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May 13, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-13

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READ DAILY BYj
5,04 STUDENTS.

158.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

DEATH

SENIOR LAW

PUZZLES POLICE'
oner's Inquest Fails to Explain
Fatal Injuries Received by
A. W. Tull in Detroit
Saturday Night.
ifGEDY CLOSES ROMANCE
OF MANY YEARS' STANDING.
horities Believe Nan May Have
seen Thrdwn While Attempting
to Board Street Car.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Tuesday,
fair and cooler.
University Observatory- Monday,
7:00 p.in., temperature 62.0; maximum
temperature 24 hours preceding, 65.1;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding 38.1; average wind velocity 10
miles per hour; precipitation, trace.
RIDDLE OF SILENT SPHINX
READ BY TEN SOPHOMORES.
Honorary Junior Society Conducts
Novitiates Over Hot Sands
of Sahara.
Ten staunch and sturdy sophomores
crossed the burning sands of the Saha-

Detroit police and Coroner J. W. ra yesterday,"and were admitted to the
Rothacher of Wayne county are still innermost secrets of Sphinx, the hon-
puzzled by the death of Alan W. Tull, orary junior lit society. A banquet at
which occurred in Detroit Sunday the Union followed the mummification
morning. Coroner Rothacher said last at which "Howdy" Seward presided,
night that there is a possibility of Tull and Frank Murphy, '12-'14L, Waldo
having been thrown in an attempt to Fellows, '14, Prof. C. P. Wagner, "Lar-
board a moving car while a slight clue ry" Clayton, '15, "Pat" Koontz, '14,
of an automobile accident was discov- and "Cy" Quinn, '14, responded to
ered in yesterday's inquest. The death toasts.
ends a romance of more than 15 years. The men who were taken in last
Tull left his fiancee, Miss Josephine night are "Fritz" Bade, "Jack" Bruce,
B. Davy, at 92 Connecticut avenue at "Larry" Clayton, "Ned" Crane, "Cun-
10:30 o'clock Saturday night intend- ny" Cunninghamn, "Bill" Davidson,
ing to return to Ann Arbor on the "Gee" Gault, "Capt." Jenks, "Touch",
11:00 o'clock interurban car. At about Johnston, and "Howdy" Marsh.
10:50 o'clock he was found lying un-
conscious across the track at the cor-M
ner of Woodward and Connecticut ave- MAY FESTIVAL TO
nues by the motornman on the north-h fft'UA
bound car.hen found his pocket- BEGIN TOMORR W
book containing $35.00 was missing.
The intervening facts have been ex-
plained by various theories. Some be- New Hill Auditorim Will be Opened
lieve that he was the victin of an auto-to General Public For
mobile accident, while others thinksI First Time.
that he was attacked by thugs. Most
of Tull's friends, however, believe he'
was thrown in an attempt to board a
Wstoodward car. When the Thomas orchestra plays
When found, the skull was fractured the opening strain of Wagner's Vors-
with a gash above the left eye. The piel to the "Meistersinger" in Hill au-
left side of the overcoat was badly ditorium tomorrow evening, there will
torn but no bones were broken. Friends be inaugurated the greatest of all the
of Tull believe that the pocketbook eiugrtdhegatsofalhe
of tuake wle thatftepoetbookm-20 May music-fests Ann Arbor has had.
was taken while officers were sum-
moning the patrol. In attempting to The program offered and the list of
board a south bound car, Tull would contributing artists surpass those of
naturally have been thrown on his left any previous festival; and the beau-
side in the rear of the car and could tiful new auditorium, with its great
have easily stumbled to the parallel seating capacity, will furnish a fitting
track where he was found later. He setting for the enlarged festival.
_ Madame Ernestine Schumann-Heink,
because she is a world-renowned sing-
rQer and one of Ann Arbor's prime favor-
ites, easily heads the list of artists. She
will sing in the Verdi "Requiem" on
Thursday evening, and is the soloist
in the Friday afternoon concert. Mme.
1Marie Rappold makes her first appear-
ance In Ann Arbox, but with an eclat

3
t
3
r
X

W1 "I""FEATU R I
CAMPUS r:O
Powerful Searchlight to Flash From
Engineering Building aid Big
Electric Sign to Hang
at Arcl)ay.
IRRIGATION SYSTEM1 WILL
BE PRODUCED IN )MINIATURE
Local Wireless Station to I)ispatch
Radiograms Free of Charge
For Visitors.
One thousand "University of Mich-'
igan Radiogram Blanks" have been
printed especially for the engineering
exhibit Thursday, with which wireless
messages will be sent free of charge
for all visitors to Detroit and neigh-
boring cities having wireless stations.
Arrangements have been made with
the Marconi company to deliver the
messages promptly at their destina-
tion point.
A powerful searchlight constructed
by the electrical department will flash
over the city and surrounding country
tomorrow night from the top of the en-
gineering building. A big electrical
sign advertising the exhibit wil be
hung over the engineering arch. The
; section gang" is making good prog-
ress laying the 100 feet of track be-
tween the economics and engineering
buildings, on which the electrical en-
gine will be run. A set of nine whis-
ties, varying in size from a willow-
whistle to an ocean steamer variety,
has been received from Harvey and
Son, of Detroit. Efforts are being
made to tune the pipes, but as they
make so much noise, the attempt will
probably be abandoned, and they will
be blown as they are.
One of the features of the engineer-
ing exhibit will be an irrigation ditch
and power plant constructed under the
supervision of Prof. H. W. King. On
a space 14 feet square, streams will
be shown running down mountain sid-
es, with big dams, models of the fam-
ous Roosevelt structure, storing the
water in reservoirs, after which it runs
through spillways, funishes power for
miniature power plants, and then
spreads itself out over the plains for
irrigation.
Canoeists will be given expert ad-£
vice on the problems of canoeing by
the marine department, which has ap-
pointed a special committee to answer
any questions concerning the best
models for safety and speed. A model

SPRING GAMES,
ARE SELECTED
Underelsmen Show Great Ineres
In Comin: Conesst ; ore Than
400 Weigh in For Tug of
Wr3ar enj.s
TRYOUTS FOR RELAYS, ILL
BE IELD THS AFTERNOON.
Freshmen amd Sophomores Plan Mass
Mleetings for Wednesday and
Thursday 'ights.
Captains for spring contest events
scheduled for Friday and Saturday
were elected at class meetings yester-
day, and at a meting of the captains
with the officials a the Michigan Union
last night, general pl:ans for the inter-
class strugiles were outlined. At the
weighing-in :or the tug-of-war yeter-
day afternon 425 Lne nsigned up. The
final weighig for both freshmen and
sophomore omuns will be held at Wat-
erian gym this afternoon fron 1:00
to 5:30 o'clck.
At yesterday's pollings, fresh lits
chose Joseph .Fee as lightweight tg
of-war captain, George I. Furphy as
second relay captain, and Clayton C.
tochni as push ball exeutive. 0. A.
Brines was picked by fresh pharmics
as third relay captain. Frs eng-
neers will elect hriavy and middle-
weight tug-of-war captains and first
relay captain at the. freshman asse-i
bly tomorrow morning.
Soph lits chose 'William Davidson as
lightweight tug-of-war captan, Fran-
cis F. Mecg imney for the second relay,
and Ernest w. Crane for the third re-
lay. Seconc year engineers picked
:lbe T,. 2 ;in asicaptain for the
middleweight tug-of-war, and Jame
E,1 h-ughes for the first relay. Bernice
E3. Champe was chosen by fresh dents
as light weight tug-of-war captain.
Push ball captain will be elected by
L915 laws.
George F. Brown, who has charge of
the tug-of-war, was optimistic after
yesterday's weighing-in. The relays
are in charge of Robert L. Mayall,
13L, who says that prospects are
bright for son.e fast teams. The try-
outs will be held today and Thursday
from 2:00 to 5:30 o'clock at the fair-
grounds. All underlassmen who ha
any running ability are urged to bei
out.
Fresh classes will hold a nas meet-
ing at the west physics-lecture room
tomorrow night at 7:00 o'clock and
sophonores will hold a similar gath-<
ering Thursday night in the same
place.
At the meeting last night it was de-
cided to prohibit the use of shoes with
mxetal cleats. I the tun-of-war the
pennant will go to the captain of theI
winning heavy wvcght teamn.
ldSi s 1-IRE '.Wl1MEN 0
VEINi, Iii INITIATE SIXTEEN
Four sophom cres and 12 freshmen
were initiated into the sophomore
women's section of te iDcutscher '- Y
rein at the meeting last night at the
club rooms in Univesity hall. The
sophomores are:
Annie WVilians, E+:ilth Mioiles, Clara
Roe, and Grace Maurquedant. The
freshmen, who will form the neucleus
for a new sophomore section next year
are, Alice Lloyd; Florence Gerber, Mar-

garet Haag, Beatrice Lambrecht, Mar-
guerite Bogenrieder, Adele Beyer, Ruth
Elliott, Leah Scheerin, Mildred Mada-
lie, Alta iHeffelbower and Ethel
Mushkin.+

MN NOMINATEi) FOR MICH-
ITAN UNION OFFICES.
"i"cctiou, Saturday, May 17.

*: * * * * *

-0-.

*

* * *

President
: Selden S. Dickenson, '13-'15L.
' Louis F. l aller, '11,'14L. *
Maurice C. Myers, '11,'13L. *
Right side. Main floor. Call Mech-
t :sldeo see-rbo'xao'iIr!g,
r Vice-President-Lit Dept.
* Cyril Quinn, '14.
* Robert Sturtevant, '14. *
* Charles Webber, '14. *
-I ice-Pres. --Engineering Dept.
* Charles A. Crowe, '14E. *
* George B. Duffield, '14E. *
* Albert Fletcher, '14E. *
Vice-Pres.-Law Dept.
Frank Murphy, '12-'14L. *
Maurice toulme, '12-'14L.
Vice. ties.-Medie Dept.
* Carl Eberbach, '16M. *
* Maurice Lohman, '15M.
V ice-Pres.- Combined Dept. *
S. Spencer Scott, '14P. *
Recording Secretary
n: Fred Gould, '14.
,erner Schroeder, '14.
dwin l urston, '13-'1L.
- Fsaculty Adyisers*
* 1 M. Bates. *
S1H. C. Adams. *
* Reuben Peterson. *
-* * * * * * * * * * *
CAP NIGHT PLANS
NlEAR COMPLETION

*
*
*
*
*
*

OPERA CHORUS
REDUCED FOR
CHICAGO TRIP
Mediums and Eight Other Performers
Ehiijmated at First
Rehearsal Held
Last Night.
BLACK FRIAR'S PRODUCTION
INCITES PLAYERS TO ACTION
Entire Performance With Exception of
Orchestra Will Be Staged
Tonight.
Men in the medium chorus of "Con-
trarie Mary," as well as eight other
chorusmen, will not make the trip to
Chicago with the Union opera May 24.
The cuts were made last night at the
first rehearsal held in preparation for
the Chicago performance.
A second practice has been called for
7:00 o'clock this evening, at the Union,
at which time all men who were una-
ble to be present last night on account
of the Choral Union- rehearsal will be
required to be in attendance.The mem-
bers of the cast and chorus will re-
hearse practically the entire perform-
ance, but the orchestra will be given
a respite in preparation for next
week's extended rehearsals.
Bert St. John, director of the opera,
conducted last night's practice session,
and found his proteges nearly as pro-
ficient as they were two months ago.
A special effort will be made to polish
the performance into creditable form,
because the Michigan show will take
place in Chicago only two weeks after
the Black Friar's production, and the
management desires to outdo the Win-
dy City thespians.
SOCIALIST TO SPEAK ON
"MEN VS. MONEY" TONIGHT
Dr. Algernon Sidney Crapsey, a
Episcopalian minister for more than
30 years until he was ex-communicat-
ed from the church in 1907 on the
grounds of heresy, will speak in New-
berry hall tonight at 5:40 o'clock on

_ - -

of Freshmnien to Dignities
Sophonioehiod, May 23, Wfill
EoSpectacular.

of

which comes of her great successes engine will be shown in action, which
with the Metropolitan opera company. .an be fastened to either a rowboat or
She will sing several arias in the open- canoe by simply clamping it to the
ing Wednesday evening concert. Sig- stern, thus converting the boat into a
nor Pasquale Amato is another of the launch in a few minutes time.
Metropolitan stars, and will display Visitors will be allowed to ride on
his wonderful baritone voice in some the travelling truck which spans the
of his famous arias in the Friday ev- 300 foot naval tank, so they can see
ening, the "popular," concert. And how the resistance of the various boat
then there are Lambert Murphy, Flor- models is measured. The process of
ence Hinkle, Henri Scott, Rosalie making the model pariffin 10 foot
Wirthlin, and William Hinshaw, who boats, with which experiments in the
are all artists of high rank, and will marine tank are made, will be shown
add much to the enjoyment and fame from beginning to end. The use of a
of the festival. They will sing in the gyroscope for steadying a boat will
Thursday and Saturday evening con- also be shown.
certs, which are given over to Verdi Everyone is invited to the exhibit.
and Wagner. Special invitations to fraternities, sor-
With but two more rehearsals the orites and clubs were sent merely to
Choral Union will be ready to take emphasize the importance of the show,
part in the festival. The Thomas or- and were not sent out with the idea
chestra will arrive Wednesday morn- that those who were specially invited
ing, and in the afternoon at 2:30 would be allowed to attend.
o'clock a joint rehearsal will be held -in
Hill auditorium. Prof. Hildner Lectures hi Ypsilanti.
At the Wednesday afternoon rehear- Prof. J. A. C. Hildner of the Ger-
sal, librettos of the festival will be man department delivered a lecture
given to the members of the chorus. last night before the Business Men's
Any absent from this rehearsal will club of Ypsilanti on "German and
not receive librettos. t. American Cities."

lR T 5 USE OF SLEEPY HOLLOW
At a meeting of the cap night com-
rmittee of 27 sophomores at the Michi-
gan Union last night it was decided to
make the annual event more spectac-
ular than ever before for the benefit
of the visitors who will be here for
the interscholastic games. The cele-
bration will be held Friday evening,
May 23, and in general the plans are
the same as last year including the
march to Sleepy Hollow from the
camn)us. The way will be lighted as
before with red lights.
At the meeting last night R. E. Wol-
eslagel, '13D, who is in charge of bon-
tre arrangements divided the commit-
tee into three squads of nine members
each to solicit merchants for boxes.
'he city has been divided into three
districts and a complete canvass will
be made. Permission has been receiv--
.xd from the police for merchants to
save boxes, contrary to the city ordi-
nace and the Women's League has
granted official permission to use
Sleepy Hollow.
Arrangements for speakers, yellmas-
ter, and songs are in charge of John I.
Lippincott, '14, and the program will
be completed this week.
A LtJA1) WORK DISCUSSED
BY CALIFORNIA PROFESSOR'
Prof. Stuart Daggett, of the econom-
ics department of the University of
Galifornia, delivered his first lecture
to the class in economics 2, yesterday
atcernoon. His subject was "The Na-
ture of the Railroad Business." The
second and third lectures will be giv-
en tomorrow and Friday afternoon at
2:00 o'clock in the economics lecture
room. The subject of the second lec-
ture will be, "Discrimination in the
Railway Business." The subject of the
third and last lecture will be "The
Work of the Interstate Commerce
Commission.

DR.

A e

sm

E Y

CONSTRSCTIVE
SOCIALISM
NEWBERRY HALL
TONIGHT 8:00

;a

L EONENDG OC
A 1.ECTURE ON THE IMPENDING. SOCIAL. RECONSTRUCTION,

m

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