafe, *
* Brennan's,Lumbert's, Freeman's, *
* Merkel's, Club Lunch Room, *
* Cobb's, Wolverine, King's, Chap- *
* man's, Park's, McKay's, Dakin *
* House, Ottmer's, Campus Point *
* Cafe, Kidd's, *
* * * .-* * * * * * * * *
"JACK THE PEEPER" DISAPPEARS
No Trace of the Prowler Has Beeen
Found by the Police.'
"Jack the Peeper" has disappeared.
No, trace of the prowler has been re-
ported to police headquarters since
the first report was published in The
Michigan Daily..
At his last appearance, the peeper
was almost caught attacking a young
girl on Fourth avenue,but her screams
frightened him away just in time to
avoid capture.
The description of the prowler that
was given to the police department
was too meager to allow a general
search for the miscreant, but the en-
tire force was warned to be constant-
ly on the lookout. This seems to have
been sufficient, as nothing further has
been learned concerning the man.

PBEGIN ON 1913

FOUR CLASSES

UNION OPE

INDIANA UNIVERSITY UNION
LAUNCHES MOVEMENT TO LEA.
GUE ALL UNIVERSITY UNIONS
FOR NATIONAL COOPERATION.
WILL BOOST EVERY UNION.

HOLD ELECTION
OFOFFICERS$
NO EVIDENCE OF "PEANUT POLI-
TICS" IS SHOWN: FRESH LITS
DECIDE TO FOLLOW STEP OF UP-
'PERCLASSMEN.
OTHER ELECTIONS TODAY.

Scheme is Favored by Presidents
Wisconisin and Illinois
Unions.

of I J.r

J. Kenedy Chosen to Lead Senior
Laws and E. T. Lazear Senior
Engineers.

MUCH

ROOTING IS EXPECTED.

Approximately 500 tickets for the
O. S. U. game were sold at the Ath-
letic association office at a late hour
last night, which assured that the spe-
cial train which was to leave Ann Ar-
bor at 7:00 o'clock this morning for
Columbus, would be loaded with en-
thusiastic Michigan rooters.
In spite of the threatening weather
yesterday a constant stream of stu-
dents poured into the office of the
Athletic association, to procure the
tickets for the O. S. U. game. Of the
500 tickets sold, nearly 100 were to
women of the university, so that not
only were the male rooters expected
to cheer the Wolverine eleven to victo-
ry, but the members of the fair sex
were counted upon to lend their mor-
al support to the team if not their act-
ual lung power.
"Whitey" Otis, Michigan's cheer
leader was seen traveling toward the
Ann Arbor depot at an early hour this
morning, carrying his big Maize and
Blue megaphone with which to direct
the activities of the Michigan rooting
contingent. Otis and his several as-
sistants plan to give the O. S. U. stu-
dentsa proper demonstration of true
Michigan spirit and from the enthu-
siasm which prevailed about State
street last night, it appeared that he
will have no trouble when he marches
out in front of the O. S. U. bleachers
this afternoon.
ENGINEERING SOCIETY
HOLDS ANNUAL BANQUET
Two hundred engineers ate and sang
and smoked at the annual engineering
society smoker held in the new en-
gineering building last night. Music
by the engineers in the mandolin club,
talks by Professors Riggs, Johnston,
Zowski, Bird, and King, with "Billy"
Williams giving special music and
"Eddie" Wilgus telling special stories
made up the basis of the formal pro-
gram, over which Harold McGee pre-
sided. Cider, apples, dough-nuts,
pretzels, and cigarettes were served in
the society room after the program in

To league all the present university
Unions together and secure national co
operation in founding others through-
out the country is the aim of a move-
ment launched at the Indiana Univer-
sity Union last week. The scheme,
proposed by -the board of directors
of that Union was received with great
enthusiasm at a mass meeting of the
members, and was unanimously en-
dorsed.
This is believed to be the last thing
necessary to "boost" the Unions every-
where, for it is planned that such a
federation will bring the students of
the various universities and colleges
closer together in working for a com-
mon purpose. To secure uniform or-
ganization and regulation, they plan
to unite the Unions which now exist
at North Dakota, Brown, Pennsyl-
vania, Illinois, Chicago, Wyoming,
Harvard, Wisconisin, Indiana and
Michigan, into a national federation,
which will make for a stronger nation-
al feeling among the students of each,
as well as arousing a spirit of co-
operation among alumni everywhere
in the Uiion movement.
It is said that the scheme had al-
ready been contemplated by several
universities, although Indiana is the
first to take action on it, and thus
far the plans have met with nothing
but approval.
"If a consolidation of Unions in
American universities will make a bet-
ter Union here at Wisconsin, I am
highly in favor of the plan," said
President Chester Wells of the Wis-
consin Union. "We are primarily in-
terested in the best interests of our
Union and Wisconisin students."
The plan was also warmly endorsed
by President J. H. Checkley of the
Illinois Union.The opinion there was
that each Union would thus benefit by
the experiences of the others in re-
gard to organization, raising money,
and general Union policy. Correspond-
ence would be instituted between the
different Unions and in that way, and
by congresses of delegates from all of
the federated Unions much would be
gained mutually in discussing phases
of Union life and outlining policies.
Educational Club Meets Monday.
The first regular meeting of the
Educational club will be held Monday
evening at 7:00 p. m. In room 105 Tap-
pan hall. Dean Karl Guthe, of the
Graduate school, will speak, All who
are interested in educational work
are invited to attend.

On account of the trip to Columbus,
elections in several of the clases were
held yesterday afternoon. There was
no evidence of so-called "peanut poli-
tics," and- with few exceptions, the
elections were characterized by com-
yaratively little excitement and medio-
cre interest. Elections in other
classes will be held today and at-var-
ious times next week. The fresh lits
held nominations yesterday afternoon
and started their political career by
deciding. upon clean politics, following
the step taken by upperclassmen. Fol-
lowing are the election results by
classes:
Senior laws: president, J. J. Ken-
nedy; secretary, J. R. Conley; treas-
urer, Clare Retan; baseball manager,
V. G. Wahlheter; basketball manager,
J. A. Lyons, track manager, Lee Ra-
baut; oratorical delegate, E.E. Penzel;
sergeant-at-arms, R. J. Simmons. For
the office of vice-president, W. T. Bie
received 68 votes, and J. L. McDowell
77, and under the class constitution,
another vote will be necessary, as
neither received a majority.
Senior engineers: president, E. T.
Lazear; vice-president, no election;
secretary, R. R. McMath; treasurer,
L. 0. Waite; track manager, F. L.
Weaver; basketball manager, C. L.
Snyder; baseball manager, T. F. Mc-
Givney.
Senior Homeop: president, William
Granley; vice-president, Judson king;
treasurer, 0. W. Pickard; secretary,
F. R. Loomis; historian, F. F. Fel-
lows.
Junior Medic: president, Joseph El-
liott; vice-president, Martha Madtson;
secretary, Milton Shaw; treasurer,
Bryce Miller; basketball manager,
John Lavan; baseball manager, Henry
Wenner; track manager, Leslie Betts-
ford; medical representatives, T. O..
Gilbert, and J. W. Brown; honor com-
mittee, H. D. Barss, F. T. Munson, Jos-
eph Elliott, T. C. Anderson, Francis
Sinear.-
The fresh lits and homeops nomi-
nated today as follows:
Fresh lit president, O.R. Deahl, W.
M. Brucker, G. W. Lambert, H. Pel-
ham; vice-president, Martha Col-
bourne, Emma Rhodelmal; secretary,
Meree Curry, M. Haag Greybill and
Mathews; treasurer, C. M. Toohey,
Mickelson, R. Munter and Paul Gil-
lette; football manager, E. E: Eady,
Ufer, and Bender, baseball manager,
J. Hanna and Robert Stuart; basket-
ball manager, F. P. Surgenor; wom-
en's basketball, G. Correy and E. Sar-
neant; track manager, manager, Mar-
(Continued on page four.)

COMEDY CLUB PLANS
FOR YEAR'S PLAY
"Money," Sir Bulwer Lytton's Comedy
Will Be Given T'his
Year.
MANY OLD PLAYERS ARE BACK.
Earnest preparation is now afoot
for the finding of material to take the
roles in "Money," Sir Bulwer Lytton's
comedy, which the Comedy club has
chosen to produce this year. Tryouts
will begin under the direction of Pro-
fessor L. A. Strauss of the English de-
partmerit and a committee chosen
from the Comedy club, They will be
held in Sarah Caswell Angell hall
Thursday at 4:00 o'clock and will be
conducted on subsequent days it the
turnout justifies it.
"Money," is one of the master farc-
es of Sir Bulwer Lytton and dates to
the time of 1840. As a comedy of man-
ners of that period it satirizes the
lust of gold, and 'the resulting intrig-
ues.
4 This play was presented two years
ago by an all star cast on the occas-
ion of the coronation of the English
king. Detailed information regarding
the costuming of the production has
been secured by the management of
the Comedy club, and fac-similes of
these costumes will be used by the
cast this year. Arrangements are al-
ready, afoot for the, securing of the
necessary and appropriate scenery for
the settings of the play, and books
have been ordered which are expected
to be in the hands of the prospective
'cast within two weeks' time.
Mr. Bert St. John, the favorite
Detroit coach, will take charge of the
production, and work will be begun
as soon as the different parts can be
assigned.
Prospects for the year are especi-
ally rosy. Among the old players who
have starred on the local boards, are
Isabelle Rizer, Mary Drue, and
Marguerite Stanley, Dion Birney, Dav-
id Cohn, Donald Kiskadden, Clay Wil-
ber, and John Syverson.
The club will feel the absence of
Arthur G. Cohen, the promising Thes-
pian who left college last year, and
who is now engaged by the Jack Bar-
rymore Co., in a tour of the United
States.
Union Adds Ten More Members.
Michigan Union membership figures
reached 2,051 esterday, 10 men having
reached 2,051 yesterday, 10 men having

GENERAL MEETINGFOR ALL TR
OUT'S, CAST AND CHORUS, ;
CALLED FOR WEDNESDAY E
ENING.
TO USE TWO CHORUSE
Two Groups to be Chosen, One f
D)ancing Ability and Other
for Singing.
Although the next Michigan Uni
opera will not be presented un
March, active preparations for 1
staging have already been commenc
by General Chairman Philip Fletch
'13E, and his corps of assistants.
general meeting of all men intendi:
to try opt for the cast and chorus h
been called for next Wednesday,
7:00 o'clock at the Union, and at t
time the new system of try-outs w
be explained, and the general orga
ization of the opera set forth.
The 1913 Union opera will be a r
record-breaker, if time and repeat
rehearsing can bring about this+r
sult. Those in charge are determin
to make good use of the months 1
tween now and March, and a perfe
ed system of try-outs will be empk
ed to insure the. best possible se
tion from the wealth of operatic t
ent on the campus.
Will Use Two Chorses.
For the first time in the history
the Union operas, two sets of chorw
will be used this year. The men
the first group will not be required
have especial vocal ability but will
selected on the basis of their nimb
nes in dancing out the figures whi
are to be a feature of this year's p
formance. The second group will
chosen for their talent in singing, a
it is expected that a great majority
this chorus will be composed of g)
club men, who on account of the d
of the presentation, will be able
try out without interfering with th
organization work.
There will be places for 40 men
the dancing chorus, and all stude
having ability in this direction a
urged to atteyd nthe meeting at t
Union next Wednesday. The prelir
nary work will be light, and the a
tual rehearsing will not begin u)
after Christmas.
Try-outs Will be Extended.
Together with a new system of pi(
ing chorus-men, there will be instit
ed a unique method of assigning I
speaking parts. Candidates for th
positions will be given an opportun
to show their ability before the Mim
and will not be picked merely afte
tryout in which the chief requirem
is an ability to read a portion of i
book in a satisfactory manner,
heretofore. Final selections for I
principal parts will only be made af
extended tryouts.
All music for the 1913 opera m
be submitted to the . comimttee
charge by next Monday. Practica
all of the music has been writen
five men chosen for that work i
Spring, but many composers are eli
ble to hand in melodies provided t
material is in by the specified date,
EXTRA UNION' MEMBERSHIP
DANCE IS WELL ATTEND:
Fifty couples attended the ex
membership dance at the Union 1
evening. The committee in charge
the party was: Bernard Fallon,
chairman; J. Austin Otto, '13E, f
George Caulkins, '13.
All tickets for the regular dance
night have been sold. The commit
for tonight is, Hal Talmadge,
chairman; Harold Williamson, '1
and Milton Shaw, '14M

Alpha Nu Welcomes Freshmen.
Alpha Nu debating society will m
tonight at 7:30 in room M, on
fourth floor of University hall,
invitation is extended to freshmen a
all who may be interested in pul
speaking to attend the meeting.
m bers nf the unsty a ered

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