100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 14, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ai~
j3

MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

W '
i '

higan

Daily

M

READ DAILY BY
5,000 STUDENTS.

i

KIIL, No. 159 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 1913. PRICE FIVE CENTS

IRNELL WILL
ACE WEAKENED
MICHIGAN NINE

(

I THE WEATHER MAN

s
1
rai

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Wednesday
Lill.

rines Will Take Field For
Home Game Before Trip
Withl Much Battered
Lineup.

Last

ACH RICKEY MAY SEND
SISLER TO WORK ON MOUMD
ained Tendon Will Probably Keep
Captain Joe Bell on
Bench.
[ichigan has one more home base-
1 game before starting the trip that
1 take the Varsity first to M. A. C.
Saturday, and then on a week's trip
)ugh the east. Cornell's baseball
s will furnish the opposition for
Wolverines, and the game will be
;ed on the Ferry field diamond at
5 o'clock this afternoon.
he Varsity will go into the game
h a battle front bearing many
med and wounded. In fact it is
emely improbable that anything
the full strength of the Wolver-
nine will be represented when
key's proteges take the field pre-
atory to entertaining the Cornell'
amen in the first inning.
bout the only piece of joyful news
nected with the game is the strong
icion that Sisler will pitch. Mich-
1 is out to defeat Cornell to avenge
track beating administered by the

Uiverit bse rvato--Tuesday,
7:00 p.in., temperature 56.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
72.8; minimum temperature 24 hours'
preceding, 50.2; average wind velocity,
9 miles per hour.
MICIIAMUIA WILL HIT TRAIL
IN ANNUAL "ROPE IN,'TOIDAY.
As the pale face time keeper strikes
six-times, near the setting of today's
sun, Michigamua, the ancient and
most noble tribe, will leave the wig-
wam on the eleventh annual hunt
among the white men on the campus.
Painted, smeared and blanketed the
eighteen Michigamua's will make a
war trail around the campus, first to
sing the war song and give the battle
cry before the lodging of the former
chief of the white men, then to ad-
vance to Tappan Oak and there to hunt
out the chosen from the junior pale-
faces, smoke the pipe and lead back to
the nation's lodge the bucks that will
keep alive the customs of the tribe.'
LEAGUE REST ICTS
CAMPUS ACTIVITIES
By New Ruling, Undergraduate Worn-
en Can Carry Only 12 Points of
Outside Work.
EACH HONOR WILL BE LISTED.
The extent of non-academic activi-

3ig Red" squad at Ithaca, and Sisler
the one best bet to turn the trick, ties which each university woman
pecially as the remainder of the may carry will be restricted under the
ieup is liable to be weak. . new point system adopted by the Wom-
Webber is slated to go behind the en's League to go into effect at the
ate in the game against the Itha-
,s. Baier, it is said, is nursing an opening of the fall term in Septem-
lured hand, owing to his efforts in ber. Each campus honor is listed in
ceiving Sisler for the first time in an official record and a card index
,turday's game with Syracuse. will be kept of all women who attain
In the infield it is probable that the
me will see Pontius on firs't, becausewt h o o ish
>ward's knee is still bothering him, they occupy. No woman will be allow-
cQueen on second, Baker on short ( ed to carry more than ten honor points
d Hughitt guarding the far corner at one time and not more than 12
the diamond. It is said that Mc- points a semester. This plan has
teen is the only man on the infield been accepted by the Women's League,
Wo is not going into the game with having been approved by the non-ath-'
bruised hand. letic committee.
But this is not all the hard luck The object of the League is three-
at the Michigan nine is up against, fold; to more evenly distribute the
ptain Joe Bell may not appear in campus honors, to raise the scholar-
accustomed place in center field ship of the women in general, and to
ing to a strained tendon. Rickey do more efficient work. These non-ac-
.nts him to be at his best on the ademic activities have been rated with
stern trip, and it is -possible that regard to the time required by the
e Michigan leader may not be called office and the regard in which it is
on to participate in today's contest. held on the campus. No one who has
.th Bell out of the running, Duncan- received an E or two D's in the pre-
n, Cory and Quaintance will prob- ceding semestcr may carry more than
ly appear in the gardens. five- points of outside work. A stand-
What Michigan's batting order will ing lower than this will allow the
is a question that even Coach Rick- student to carry only one point of
is undecided about. The change credit. Although eligible women may
the lineup occasioned by the in= carry 12 hours a semester, no one is
ies that the men on the team are entitled to more than 22 hours a year.
rsing, will probably mean an exten-' The card index of those bolding
e change in the batting order. How listed honors will be in charge of a
s change will be worked out is a committee of three women and a memt-
estion. ber of the non-athletic committee, und
shall be under the direct authority of
C 0 MM U N I C A TION, the entire non-athletic board. Activi-
ties once undertaken and recorded
We, the law class of nineteen hun- may be exchanged for others with the
ed and thirteen, of the University permission of Dean Myra B. Jordan
Michigan, having learned with the and the organization from which the
enest sorrow, of the untimely death woman wishes to resign.
our classmate, Alan W. Tull, do In the wake of the presidency of
refore resolve, the Women's League, which heads the
rbat, We bear testimony to his char- list with a count of seven lpoints, are
;er and loyalty as a class-mate an the vice-presidencies of the classes,
end and we deplore this sudden and valued at six points. The leading
expected bereavement as a distinct woman's part in the Comedy 'club
s to our class and to the universi- counts four points.

WORK OVERTIME
PREPARING FOR
ANNUALEXHIBIT
Conruittees in Charge of Exhibition
Will Complete Arrangementt
of Display Booth
Today.
WHISTLES WILL ANNOUNCE
OPENING TOMORRO 1V MORING
Guides Will le on Hand to Explain
Working of Exhibits
to Visitors.
Hammering and sawing is making
the halls of the engineering building
ring with the noise of preparation, as
the committees of the engineering ex-
hibit work overtime in an endeavor
to get all the displays set up on sched-
ule time. Most of the features are
constructed and ready to put in place,
but the actual arrangement of the dis-
play booths has not yet been complet-
ed. Everything will be in place to-
inorrow at 10:00 o'clock, when a series
of blasts from the set of nine whistles
will announce the opening of the first
annual exhibit of the engineering, ar-
chitecture, and forestry departments.
The committees and guides ar pre-
pared to receive and explain the mys-
teries of the different processes to
thousands of visitors. Five thousand
20-page descriptive booklets, explain-
ing the displays and giving a brief
history of the engineering department
will be given to visitors as souvenirs.
Everything is being arranged to give
visitors from out of town, and stu-
dents and members of the faculty from
other departments, a definite idea of
the work accomplished by the engi-
neering department, and at the same
time to give sightseers valuable in-
struction on practical, everyday prob-
lems.
A continuous illustrated lecture on
lumbering and logging will be given
by the forestry department. The chem-
istry department will show a cement
plant in operation, and the whole pro-
cess of making the finished product
will be reproduced, The architecture
exhibit will be replete with sketches
and drawings by different members of
the department; plans of famous sky-
scraffers of the country are promised,
by a New York architectural firm, and
Prof. C. S. Denison's collection of pho-
tographs of wonderful engineering
works will also be on display.
The exposition will run continu-
ously from 10:00 o'clock tomorrow
morning until 10:00 o'clock at night,
if the number of visitors warrant. The
features needing power will not be
run Friday, but the standing features
will be on exhibition until Saturday
afternoon.7
JUNIOR LITS WIN PRIZES
OFFEREID FOR ESSAY CONTEST
Paul B. Blanshard, '14, and Lois
Spraker, '14, received the first and sec-
ond prizes, respectively, offered byt
the Detroit branch of the Colonial
Dames of America, for the best essays
on the attitude of England toward the
African slave trade in 1776. Members
of the junior and senior classes were
eligible for the contest. The prizes1
carried with them awards of $50 and,
$25.

Junior Lits to Hold Arcadia Party.
Junior lits will feature for their last
social .event of the year an "Arcadia
Party" at Barbour gym next Wednes-
day evening from 7:30 to 10:30 o'clock..
The tango will be allowed and in near-
ly every respect the dance will be a'
miniature of the famous Detroit acad-
emy.
Tickets will go on sale tomorrow at,
35 cents each.
Pet Date for Rhodes Examinations.
The next qualifying examinations
for the Rhodes scholarship from Mich-
igan will be held here on Oct. 14 and;
and 15, and will be open to all colleges {
and universities in the state. Those I
w ishing to compete should see Presi-1
lent Harry B. Hutchins. '

PROVIDES PLAN
FOR CHOOSING
CHEERLEADE RS
Student Council Will Issue Call For
Candidates at Once in Order
to Start System
This Year.
FOUR MEN WILL BE CHOSEN
EACH SPRING FROM TRYOUTS

MEN NOMINATED FOR MICH-
IWAN UNION OFFICE S.
Election, Saturday, May 17.
--0-
President
Selden S. Dickenson, '13-'15L.
Louis F. H~aller, '11,'14L.
Maurice C. Myers, '11-'14L.
Vice-President-Lit Dept,
Cyril Quinn, '14.
Robert Sturtevant, '14.
Charles Webber, '14.
Vice-Pres.-Engineering Dept.
Charles A. Crowe, '14E.
George B. Duffield, '14E.
Albert Fletcher, '14E.
Vice-Pres.-Law Dept.
Frank Murphy, '12-'14L.
Maurice Toulirs, '12-'14L.
Vice-Pres.-Medic Dept.
Carl Eberbach, '16M.
Maurice Lohman, '15M.
Vice-Pres.-Combined Dept.
S. Spencer Scott, '14P.
Recording Secretary
Fred Gould, '14.
Werner Schroeder, '14.
Edwin Thurston, '13-'15L.
Faculty Advisers
H. M. Bates.
H. C. Adams.
Reuben Peterson.
* * * * * * * * *

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Approved System Resembles
Now in Use at Other
Schools.

Those

Thomas Orchestra Will Arrive
Morning to Hold
Rehea'sal.

This

The proposed plan for the choosing
of student cheer leaders was passed
by the student council at a meeting
last night. The details of the plan are
similar to systems in use in various
universities throughout the country
and are intended to select men as lead-
ers, who not only have ability, but
who are also popular wih the student
body.'-
According to the details of the plan,
two weeks before spring vacation, the
secretary of the council will publish
in The Michigan Daily a call for vol-
unteers from the junior classes for
cheer leader aspirants. These tryouts
will be instructed in cheer leading
methods for an hour a day for two
weeks by the present cheer leaders.
At the end of this time, a board con-
sisting of the present yell-leaders and
the managers of the various sports,
will'select eight of the candidates to
try out by leading cheers at the base-
ball games and track meets during the
spring.
Four of these eight men will be
chosen as cheer leaders at a general
student election to be held at the same
time as the election of student mem-
bers of the board in control of publi-
cations. The four men chosen will
elect one of their number as head
cheer leader, and the other three will
act as his assistants during the year.
In order to get the new system
started this year, the secretary of the
council has issued a call for candi-
dates to meet this evening at the Un-
ion at 7:00 o'clock The 'nen who will
instruct the aspiring cheer leaders'
this season are Professors Thomas
Trueblood and Richard HollistQr, and
L. M. Otis, '13M.
ANNOUNCE EXAM SCHEDULE l
FOR LITS AND ENGINEERS.1
Program Practically the Same as Last1
Semester; Period to Begin
June 9.
Schedules of examinations for thet
literary and engineering departmentsI
were announced yesterday. The ex-
amination period will begin on Mon-
day, June 9. The program varies1
slightly from that of last semester.
The schedule is as follows:c
Courses with the first recitation of
the week on3
1Monday or Wednesday
At 8 First Wednesday...........9-12f
At 9 Second Wednesday.........2-51
At 10 First Monday.............9-121
At 1 First Thursday...........2-5i
At 2 First Thursday .......... 9-12
At 3 Second Tuesday ....:......9-12I
Monday.
At 11 Second Tuesday ..........2-51
Wednesday.1
At 11 First Tuesday ... . .......9-121
Tuesday or Thursday.
At 8 First Monday.............2-51
At 9 Second Monday .......... 9-12
At 10 First Tuesday.............2-5
At 11 First Friday ............ 9-12
At 1 Second Monday..........2-5
At 2 First Wednesday...........2-5
At 3 First Saturday...........9-12
Friday any hour and E. M. 3.
Second Wednesday ........ 9-121
Saturday any hour1
Second Thursday ..,.........2-5
Any day at 4-6 Second Thursday..9-12i
Drawing 4, 4a, 5a, First Wednesday 2-51
Irregular<

This evening, with the opening con-
cert of the biggest May festival Ann
Arbor has ever witnessed, the doors of
the new Hill auditorium will be open-

ed to
first time

the public for the
e. The two combin-

*
*
*

FEW CONTESTANTS,
TRYOUT FOR TEAM
Enough Underclassmen Do Not Turn
Out For AnIual Spring
Struggles.
CLASSES HOLD "PE" MEETINGS.
At yesterday's weighing-in more
than 100 underclassmen signed up for
the tug-of-war events to be staged
Friday, making a total of more than
500 who will fight across the Huron.
Today is the last day for weighing-in
and more heavyweights are needed to
complete the team. Scarcely half
enough men turned out for the relay
teams at yesterday's tryouts. A large
number of runners are needed from
both freshman and sophomore classes
and Robert L. Mayall who has charge
of the events urges all men of running
ability to be out at the final try-outs
at the fair grounds tomorrow after-
noon from 2:00 to 5:30 o'clock.
Freshmen will hold a mass meet-
ing at 7:00 o'clock tonight in the
west physics lecture room. The meet-
ing will serve as a final "pep" gener-
ator for the struggles and directions
will be given by student councilmen,
Hulbert, Brown, Mayall and Spinning.
Members of upperclasses will be pres-
ent to tell the first year men how con-
tests of the past have been won, and
yells will be practiced.
Sophomores will hold a similar
meeting tomorrow night at the same
time and place. The sophomore motto
of "veni, vidi, vici," circulated on
handbills, will be impressed on class
members.
In the tug-of-war the lightweight
teams will average 135 while the mid-
dleweight team will have an average
of 159 or 160 pounds The heavyweight
class will be comprised of 175-pound
men and heavier. In this year's con-+
test only steady pulling will be allow-
ed and the teams will not be permit-
ted to give a series of jerks and then,
lay down as in previous years. A meet-
ing of the captains will be held at the
Tau Beta Pi house tonight and the
personnel of the teams will be named.
The contests, which were to have been
begun at 3:30 o'clock, have been post-
poned until 4:15 p. m. because of ob-
jection of the faculty.
EXPLANATION OF ACCIDENT
DOES NOT SATISFY CORONER,

ed events .make an epoch in university
history, and from all indications every
one of the five thousand seats will be
occupied.
With the exception of the grading,
the new building and grounds are com-
plete. Evergreens were planted in
groups yesterday at the- sides of the
main entrance, and make a contrast
with th~e imposing white facade, while
within, all is in readiness. For the
festival too, everything is ready. The
Thomas orchestra arrives this morn-
ing, and will rehearse this afternoon
with the Choral Union The artists
will arrive during the day, and visitors
from all over the state are already
coming in numbers.
The present year marks the twenty-
fifth anniversary of Albert A. Stanley's
coming tow the university. In com-
memoration of the event, the Choral
Union will present to the university
a portrait in oil of Mr. Stanley by
Percy Ives. The ceremony will take
place immediately after the "Laus
Deo" for Chorus and orchestra, which
Mr. Stanley has written for the festi-
val. The presentation will be made
by Mr. Hoexter of the engineering de-
partment, a member of the Choral Un-
ion, and Pres. Hutchins will accept
for the university. The portrait will
be hung in the Stearns room of the
auditorium during the festival. Fol-
lowing the ceremony of presentation,
a flashlight picture will be taken from
the stage of the entire audience.
For the concert this evening, Fred-
erick Stock and Albert A. Stanley will
be the conductors, and Mme. Marie
Rappold, of Metropolitan opera fame,
the soloist. The program will be as
follows:
Huldigung's March .......... Wagner
Vorspiel "Meistersinger" .... Wagner
Aria-"Dich Theure Halle" (Tann-
hauser)............... Wagner
Mme. Rappold
Symphony No. 5, C minor, Op. 67..
.................... ,. Beethoven
Allegro con brio; Andante con moto;
Allegro; Finale
Intermission
"Laus Deo" for Chorus and Orches-
tra ............ .. ..A. A. Stanley
Aria-"Ave Maria"........... Brph
Mme. Rappold
Overture-"Academic Festival," Op.
80 ...................... Brahms
LAWS CONSIDER HONOR SYSTEM.

OPEN DOORS OF
AUDITORIUMFOR
MAY FESTIVAL
Oil Painting of Albert A. Stanley to
Ie Presented to University by
Choral Union This
Evening.
M)LE. IIARIE RAPPOLD WILL
APPEAR TOINIGHT AS SOLOIST

Modified

Plan Will be Voted on
This Week.

most respectfully tender
t sympathy to his parents
embers of his family, with
iare a common sorrow,
ase resolutions be spread
ermanent records of our
ublished in The Michigan
at a copy thereof be trans-
e family of the deceased.
E. B. Chaffee.

Catholic Students Give tAiual Iance
Encouraged by the demand for tick-
ets for the annual dance of the Catho-
lic Student's club which will be held
at the Michigan Union Friday May 16,
the committee in charge has decided
to add six feature dances to the pro-
gram. Tickets sell for $2.00, and may
be obtained from C. H. Hippler, '14L,
S. St. Amour, '14E, G. Sewell, '14E,
or at Quarry's. The chaperones are
Mr. W. A. McLaughlin, of the FrenchI
denartient, and Mr. and Mrs. William

Jury

is Impaneled and Police
Carry on a Further
Investigation.

Will

Honor committees of the three
classes in the law department at their
meeting yesterday afternoon voted
to give all possible publicity to the de-
partmental plan of honor system
which they expect to present to their*
classes next week for ratification.
Copies of the plan will be printed and
distributed to the different sections
early next week, and a vote will be
taken on it in class meetings the lat-
ter part of the week.
A sub-committee was appointed
which will draw up proposed
modifications of the plan sub-
mitted by the boards of class
presidents, and change ' it to fit
the needs of the law department. The
outline will then be submitted to the
clasess as adopted by the committees.
This will be its final form, which will
be printed for general distribution.

"In spite of the assertion of Frank
Landrey who claims to have seen Alan
W. Tull killed, we are not certain as
to the exact nature of the death. The
theory does not explain the missing
purse," said Coroner J. W. Rothacher
of Wayne county last night. He im-
paneled a: jury yesterday and further
investigation is in charge of the High-
(Continued on page 2.)

First Friday ....... ...........
First Saturday...............
Second Thursday ........

2-5
2-5
2-5

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan