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May 10, 1913 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i

Now is the Season for

Ite Serge and Flannel
TROUSERS

e have all the patterns shown by most woolen houses.
1 B to your advantage to sce tLcm. They are priced
and when Malcolm makes you a trouser, tle fit and
is assured. We are she m ing a fine Summer Blue
at twenty-three dollars--for the hot days. Drop in
ee the line.

J. Karl Malcolm,

Liberty St.

Malcolm Block

Miss Florence JHnkie. .
Miss Florence Hinkle, the distin-
guished soprano who will sing at the
music festival in Hill auditorium May
14 to 17, is one of the younger Ameri-
can singers, but she has already con-
vinced musicians and critics that she
is one of our best equipped and most
reliable artists. Her successful ap-
pearance in the festival last year mak-
es her engagement grateful to festival
patrons. She will sing in the Thurs-
day and Saturday evening concerts.
HARRISON FELLOWSHIPS GO
TO MICHIGAN GRADUATES.
Gilbert Hobbs Barnes, '12, and Ver-
ner Winslow Crane, '11, were awarded
Harrison fellowships in history in -the
Universityt of Pennsylvania for the
year 1913-14. Barnes received an A.B.
degree from Michigan last year and is
now in the graduate school. 'Crane,
who is now a Harrison fellow in his-
tory in the University of Pennsylvania,
received an A.B. degree from Michigan
in 1911, 'and an A.M. degree from Har-
vard last year.

START WORK FOR
SPRINGCONTESTS
Classes Will Elect Captains for Usual
Events on Monday
Afternoon.
OFFICIALS TO MEET THURSDAY.
"Spring contests this year promise
to be of the old time variety and pep
machines will be set in motion in the
underclasses the first of next week,"
said W. S. Hopkin, '13E, general chair-
man of the contest, last night. Hopkin,
in conjunction with all fresh and soph
class presidents and referee Carroll
Haff, '15L, has outlined the contests
and committees have started work.
Classes will elect captains at meet-
ings Monday afternoon, and that even-
ing the captains will meet with the
general chairmanand referee at the
Michigan Union at 7:30 o'clock. At
this meeting, they will toss for sides
in the tug-of-war events, and decide
other details.
According to the system of distribu-
tion decided on last Thursday fresh
lits will elect captains for the light
weight tug-of-war, second relay, and
push ball, fresh engineers will choose
heavy and middle weight tug-of-war,
and first relay captains, while the com-
bined remaining departments were al-
lotted third relay captain. Soph Zits
will pick captains for heavyweight
tug-of-war, and the first and second
relay events; soph engineers will elect
middleweight tug-of-war and first re-
lay captains, while the laws will
choose a push ball captain and the
lightweight tug-of-war position will
probably go to the combined remain-
ing departments.
As a result of the objection in prevl--
ous years that in the second tug-of-war
one end of the rope is wet giving the
other side an advantage, this year
both ends of the rope will be soaked
in the Huron after the first contest.
Mass meetings of the freshman and
sophomore classes will be held Wed-
nesday and Thursday according to
plans to be decided on next week.
The first tug-of-war is scheduled to
start promptly at 3:30 o'dlock Friday
afternoon, but the time of the other
contests has not yet been decided.

Just -eceived
New Lots of Rubber
Soled Ox. rdsfor
Men nd Wo e.
The Satisfactory kind have sold
here for the past seven years.
I I S
SNeati E
I have no connection whatever with
any other store.
When your Rubber Soled Shoes need Re-soling,
bring them here for a SATISFACTORY job. You
will not be disappointed.
For a Drink That's Right

9

I

'

very meal: with fruit, either fresh or preserved;
>oached eggs or cheese-good a hundred different
e package, at all grocers.
RUSK COMPANY Holland, Mich.
Anu Arbor Home Bakery, Distributors

" ... I

tf

$Gto7
Absolutely
FK

TH E
THE

Fow , O 1NTAIN AT
itEXAeLL STORE,

users

Our Fountain is working overtime-come in
and try us out
THE BROWN DRUG STORE
THE EXALL STORE
- -z a ... e . u D r.6.t g.

I

li

- -A

CA~&

E. C.. Edsl, Successor

122 Stuth Main Street

I I

- - - - - -

I

'y suit order for a short time only,

merely to

itroduce our made-to=your-measure clothes.
We pride ourselves on our wdolens, the quality of
hich is unsurpassed. Our workmanship is perfect;
e guarantee you perfect fit and can convince you by
trial order, that you can save from $10.00 to $15.00
i every suit made to your measure.'
iits Made for you at $17.50 to $25.00
Idhe Quality Tailors

Union Dance Tickets have Slow Sale.
Twenty-five tickets for Saturday
night's Union membership dance had
been sold last night. The fact that no
more than this were gone on Friday
night of last week while over 80 coup-
les attended the dance seems to indi-
cate that nearly all of those remain-
ing will be sold today. A. H. Kuhn,
'13E, is chairman and the committee
will consist of a number of the chair-
men from both this and last semester.
The chaperones are Prof. and Mrs. H.
H. Atwell and Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Car-
ey.
Ann Arbor Dye Works
French Dry and Steam Cleaning
Bell 628 204.E. Washington St
L. R. WAHL, Manager.

SENIOR WOMEN ARE ASSIGNED
PARTS IN PLAY.
(Continued from page 1.)
ic reading and has assisted in the or-
atory department. Mildred Guilford,
who plays Charles Surface, has taken
prominent roles in the French and or-
atorical plays this year. Elaine
Shields will take the difficult part of
Harry Bumper. She has acted in the
junior women's plays and the French
play.
The plot of .the play is too well
known to need any synopsis, the in-
terest of the production lying in the
lines which demand especial ability.
In order to make the play as strong as
possible the book has been cut to allow
a two hour performance. Prof. Hollis-
ter, who is drilling the cast, thought
that this cut was warranted from the
standpoint of the audience.
An aesthetic Greek play was offered
by the graduating class of last year
in front of Memorial hall, carrying
out the old Grecian idea of open air
productions. It has been eight years
since Sheridan's play was presented
at the university. A picked cast from
the faculty dramatic society portrayed
the story then as it was originally act-
ed in Drury Lane theater in London,
1777

209 E. Liberty St.,

NDERS, Mgr.
zerly Ayr. The Woolen .Mills Co.

]doue Tel. Bldg.
Our *
Motto: uLLlcIIA'J

Not Confected with Any Other Store

ANNUAL VEREIN PLAY PROVES
BIG SUCCE'SS.
(Continued*from page 1.)
made the most of by the German play-
ers.
There were no star parts in the
farce but as Earl Broshq, a landlord,
Lawrence Clayon maintained his us-
ual standard of acting by a clever in-
terpretation of a rather difficult part.
Friederike, wife of Broshe was played
by Gertrude Helmecke, who at all
times held herself as a worthy second
to Clayton. Clarence Goshorn '15
played the part of Krafft, a country
landlord with perfect ease. This is
his first appearance in German plays
and with but two weeks of practice,
having filled the part of Herbert Wil-
kins who was called home, deserves
considerable credit. Leonard Rieser
as Hugo was a clever little lover while
Clara Hoffman as Helene interpreted
the accompanying role admirably. Irv-
ing Bassett as Seidel filled every re-
quirement of his part. Mildred Nuech-
terlein as Rosa, and Julius Herbert
as Drossel enacted a rather difficult
love role easily. Laretta Helmsdorfer
as Emilie Pickenbach was an enticing
trouble-maker, and Erwin Hartung,
Reuben Peterson and all other char-
acters showed considerable ability.
John Townley and Lawrence Clay-
ton coached the actors, this being the
first Verein production which has not
been given under direct faculty train-
ing, with great success.
ADEL11RI: SOCIETY
WINS CUP- DEBATE.,
(Continued from page 1).
team.
Six victories have been credited to
the Webster society, and one to the
Jeffersonian society. These societies,
together with Alpha Nu, are competing
for permanent ownership of the cup,
which will go to the society winning
the most of 20 annual debates.
L Becker, H. D. Parker, and N. H.
Goldstick, all '15 men, composed the
Adelphi team. Jeffebsonian society
was represented by E. E. Storkan, '14L,
W. T. Bie, '13L,. and W. J. Laidlau,
'14L.

t

T

THAT

TICKET

N-OW

FO R

T H E

Big

y Festty

r Hill Auditorium

May 14, 15, 163 17

The committee in charge of the play
is Elaine Shields chairman, Louise
Conklin and Mary Palmer. The. fcl-
lowing is the cast in full:
Sir Peter Teazle .... Madeline Bird
Sir Oliver Surface .. Mary Ruthrauff
Sir ?arry Bumper .. Elaine Shields'
Sir Benjamin Backbite . Ethel Wheeler
Joseph Surface ...... Winifred Rowe
Charles Surface .... Mildred Guilfcrd
Careless ............ Mable Bradshaw'
Snake.................Grace Hull
Crabtree ............. Audrey Updike
Rowley...............Leila Smith
Moses ................ Carrie Fyffe
Trip ............... Agnes Greene
Lady Teazle........ Laura Auerholt
Lady Sneerwell.......Georgia Maier
Mrs. Candour ...... Harriett Carroll
Maria ............ Florence Swinton
Servant to Joseph ...... Edna Alfred

Four Days-Five Concerts

Course Tickets, $4.00, $5.00, 6.0
Single Tickets (after May 8) $1.00, $1.25, $1.50
Further Information Call at University School of Music.

_,--

- IF
n_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _i i
hA~ii~i^ 6"
2iK;L

T FrA

#A ERICA'S GREATEST FIFTEEN DLLAR CLOTHEg

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