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May 08, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-05-08

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ORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

The Mc~n

Dally

READ DAILY BY
5,000 STUDENTS.

No. 154.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 8, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ISTRATION

DU RES SNOW
805 ST UDENTS
f 169 for Regular Session and
23 for Summer School i's
Shown in Registration
Statistics.
V STATE - AND 23 FOREIGN
ATIONS ARE REPRESENTE ,
se Travelled in Reaching Ann
bor is Estimated to be Over
3,,000,000 Tiles.

I THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Thursday,
fair.
University Observatory--Wednesday,
7:00 p. in., temperature 51.4; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
60.0; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 37.0; average wind velocity,
7 miles per hour.
TICKETS TO COVER JANITOR'S
FUNERAL EXPENSES GO WELL
The sale of tickets to defray the ex-
penses of burial of William H. Hew-
ett, former janitor in the medical
buildi-ng, has been generously support-
ed by the students who meet the white-
coated janitor while passing the phy-
siology and pharmacology building.
More than 100 have already been
sold at 25 cents. The drawing will
take place at te physiology building
Saturday afternoon.
MAKE PLANS
FOR SAFETY'

Complete registration figures
for the year 1912-13 show
that there are . 5,805 students
in the university including the sum-
mer session, and 5,099 excluding the
summer session. This shows a gain
of 169 students in the regular session
over last year and 223 over the grand
total of 1911-'12.
Every state and territory of the
United States is represented and 23
foreign countries also send students,
showing that Michigan is one of the
greatest cosmopolitan universities in
the country. The state of Michigan
has 3,140 students in the university
and Ohio with 440 is second. Four oth-
er states also contribute more than
200 students which are New York, 378,
Illinois, 262, Pennsylvania, 234 and In-
liana, 208.
Of the foreign countries China has
the most students in the university,'
sending 83. Only two other countries
are represented by more than 10 stu-
dents and are Ontario with 26 and Ja-
pan 12. There are 179 foreign stu-
.dents showing a gain of 31 over 1911-
'12.
All but four states and territories
are represented in the literary depart-
ment and the summer school; while
the law department has students from
all but eight. In the engineering de-
partment students come from all but
seven of the states.
The greatest gain for the present
year was in the literary departmentt
where there are 225 more students
than last year. The other departments
to register a gain were: engineering,
44, graduate, 38, dentistry, 28, pharma-
cy, 12. Owing to the increased en-
trance requirements the law depart-
ment shows a loss of 124 and the hom-
eop 20. The medic department reports
(Continued on page 4.)
STUDENT COUNCIL TO PICK
OFFICERS FOR COMING YEAR
The election of student council offi-
cers for the ensuing semester will be
held at a special meeting of the or-
ganization Tuesday evening at 7:00;
p. m. Nominations for the new coun-7
cilmen to be elected will be held oni
Monday, May 19, while the elections,
will take place on Wednesday, May 21.

SORORITIES EXCELL GENERAL
FRATERNITIES IN SCHOLARSHIP!
Sororities and women's clubs are .averages above passing, though below
credited with the highest and genert Ifth entire university average.
fraternities with the lowest scholastic Ceneral fraternities in this class are
standing in the year 1911-'12, accord- S:nfoni., Phi Delta Theta, Del-
ing to a chart of comparative rating.' "a Kappa Epsilon, Delta Upsilon,
just issued by the university authcri- Theta Delta Chi, Phi Kapy'a Psi, 1i
ties. Tau Beta Pi is the only men's Upsilon, and Alpha Sigma Phi. Two
organization to be classed above th 2 scrorities.. Mu Phi Epsilon, and Gamma
ideal average, and is a close second to Phi Beta, and one women's club, Park-
Adams House, a women's club, wh ch cr house, are also grouped on the sun-
boasts the highest standing of any ny side of the danger line, There are
group on the campus. also ten fraternities and five men's
The seven sororities whose grades 'clubs above the line. These are Nu
are above the ideal average are, in Sigma Nu, Phi Alpha Dela, Alpha Kap-
order, Pi Beta Phi, Chi Omega, Delta pa Kappa, Delta Sigma Delta, Pi Upsi-
Gamma, Collegiate Sorosis, Kappa Al- Ion Rho, Phi Alpha C amma, Phi Beta
pha Theta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, and Pi, Phi Chi, Alpha Kappa Phi,' Xi Psi
Alpha Phi. Sweezy House, Wilbur Phi, Pylon, Trigon, New York, Rocky
House, Rankin House, and Westmin- Mountain, and Hermitage.
ster, among the league houses, are The women failed to keep altogether
also in this class. clear, however, for Smith House and
Unorganized students' averages"are Omega Upsilon have a scholarship rec-
the next highest in the scale, and, be- ord below the passing grade. Three
tween the average of the entire uni- professional fraternities, Alpha Sigma,
versity and the ideal average, are Phi Rho Sigma., and Phi Delta Chi, and
three professional fraternities, Phi th? Keystone club, a men's organiza-
Delta Phi, Gamma Eta Gamma, and tion are also rated as of inferior stand-
Psi Omega; one. sorority, Alpha Chi ing.
Omega; and Benjamin and Halc3on In all, 16 general fraternities have
Houses, which are women's clubs. scholarship standings below the pass-
Below the university average a:d ing grade. This group comprises Del-
yet with passing grades are 27 organi- ta Tau Delta, Kappa Sigma, Phi Gam-
zations. Of these, a professional s-r- ma Delta, Alpha Della Phi, Ze'a Psi,
ority, Alpha Epsilon Iota, leads, with Phi Kappa Sigma, Alpha Tau Omega.
all women's house clubs folowing. Sigma Nu: Sigma Chi, Chi Psi, Delta
Other men's clubs, professional frater- Chi, Acacia, Beta Theta Pi, Sigma Al-
nities, and Varsity athletes all have pha Epsilon, and Sigma Phi.

Mr. Samuel M. Crothers, of Cam-
bridge, Mass., will be the principal
speaker at the annual initiation and
banquet of Phi Beta Kappa at the
Michigan Union to-night at 7:00. Dr.
Crothers, who is widely known for
his essays in the Atlantic Monthly,
will speak on "The Secondary Func-
tion of Literature."rMore than 100
members from several chapters will
be present which is the largest num-
ber that his ever attended this event.
Pro'. Joseph L. Markley, president
of Phi Beta Kappa in Michigan, will
give a few introductory remarks,
after which an address of welcome
will be given by Prof. W. A. Frayer,
in which the members will be told
the ideals and purposes of Phi Beta
Kappa.
Robert B. Lane, '13, and Miss Agnes
Parks, '13, will make responses in be-
half of the new members.
PREPARE FOR
UNION OPERA
PERFORMNC E

WVIIG-VU.1
HELD TODAY

Clad

in Academic Robes, Seniors Will
Parade Around the Campus
Forming Block ""

OF BOATERSI

WILL DELIVER ANNUAL PHI iTR ADITIONAL
BETA KAPPA TALK TDNI6HT~ ~1ILf lI~

Committee from University Civic As-
sociation and Edison Co. Meet to
Prepare for Safeguarding
of Huron.
SIGNS 'WILL BE PLACED AT
DAM CLOSE TO POWER HOUSE

Detaiis of "Contrare. Mary" Will
Arranged by Officials
in Windy City
Saturday.

Bie

Dangerous Places on River Will
Fixed After Inspection by
Boat Club.

BeI

Preliminary plans for the safeguard-
ing of the Huron river were formulat-
ed at the joint meeting of the univer-
sity, Civic association officials and Ed-
ison company authorities yesterday
afternoon.
Prof. C. H. Johnston, Supt. of
GroundsJ. H. Marks, Sec. S. W. Smith,
and J. W. Morrison, '14, represented
the university, while Pres. F. Allmen-
dinger of the Civic association, Mana-
ger Hemple and former Professor G.
S. Williams, of the Edison Co., and
Vice-commodore G. B. Duffield, '14E,
of tie Boat club, represented the oth-
ers interested.
Secretary Smith was made chairman
of the meeting, and was authorized to
write to Harvard for information re-
garding their regulations for the ca-
noeists on the Charles river, where
12,000 boats are often seen.
The Edison company also agreed to
put in an iron gate, which is to be
kept locked, at the roller beside the
tail race. All boatsmen will have to
stop at the power house to get the
key, and only those in row boats will
be allowed to put their craft down the
shute. A warning will be placed above
the gate that no canoeists will be al-
lowed to go down there. Another sign
will be placed at the entrance of the
tail race and no canoeists will be al-
lowed there at all. The lights at the
dam will be kept lit until 11:00 o'clock.
The following resolution regarding
the boats will be allowed on the river
was passed:
R.solhe, That the chairman be re-
quested to secure the advice of Profes-
sors Cooley and Sadler, and others if
desired, as to the safety of the various
types of canoes now in use on the riv-

METHODISTS
AND VARSITY
CLASH TODAY
ORANGE AND BLACK TEAM MAY
PROVE STUMBLING BLOCK FOR
HOME NINE. BARIBEAU IN BOX
AND SISLER AT FIRST IS DOPE.
Unless Syracuse presents a stronger
front than the majority of teams that,
have appeared here this year there;
may be two swing outs today. But
the chances are that the Orangemen
will engage the Varsity in a tussle that
will be meat and bread to the Ann
Arbor fans. In the matter of base
ball, the easterners have always had
the edge on Michigan and there is a
lot to call for revenge. But with six
veterans on their team who remember
other days, this revenge is not going
to be easy picking.
Syracuse has had a good record so
far his year and has touched severa
eastern teams in tender spots. When
two thirds of the men on the team
have played together for a year or
more there is apt to be machine work
in their playing and it is this machine
work that corrals the runs.. And aside
from this feature they have a hurler
named De Silva who is some hurler.
If this gentleman takes it into his
head to pitch ball, Michigan is going
(Continued on page 4.)
GIVE STANLEY PORTRAIT TO
UNIVERSITY AT FESTIVAL

DELAY VISITS
INVESTIGATION,
OF POISONING
STEAK, iu v CAUSED DEATH OF
BRtUMMELER WAS LAST OF
WEEK'S SUPPLY AND NO SAM-
PLE COULI) BE OBTAINED.
No sample of the hamburger steal,
which is, supposed to have caused the
tragic death of Alfrel Brummeler,'14
Tuesday, has been examined. No au-
topsy was performed on the body, and
as the hamburg served at Brummel-
er's boarding house Monday was the,
last of the week's supply, it was im-
possible to secure a specimen for an-
alysis.
Secretary Shirley W. Smith, when
asked last night whether the universi-
ty would take any action on the Brum-
meler case, stated that the matter
came within the province of the uni-
versity sanitation committee. Dean
Vaughan, the chairman, is in Washing-
ton, and will not return until Satur-
day morning. Dr. Warthin, chairman
of the civic association committee
which has such matters in charge i..
also in Washington and no definite ac-
tion will be taken until their return.
F A MOIUS J1olUIRN A LIST TO SPEAK.
1)e.w Williams of Columbia Will Talk
to Newspaper Class Today.
"The Making of a Journalist" will
be the subject of a lecture by Dear
Talcott Williams, head of the Pulitzer
School of Journalism at Columbia
University before Prof. F. N. Scott'E
class in journalism this morning at
9:00 o'clock.
Mr. Williamz has been connected
with the newspaper profession as a
correspondent of the New York Sun,
and as a member of the staff of the
New York World, and the Philadelphia'
Press. He was chosen head of the
Pulitzer school while serving on the
latter paper.
Anyone interested in the subject
may attend the lecture.

PERS(NNEL OF CAST TO BE
NA3IED AT NEXT REHEARSAL
Charges Will be Maie in Costuming;
Mr. St John Will Go
With Troupe.
Final details regarding the presen-
tation of "Contrarie Mary" in the Ill-
inois theater, Chica-o, will be arrang-
ed Saturday, when Manager Homer
fleath, of the Union, and Phillip K
Fletcher, '13E, general chairman oI
the opera, will journey to the Windy
City. Preparation for the advance ad-
vertising of the performances will be
.nade at this time. While in Chicagc
the Michigan men will witness a mu-
sical show put on by the Black Friars.
of the University of Chicago.
As only 100 men will be carried or
the tour, it will be necessary to leave
behind 16 of the students who took
part in the local production last March.
For the purpose. of determining the
personnel of the "home list," a gen-
eral rehearsal will be called next
week, at which time a strict record of
the attendance will be taken and the
choruses pruned accordingly.
Chairman Fletcher and Howard Wil-
son, '13, master of costumes, held a
conference with Bert St. John, direct-
or of the opera, in Detroit last Satur-
day. At this time it was decided to
make some changes in the costuming
for the Chicago performances. The
wig man and make-up artists, whc
officiated in the dressing rooms at the
Whitney here for the Ann Arbor
shows, will be taken to Chicago, and
Mr. St. John will also accompany the
troupe.
Desp'ite some objection on the part
>f those participating in "Contrarie
Mary," the opera train will leave Chi-
cago on the return trip Saturday even-
ing, immediately after the evening
performance. The special train carry-
ing the aggregation to the Cook Coun-
ty metropolis will leave Ann Arbor
Friday evening following the Cap
Night ceremonies.
Freshman Girl Leaves University.
Miss Magelene Tschaeche, '16, has
withdrawn from the university and
returned to her home. She will. sail
for Germany on the 27th of this month
and will spend the summer in travel-
ling in Germany, Switzerland, and
France. Miss Tschaeche does not in-
tend to return to the university.
Power House Construction Progresses
Concrete construction on the foun-
dations of the new power-house is now
practically completed and about half
of the heavy steel trusses and girders
are already in place. The other large
pieces will probably be hoisted in
place during next week. -

at Conclusion.
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS AND DR,
ANGELL WILL GIVE SPEECHES
Program Will Start Promptly at 3:15
and All Senior Sing is Billed
For Evening,
Clad in their academic robes of so-
ber black, more than one thousand
seniors from every department of the
university will participate this after-
noon in the traditional "swing out"
exercises, the last to be held in histor-
ic old University Hall.
At 3:05 p. in. this afternoon, the
weather permitting, the seniors, dress-
ed for the first time in caps and
gowns, will meet with their respect-
ive classes on the University walks.
Those of the literary department will
assemble between the museum and
University. hall, and the engineers be-
tween University hall and Dr. An-
gell's residence. The medics will
gather between University hall Ad
the library; the laws between Univer-
sity hall and the flag pole; the phar-
mics in front of the-cannon; the hom-
eops at the north entrance of the eco-
nomics building; and the dents at the
south door of the economics building.
As the campus clock strikes the
quarter past three, the members of the
different departments, in order named,
will proceed to University Hall where
the usual exercises will be held. The
program will begin promptly at 3:30
p. in. and the Rev. Arthur W. Stalker
will offer the invocation. Dr. James
B. Angell and Pres. Harry B. Hutch-
ins will delier addresses, and Bruce,
D. Bromley, '14; will sing a solo.
Following the. benediction by Rev.
Stalker,. the seniors will leave the hall
by the main entrance, and led by Sel-
len S. Dickinson, lit president, and.
Clem Quinn, chairman of the 'cap and
gown committee, the near graduates
will promenade around the campus.
The line of march is so planned as to
describe a large "M" on the various
walks.
Contrary to the rumor that has been
widely circulated on the campus, the
senior canes will not be carried.
At 7:00 o'clock .tonight, the sen-
iors will gather on the steps of Me-
morial hall for the first all-senior
sing of the year. Members of the glee
and 'mandolin clubs will also meet at
Memorial hall at this time and will
take part in the sing.
Leaflets with all details and direc-
tions for the "swing out" will be dis-
tributed this morning. This' precau-
tion is being taken by the seniors to
prevent all unnecessary mistakes. The
seniors are urged to be prompt in get-
ling into line.
In case of rain, notices of postpoe-
ment will be posted.
GERMAN PLAY HAS
LARGESEATSALE
This is the last day of the "Koep-
nickerstrasse 120" seat sale at Wahr's
bookstore. A large number of good
seats remain at prices from 35 cents
to $1.00 and may, be purchased this
afternoon from 4:00 to :00 o'clock.
Tomorrow the seats will be on sale at
the regular hours at the New Whitney
theater box office.
A complete dress rehearsal will be
held at the theater this evening at
which details will be perfected for
the performance tomorrow night. Con-
siderably more has been spent in ev-
ery department than for previous per-
formances of the Verein.
Prof. J. W. Scholl described the play
in detail in a lecture in the Economics
building yesterday afternoon, describ-

ing the action and situations in the
farce.
The plot of the play represents a
mix-up in real estate relations and
with a farcical trend throughout is
particularly adapted to a student cast.

It1

LS FOR FRESH

TEAM POS PNED
Part of the trials were run off yes.
terday afternoon in the flght for plac-
es on the fresh team that goes
to Lansing Saturday, but definte set-
tlem nt of the men to compete has
been postponed until today. Trainer

Farrell was not pleased with the er, with a view of recommending the A portrait of Professor A. A. Stan-
showing made in many events, and at condemnation and retirement of types ley, of the University School of Music,,
the numbe'r out in white, so was un- regarded as unsafe. will be presented by the Choral Union
willing to base the choice of the team Bathing Question Also Discussed. to the University on the opening night
on yesterday's trials. The question of bathing was also of the May Festival, Wednesday, May
In the races that were contested brought up, and Prof. Wililams, in be- 14. Immediately after the Choral Un-
yesterday, the times and the winners half of the Edison company announced ion finishes singing the Laus Deo,
were not divulged by Farrell, as the the water in the mill race below Argo which has been composed by Profes-
work today will be the deciding fac- dam would not be high enough for sor Stanley especially for this May
tor. The keenness of the competition swimming. but he stated that the com- Festival, the portrait will be present-
was heightened by the presence of, pany would be willing to lease a bath-' ed by Samuel J. Hoexter, chairman of

eight members of the Toledo .High
school track team,. who have come to
Ann Arbor to gain some practice on
a track with a long' straight-away,
preparatory to entering the Cornell
invitation inter-scholajstic. Several
of the prep school athletes ran with
the freshies in their trials, and gave
them stiff races, although in no event
did they bring shame on the college
youngsters, by appropriating a first.

ing beach on the new Argo pond to a
university organization for a nominal
sum. The question of allowing swim-
ming in the lake above the Barton
dam was discussed, but it was decided
not to countenance bathing there, ow-
ing to the fact that most of the water
supply of the city is drawn from the
river at that point.
A second meeting will be held at
(Contirnued on page 4.)

the committee, to- President H. B.
Hutchins representing the university.!

The life size bust is painted on a!
canvas 25 by 30 inches. The frame Dr. Julius Stieglitz Talks Tonight.
is finished in old gold and has a width Dr. Julius Stieglitz, professor of
of five inches. Percy Ives, of Detroit, chemistry, of the University of Chica-
painted the portrait. go, will speak on "Combustion, or the
During the May Festival the paint- Electrolitic Theory of Oxidation" to-
ing will be on exhibition in the night at 8:00 o'clock in the chemical
Stearn's music room of Hill auditori- amphitheater. The lecture is open to
um. the public.

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