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May 11, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

The

Aahi

i)aA* ply

1

READ DAILY BY
5,000 STUDENTS.-

Vol. XXIII, No. 157. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 11, 1913. PRICE FIVE CENT

" 1

METHODISTS
SMOTHERED IN
COME-BACK' 14-1i
Recast Michigan Team Treats Orange-
men Roughly, Finding De Silva
Iof Up to Standard and
Garner 13 Safeties.
SISLER PITCHES SUPERBLY
WHIFFING 16 IN 7 INNINGS.
Good Exhibition at Receiving End Is
Given by Baer in His
First Game.
. The recast Michigan team tried a
comeback at Syracuse yesterday and
smothered the Methodists to the tune
of 14 to 1, never hesitating in the scor-
ing and holding the Oranigemen safe
at all times. It was not a particularly
interesting game owing to its lopsided
outcome but the swatting that took
place and the pitching of Sisler fur-
nished enough excitement to over-
come the arctic breezes. The port side
strike-out king pitched for seven in-
nings and whiffed sixteen of the visit-
ors, allowing them three hits and one

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor.-Suniday,
fair and warmer.
University Observatory- Saturday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 46.9; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
51.1; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 30.0; average wind velocity,
7 miles per hour.
ALL-FRESH TENNIS TEAM
EASILY DEFEATS ALBION.

UNDERLASSES
PREPARE FOR
Rallies Will Be Held by Fresh and
Sophs in Order to Bring Out
Enthusiasm For Spring
Contests.
TUG-OF-WAR PARTICIPANTS
WILL WEIGH IN TOMORROW.

Michigan's All-Fresh tennis team
returned victorious from their match
with Albion, College yesterday. The
collegians did not tally a set either
in single or in doubles during the
match.
The scores for the singles were
6-3, 6-2, 6-2; in the doubles 6-4,
6-4.
Musical Numbers to Be Gien at Union
Musical numbers by Frank Wheeler,
'15E, LeRoy Scanlan, '16, Henry Bal-
lard, '13D, Herbert Lautman, '13L,
with Selden Dickinson, '13-'15L, as
accompanist, will comprise the regular
afternoon program at the Union today.
The affair will begin at 3:00 o'clock.
PREPARE CAST OF'

Classes to Meet Monday to Elect
tains and Organize Plan
of Action.

Cap.

score.
The game was carded Jo be a pitch-
ers' duel and Sisler played his part
well, but De Silva, Syracuse's best bet,
was not up to the standard and he was
roughly treated. Thirteen safeties
were made off him and five of themj
were for extra bases, Duncanson lead-
ing with a circuit breaker. Baer
caught his first game for Michigan and
gave a good exhibition. He was a lit-
tle nervous in spots and had a couple
of slips but he handled Sisler well
and caused many a worrying fan to
breathe a sigh of relief to think that
the backstop problem was not impos-
sible to solve.
The Wolverine team went into ac-
tion with a scrambled lineup, Dun-
canson playing in the outfield, How-
ard back on the first station, and Baer
catching. Also the batti g order got a
shaking Bell Ieading off and
McQueen taking the third po-
sition on the - list. The shake-
up had its effect for the hitting was
not only consistent but very timely,
McQueen justifying his position by
garnering three hits. Aside from two
or three slips, the fielding was clean
although Sisler allowed the ball
to be hit but little. But there was bet-
ter work all' around than on Thurs-
day and the team had a smoother ap-
pearing mechanical style.
Aside from the pitching of Sisler and
the heavy batting of Michigan there
was little to the game. With a good
break of luck Sisler would have shut
them out but the viistors combined
two lucky hits with an error and saved
their side of the score board from
disgrace. The left hander seemed to
let himself out a little more than at
any time previous and was pitching
ball that would win any game. Par-
ticularly good was the way he held
runners to the bag. De Silva didn't
get away at all, Michigan swatting
him all during the game and hitting
the ball hard. Of course the eight
Syracuse errors had a large part to
play in the big total but Michigan
would have won without that aid. The
work of the Syracuse team was in con-
trast with their appearance Thursday
and evidently the three games in a row
had a deleterious effect.
The visitors scored their lone coun-
ter in the seventh while Michigan was
blanked in only two rounds, the fifth
and seventh. In all the other innings
they tallied from one to four runs,
taking advantage of all the openings
(Continued on page 2.)

r

OPERA FOR TRIPI

"Contrarie Mary" to Rehearse
For Presentation in
Chicago.

MondayI

WILL STAGE ONE PERFORMANCE.
Rehearsals will be held at the Mich-
igan Union7 Monday and Tuesday
nights, at 7:00 o'clock, to get "Contra-
rie Mary" in form for presentation in
Chicago, May 24. A strict record of
attendance will be taken at both prac-
tice sessions, and those who do not
attend will~most likely- constitute the
personnel of the home list.
Bert St. John, director of the opera,
will be present both nights. As noj
ather events are scheduled at the
Jnion for these two dates, the entire
avening will be spent in rehearsing.
Further rehearsals will be announced,
to take place shortly before tho start
for the Windy City.
Everyone who had anything to do
with the local presentation of the Un-
ion show will be expected to attend.
Principals, dancing and singing chor-
uses, and orchestra members must be
there in order to insure their places.
As the choruses must be cut to bring
the number of the entire road company
down to 100, the men participating
in these parts will be especially noted
in regar to attendance.
There will be only one performance,
and that on Saturday evening, accord-
ing to present arrangements. The show
will be given in the Blackstone thea-
ter, and the Chicago ticket sale will'
open at once. A block of choica seats
will be sent to Ann Arbor, and put on
sale here next Friday and Saturday.
Although the advertising qtmpaign
for the Chicago show has not yet been
instituted, Manager Heath reports
much enthusiasm among the Cook
county alumni in anticipation of the
visit of the Michigan men.
To Enlarge Stage For May Festival.
A number of workmen are now em-
ployed in erecting a temporary stage
for the May Festival. A tier of eight
benches is being put up for the or-
chestra, which will accommodate 208
persons. The regular stage has been
extended so as to cover the first row
of orchestra seats.

Meetings will be held tomorrow by
both the sophomore and freshman
classes to elect captains and formu-
late plans of action for the spring
contests to be held Friday and Satur-
day. Soph lits will assemble in Tap-
pan hall at 4:15 o'clock,soph engineers
will meet at 4:30 o'clock in room 311
of the engineering building while the
soph laws will gather in room G of
the law building at 1:30 o'clock.
Fresh lits will hold a meeting in the
economics lecture room at 4:00 p. m.
The fresh engineers, dents, homeops
and pharmics will meet tomorrow,
times and places of assembly being
announced by posters on the bulletin
boards of their respective depart-
ments.
A mass meeting of the first year
classes has been called for Wednes-
day in the physics lecture room as a
final generator of enthusiasm, and the
sophs will combine for a similar gath-
ering Thursday at the same place.
These meetings will be conducted un-
der the supervision of the student
council.
The freshmen and sophomores who
expect to participate in the tug-of-
war events must weigh in at Water-
man gym tomorrow afternoon.
STUDENT KILLED IN
1 DETROITBY AUTO
Alan W. Tull, '13L, of Kingston, Md.,
died at Grace hospital in Detroit at
about 2:00 o'clock this morning from
concussion of the brain caused by an
automobile accident. He was spending
the day with his fiancee in Detroit and
*iad just left her when struck by the
auto on the corner of north Wood-
ward avenue and Elmhurst street at
about 11:00 o'clock last night.
Reports are indefirite but Tull is
believed to have bee ยข standing on the
corner waiting for a ar when a large
auto caught him from behind and
threw him to the pavement between
the tracks. The body was discovered

FAHMERS PROVE
EASY PICKING
First Year Men Urab Eleven Firsts in
Fourteen Events and f', amip
the Up staters,
88-47..
DIC I) c i tR1 J:it 'AND
POLE VAULT GO TO M.X.C.
Youngsters Make Good Time in Most
Events; Relay Proves to be
Walk Away.
By giabbing 11 firsts in 14 events
and taking the relay the all-fresh
track team more than duplicated the
trimming they administered the M. A.
C. aggregation on the indoor track and
walked away with the meet at Lan-
sing yesterday by the onesided count
of 88 to 47.
The youngsters started out by tak-
ing the shot put with a heave by
Cochran of 35 feet, 10 inches. Not
satisfied with merely the first counters
Farrell's pets took all three places
in the hundred,._H. L. Smith crossed
the tape in 10:1, Catlett and Arm-
strong then captured the two big plac-
es in the two hurdles and Kloeffer
landed second in each of the events..
In the quarter C. B. Smith had lit-
tle trouble in placing first and Gore
finished second. H. L. Smith took the
220 yard dash in 22:3, with Alderman
of M. A. C. running second and Little
of the all-fresh taking third. The half
was chalked up to Ufer's credit by cov-
ering the distance in 2:04:3.
Fox, who ran the mile in 4:42:2,
broke the M. A. C. record. The young-
ster ran a strong grace throughout and,
had little trouble in losing the rest of
the field in a fast sprint at the finish.
The two mile went to Lynch in 10:10:3{
with M. A. C. securing the other two
places.1
Bastion took the hammer with aa
throw of 100 feet, M. A. C. gettings
second and third. The discus was the
first of the three events that the fresh-
men allowed M. A. C. to land and the
farmers took advantage of the cour-
tesy and took second as well. The
high jump and pole vault were the,
other two events in which the fresh
failed to win the first ribbons.
The relay proved to be even more1
of a walk away than the rest of thec
meet, and by running the mile in 3:37
the quartette composed of Fox, Little,c
Gore, and C. B. Smith rounded out ther
final count to 88.C
ANNOUNCES CABINET FOR YEARs

(1 ('L C 1,U BS SE1,LECXT
0IFFICERIS FOR NEXT YEAR

iruce Miles, '14, Chosen President
Annual Banquet Last
Night.'

at

Bruce Miles, '14, was elected presi-
dent of the University of Michigan
Glee and Mandolin club, at the annual
dinner and business meeting of that
organization, held last evening at the'
Michigan Union. Alfred O. Williams,
'141, was chosen for the vice-presi-
dency, and the managership for.the
year 1913-1914 went to -1. Beach Car-
penter, '14.
Edward G. Kemp, who acted as pres-
Aent of the club for the last year,
was picked as leader of the glee club
for the ensuing season, and Russell
Mills, '14E, was elected to the leader-
ship of the mandolin club.
The recent trip to the Pacific coast,
taken by the glee club and a quartet
'rom the mandolin organization, was
discussed at length by. the speakers.
Retiring President Kemp served as
toastmaster, and called upon Prof. A.
1!. Lloyd, Prof. Evans Holbrook,, and
Mr. W. B. Shaw for talks. Malcolm
McCormick, manager of the club for
the past season, to whom the credit
for the western trip was accorded by
the student and facult speakers, read
an extensive reporV of the year's work.
PLACE MiMYERS
Frxeids Circulate Pettion For Third
Candidate For Union
Presidency.

OCCURS

ONLY ONCE BEFORE.

f
C
t

Y.A.C.A. Conmnittee Heads Appointed
by Pres Blanslard.
President Paul ]ianshard, '14, of the
university Y, M. C. A., announced
last night his cabinet for the ensuing
year. Harry M-Laughlin, '15, was ap-

by the motorman in an oncoming car.'
The auto did not stop and efforts of}

the authorities to overtake it were un-
successful.
Tull was taken immediately to Grace
.ospital and did not regain conscious-
ness.
He graduated from the Western
Maryland College with an A. B. degree
before coming to Michigan. He ex-
pected to complete his law work here
during summer school.

pointed head of the me:nbership com-
mittee; A. K Siman, '14, chairman of
the social service department; Frank
Olmstead, '15, chairman of the Bible
study committee; R. R. Fellers, '15, in
charge of the deputation work; Carl
Metzger, '14, missio nary chairman;
Paul Ranisdell, '15, advertising mana-I
ger, and T. 1I. Clark, '14, director of
the foreign student work.

It
T
ti
ti
;

Maurice C. Myers,,'11-'13L, was nom-
inated by petition yesterday for the
office of president of the Michigan Un-
ion. Unless further pt.ions are re-
ceived before Wednesday' evening at
6:00 o'clock, the presidential race will
be a three cornered affair, all of the
then placed in nomination being law
students. Besides Myers the following
men will run for the presidency: Sel-
ien S. Dickinson, '13-'15L, Louis F.
Haller, '11-'14L.
Myers' petition was signed by 26
members of the Union, the minimum
number required by the constitution
being 25. It was circulated yester-
day morning by friends.
The last and only case in the history
of the Union in which a man has been
nominated for an office by petition oc-
curred in 1911, when Harold Haskins,
11, entered the race for the recording
secretaryship. Haskins was victorious
in the election.
FRATERNiTIES WILL AID IN
HOUSING VISITING TEACHERS.
The inter-fraternity conference de-
cided at its last meeting to aid the
local committee of the Michigan State
Teachers' association in providing
lodgings for the 7,000 pedagogues who
will come here next October.
"The organization met the request
vith a broadminded generosity," said
Prof. W. W. Florer, "and I am assured
that the fraternities will do everything
n their power to make the meeting
of the teachers a big success."
Further plans for the big gathering
have been somewhat delayed owing to
the fact that the amount of money
which will be at the disposal of the
various committees can not as yet
be determined. The regents appropri-
ated $1,000 for this purpose some time
ago, and the newly"elected city coun-
cil is expected to make a similar ap-
ropriation.

PROVIDE FOR.
WOMEN SELF
GOVERNMENT
Executive Board of Women's League
Votes to Reorganize Itself and
Appoint Representative
Council
ELECT NOMINEES FOR NEW
BOARD AT ELECTION MAY 23.
Will Place Limitation Upon Number
of Offices a Woman
Can Hold.
University women are to have a self
governing board. To make this board
their direct representative, the execu-
tive board of the Wom'en's League,
which will appoint the new council, is
to be reorganized. Such was the ac-
tion of the open meeting of the league
executive board yesterday morning,
when the constitution was amended to
provide for these plans.
The amendment provides for the
nomination of two women from each
sorority, league house and house club
to run for membership on the execu-
tive board. Only one woman from
each house, however, shall be elected
at the general election May 23. The
independents, at large are to nominate
ten women, five of whom are to be
elected. This completely upsets the;.
old board, 11 members of which rep-
resented the 11 sororities. The 600
independents of the university were
given the remaining 11 members.
These nominees will be elected at
the general election which will be.
conducted in Barbour gym and the
General Library from 8:00 to 6:00
o'clock May 23. All officers of the
eague, as well as the new executive
board, will be chosen at this time.
This new board will draft plans for
the appointing of a self-governing
committee to act as a standing com-
mittee of the 1 gue. No plans for this
council are re dy yet as the new board
is to have ful charge of the matter.
The one efi te rule on which the
council is is that all its men-
ers shall be s u n
The distribut n of honrs by a sys-
em of points s discussed. The re-
port of the no athletic board in fa-
Tor of the sche was favorably pass-
ad upon. The blan provides for the
limiting of the number of offices that
)ne woman can hold during her four
rears a an undergraduate student.
each office in the 'university open to
vomen is rated as' valued from seven
points down. The presidency of the
.eague is valued at seven points. This
s the highest value placed upon one
ffice. The largest number of points
>btainable by the women is ten a
,emester. Detailed plans will be an-
iounced later.
[R. HUBBARD TO TEST STEAK.
Pharmacist Will Inspect Samples of
Suspicious Hamburg.
Until the municipal meat inspection
s established, Dr. W. S. Hubbard, of
he pharmacy department, has offered
,o test any samples of suspicious ham-
urg steak which are submitted to
Lim.
"This will be an excellent plan,"
aid Dr. J. A. Wessinger, health officer,
and I would advise anyone who 1s
Oiven meat which tastes peculiar to
rake it to Dr. Hubbard at once."

No further action has been taken on
he Brummeler case, 'but the univer-
ity sanitation committee is exected
to investigate it as soon as Drs.
Vaughan and Warthin retuin from
Vashington.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

i0:3o A, M.-Sermon by Leonard A. Ba rett.
Dynamic in Life."

"Ethusiasm, the

:2:oo-University Classes fo- Men and Women. Prof. T. E. Rankin,
6:30 P. M.-Christian Endeavor. Leader, Stewart.

I

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P resident

OzariaU

Fl

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President Chicago Theological Seminary

1

AT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH TON CHT

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