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May 09, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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READ DAILY BY
5,000 STUDENTS.

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- --_ ---

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 9, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

FRESH TEAM 1IS
Nineteen Youngsters Are Selected ByA
Trainer Farrell to Compete
Against Aggies
Tomorrow.
ATHLETES SHOW GOOD FORM
IN ALL TRIAL EVENTS
Squad is Strengthened Materially by
the Addition of New Weight
Men.

@iy ie li e-a2i 7 r a. d i y}" : soy.
t d iiM k tu'

SiN TO 1101lD CIENERAT SINGS.
Frst f Series Will Be Held on Front
Porch Tonight.
General sings for all university stu-
dens will be sponsored every Friday
evening(luring.the spring by the Mich-
igan Union. The first affair of this
nature will be held at 7:00 o'clock this
evening, in front of the Union. A
piano will be placed on the porch of

CLASS OF 1913
SWINGS OUT IN,
ANNUAL PARADE
Near Graduates Begin Long List of
Commencement Events In
Ajinual Parade About
Campus.
DR. ANGELL GIVES ADVICE
IN A SPIRITED 'ADDRESS.

Law Wll (o ino Efecy !fo1
Fal u a

Next I

I Examination.

Based on their showing in yester- Ann Arbor il ha a central nu-
day's trials, nineteen men were count- nicipal slauhter house and inspec-
ed out by Farrell last night toleave tion plant beore the univesity reo-
for ,Lansing, tomorrow morning, to 4 ens next fall, a salt of three

1the clubhouse, for the purpose of ac-
cormpanying the songs, and it is prob-
able that stringed music will be intro-
duced at later sings.
The new concerts will be of an in-
formal nature, and Michigan songs
wil be featured for the most part. All
elasses will be expected to participate.
EREITO SWAGE
ITS PLAY TORIGHT
" el Prdiction of Sociy to Be
xen at Whiney
Theater.

Following Uusual Program
Promenade on Walks and
Form 'M."

1,

meet the M. A. C. Varsity track team
in a dual contest on their home
grounds. In every case the verdant
athletes lived up to their indoor re-
putations, clipping seconds from their
records in the longer track events.
Cochran and Benton made the rhot
put and the discus events. These men
(Continued on page 4.)
NTO SO IALIST
Dr. Algernon Crapsey, of Rochester,
N. Y., to Lecture on "Man
Versus Money."
A FORMER EPISCOPALIAN RECTOR
Dr. Algernon Sidney Crapsey, for
nearly thirty years rector of St. An-
drew's church, Rochester, N. Y., will

months' wrk of ih i a' oiatien
0cm aittee apoin~ d for tha purpose.
The ordinam hih rides for te
appointment of te inpeelion o cial
and the esmabis ntm Oi the slauh-
ter house is bein traw1, up b. the
cyattoney adniibe completedt
hin a few days.
(Contind on page 3.)
IProi. W'iHlli L hbs l'tiirmas to
Uniei ,iy Afei' Ten
Months9 Absenlce0
ST UII El) STRUCTU !r E OF ALPS
Prof. William H. Hobbs, professor of
geology and director of the geological

speak Tuesday evening, May 13, in museum, returned Wednesday morn-
Newberry hall on "Men Versus Money, ing from a ten months' leave of ab-
a Contrast in Motives." isence spent in Europe. Mrs. Hobbs
Dr. Crapsey was from 1872 to 1879 rmained in Eurone where her daugh-
in the service of Trinity church, Newr
York City. From the latter year until ter is attending school-
1907, he spent in Rochester, at which Prof. Hobbs spent last summer in
time he was tried by a church court the Alps studying the geological struc-
for heresy, and was deposed from the ture of the mountains. Afterward he
Episcopalian ministry. went to the Sudan and studied the
According to one of his fellow min- deserts of that region, thence to Malta
isters in the liberal wing of the church, where he investigated the island's
the teaching for which Dr. Crapsey structure.
was deposed are liberal views now He represented the univer-
rather widely accepted. Since his de- sity at the 250th anniversary of the
position from the ministry, Dr. Crap- founding of the Royal Society of Eng-
sey has written and preached along land and was a delegate of this univer-
liberal lines. sity and the American Philosophical
He comes to Ann Arbor under the society at the International Geograph-
auspices of the Intercollegiate Social- ical Congress at Rome last March and
ist society. April.
r
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Ai
ir -~,~~$"
A I~ -

. VF IQIS 1 WELL TRAINED
With a well trained cast of 16 the
Deutscher Verein will present "Koep-
nickerstrasse 120" at the New Whitney
theater tonight. At the dress rehears-
al last night details were perfected.
This is the eleventh annual play
Miany members of the cast have
Played in former Verein productions
while some have actually seen the life
which is depicted in the farce. The
humorous action is centered about a
trade of houses in a typical German
(0mn munity.
Nearly 500 tickets have been sold
but many good seats remain at prices
from 35 cents to $1.00. These will be
on sale at the New Whitney theater
box office today.
Those who will take part in the play
are: Lawrence Clayton, Gertrude Hel-
mecke, Clara Hoffman, Mildred Neuch-
~erlein, Irving Bassett, Leonard Ries-
er, J. J. herbert, Clarence Goshorn,
Lau retta hlelmsdorfer, Emra Jaqua,
Erwin hiartung, Reuben Peterson, Jr.,
Edna Alfred, Ethel Wheeler, and John
miner.
John II. Townley, '13, has been in
charge of the coaching for the pro-
duction.
TO 1013) ANNUAL VARSITY CUP
]EBATE IN U. HALL TONIGHT
Adelp{hi and Jeffersonian Societies
Meet; Chas. C. Simmons
to Preside.
Adelphi and Jeffersonian literary soci-
eties will meet in the annual Univer-
sity cup debate in University Hall at
3:00 o'clock this evening for the pos-
session of the Detroit alumni associ-
ation cup for the coming year.
Charles C. Simmons, of De-
troit, will preside, in accordance
with the custom of having a member
of the Detroit association, which fur-
nishes the cup, in charge of the de-
bate. The question this year is "Re-
solved, that the presidential term be
extended to six years, and the incum-
bent be ineligible for re-election."
The Jeffersonian team, which has
defeated the Websters in the prelimi-
nary law department contest, is com-
hosed of E. E. Storkan, '14L,
W. . Bie, '13L, and W. J.
(ontinued on page 3.)
Qepresents University at Chicago.
Beverly B. Vedder, '10-'12L, repre-
sented Michigan in Chicago recently at
a meeting of the arrangement commit-
tee of the International amateur ath-
letic championship association. The
committee made plans to hold an in-
ernational collegiate track meet in
Chicago July 2 and- 3,

The last senior class.has swung out
of University Hall.
More than 1,000 future alumni of
the class of 1913 participated yester-
day afternoon in the exercises mark-
ing the beginning of the long list of
events which only commencement will
bring to a close.
Gathering in the vicinity of various
campus buildings soon after 3:00
o'clock, the black-robed seniors united
in entering University Hall to hear the
program which had been prepared.
After an invocation by the Rev. Ar-
thur Stalker, of this city, a vocal solo
was rendered by Bruce D. Bromley,
'14, followed by a short'talk by Pres.
Harry B. Hutchins.
"In this century of wonderful pro-
gress," said Pres. Hutchins, "the col-
lege graduate is playing and will con-
tinue to play a prominent role. The
modern tendency is undoubtedly to-
ward specialization in all lines of pro-
fessional and business work, but there
is a great danger that this will be car-
ried too far. In order to guard against
this I advise you, in planning your life
work, to choose some form of public
service and interest yourself in it
throughout your life."
I)r. Angell Gives Advice.
Dr. James Burrill Angell, president-
emeritus of the university, closed the
program of speeches with some words
of advice to the near-graduates.
"Do not proclaim or attempt to seek
recognition for your superior intelli-
gence," he said. "Out in the world you
will find people who have accumulated
wisdom through many years of ex-
perience.
"In the second place, you must learn
how to differ from people with a sweet
and amiable spirit. The man who-can-
not argue without becoming ill-tem-
pered is a nuisance.
"Do not approach people whom you
wish to ask for favors, with servile
flattery. This sort of thing i disgust-
ing to the men of affairs who may be -
able to do you a good turn.
"Fourthly, try to conform to the
good usages and manners of your time.
If you believe customs are wrong or
evil disparagement on your part is not
the right way to do away with them.
"Always have before you as a com-
manding influence over .your life the
idea of giving some part of your spare
time to some phase of what the world
calls 'social service.' Humanity ex-
pects and has a right to expect this o
you as college men and Women."
Dr. Angell concluded his tali by
urging the seniors to point out the
comparative ease with which an edu-
cation may be secured to prospective
freshmen, saying that this was one of
the greatest services alumni may per-
form for their alma mater and for
civilization.
Seniors March in "M."
After the ceremonies the seniors
swung out of the main entrance of
University hall and promenaded the
campus. The route taken was south
on State street to Memorial hall, then
east on South University to the engi
neering arch, through the ampus to
(Continued on page 3.)

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