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April 30, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-30

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LV~~ MOMO ER IN

Th

ANN ARBOR

Michigan

Daily

REA:SD DAILY BY
5,004 STUDEN TS.

'VA7TTT

XX" No. 47

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CE

PRICE FIVE CE

__

suuTHERNERS

ARE TROUNCED
BY WIVERINES,
E3chigan '.l"iVi 4 ,d on Offerings
oM Wodon for Ia Safeties,
Driving 13 Tallies
A cross Pai.
ONLY ON E IENTUCKIAN IS
AI 0~ TO ET 1AST FIRST
$iskr Holdis (al el Scrls n
HitIcss rirsoiat Five
Kentucky and Michigan fought a
thrilling battle on Ferry field'yester-
day afternoon. In fact it was so thrill-
ing that the spectators could not stand

THE WEATHER MAN.
E'or ec ast for Ann Arbor-Wednes-
d'ay fair,
Untiversity Observatory--Tuesday,
7:00 p. i., temperature 49.2; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
58.0; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 35.7; average wind velocity,
12 miles per hour.

HOLD TRIALS FOR
CORNELL CONTEST

WOMEN MAY HAVE
STUDENT COUNCIL
Executive Board of Women's League
Will be Reorganized
May 10.

A

CLAISSES SHO10W PT11LST IN
IN INTER-31URAL BASEBALL.
Fresiman Squad ilas Large Number
of Cau dates; Contests Start
Friday.

OFFICERS FOR
BOAT CLUB TO
BE NOMINATEI

Sprinters and Broad Jumpers
Compete in Tryouts
Tqday.

Will

HAF MAY ENTER THREE EVENTS I DELEOA TES LEAVE FOR MADISON-.

PERCIVAL V. BLA NSHARD TO
SPEAK A T OBERLIN FRIDA
Percival V Blanshard, '14, whos
brother Paul won the Interstate Peac
contest last week, will represent Mich
igan in the Northern Oratorica
League contest at Oberlin, Ohio, Fri
day evening.,
He will deliver his oration, "Chris
tianity and tho Social Crisis," with
which he won the university contes
last summer, at a public rehearsa
Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Prof. Trueblood will accompany
BLianshard to the contest, the men
leaving Thursday e, ening. There will
be seven schools represented, the ord-
-r of speaking being as follows: Ober-
lin, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Minne-
sota, Michigan ,and Northwestern.

the strain and by the time the, las
Colonel- had done the shuffle there was
nobody left but the score keepers in
the press stand who were subsisting on
half-ration peanuts and calling for
lights. The southern gentlemen did
the best they knew how to hustle the
game along, 20 of them whiffing and
only one reaching second, but the Wol-
verines found something soft in Wood-
son and fattened up their averages in
great style. When the shades of night
drew their soft curtain o'er the battle
field the score was 13 to nothing.
For the first portion of the game Mr.
Sisler occupied the entire center of the
stage for the first five innings. This
port side deceiver decided that a team
was an unnecessary appendage and
hence proceeded to make 15 put outs
in five innings, not asking his co-labor-
ers for any assistance. Fourteen of
the Colonels came to bat, smiled feeb-
ly. swung gently three times, and hik-
ed Lack to the quiet bench, proving
their southern breeding. The other
victim, a rough person, hit one to Sis-
ler who likewise gently touched him
out About the only bet in these five
inings was how many balls would be
thrown in one inning, and low calcu-
lators won.
In the wings of the stage were two
able assistants of Mr. Sisler in the
shape of Messrs Pontius and Bell.
'xielding a club like Tom Lovell deliv-
ering a lioem, this pair each garnered
four bingles and drove In some of the
baker's dozen of tally slips that Rick-
:y is collecting. It was only in the last
nning that "Brute" failed to connect
and then he didn't have the heart to
abuse the confidence of the tr-usting
Mr. Woodson .with his plate splitters.
Sisler flashed once in the ballet of hit-
ters, driving out a home run just tb get
out the kinks and Mr. Baker also made
a hurried trip around the sacks with-
out a stopover. Sixteen hits were
harvested before 24 had succumbed,
and Rickey had caused several accom-
panied score keepers irate frenzy by
sending in a half dozen substitutes.
After Sisler had cowed the Colonels
into gentle slumber and the strike out
habit, Quaintance took up the burden
and held them scoreless although
yielding three delayers. He fanned
six and held them safe at all times, the
visitors getting eie man to second]
where he died unnoticed in the gather-i
ing dusk. Taken all in all the south-
erners were not a particularly impos-
ing ball club. Whatever may.be their
reputation in the land of rye and hors-
es, they looked like a Friday night only
tenor at the May Festival when stack-
ed up against Michigan. A total of nine
misplays were chalked up against them
and only one really good play marked
their work. They were simply out-
classed and Michigan scored at will
after the first three innings.
In the fourth inning the procession
started when four hits, two of them
bacon getters for four sacks, brought
in five runs. In the fifth, three hits
mixed with five errors counted four
(Continued from page 1.)
Union andidates Will Not Campaign.0
Campaigning in the election for
Michigan Union, officers for the next
school year was barred by a resolu-'
tion of the board of directors of that
organization, at its meeting yesterday
noon. The sentiment of the members
of the board was unanimously opposed
to any form of solicitation on the part

PLAN TO ENTERTAIN
"PREP"S ATHLETES
Relay Races and Fimal Interclass
Baseball Game to Be Staged
at Interscholastic.
VISITORS WILL GET ALTO RIDE.
Because of the calling off of'the dual
meet between the Wolverines and Cal-
ifornia track men, which was to have
taken place on the morning of May 24,
the second day of the interscholastic,
it is probable that the high school ath-
letes will be entertained by a series
of relays between teams picked from
the Varsity track squad, and the final
game of the interclass baseball series.
Among the other features of the en-
tertainment which is being tentatively
planned for the prep school stars, are
automobile rides either Friday after-
noon or Saturday and an interscholas-
tic dinner on Saturday night follow-
ing the meet, at which time the star
point-winners may be awarded the
medals and trophies won.
There will be a meeting of all try-
outs for the office of interscholastic
manager tonight at 8:00 o'clock at
the athletic association. The new sys-
tem of tryouts for Varsity manager-
ships does not apply to candidates for
the interscholastic position. The three
men who do- the best work between
now and just before the meet will be
appointed on the interscholastic com-
mittee and those chosen will do the
bulk of the work for the big event.
E-NGWNEERING PROFESSORS
INVESTIGATE "CAT HOLE."
Profs. E. D. Rich and W. C. Had of
the engineering department will begin
the investigation of the old "Cat Hole"
today, with the view of finding out the
possibility of beautifying it, and trans-
forming it into an open air amphithe-
ater.
Attention was called to the unsani-
tary condition of the hole by the san-
itation committee of the Ann Arbor
Civic association at a meeting Monday
night, and the increase of mosquitoes
in the city during the past summers
has made it necessary for the commit-
tee to act,
COMMERCE CLUB LEAVES ON
ANNUAL JUNKET TOMORROW
Members of the Commerce club will
leave Detroit tomorrow night for
Cleveland on the annual spring tour of
inspection. The 20 men who intend to
make the trip will meet at the wharf
at the foot of Wayne street in time to
get the 10:45 'clock boat for Cleve-
land.
The itinerary of the trip includes an
inspection of important industrial con-
cerns, including the Sherwin Williams
Paint Company's factory, a tour of
May's department store and the Cleve-
land Plain Dealer. The men will return'
Shome Sunday

Uncertain of the out-door powers of First steps toward the formation of
his squad of track candidates, Trainer a women's student council will be tak
Farrell will stage trials this afternoon en May 10, when the reorganization o
e to give him some definite idea of the the executive board of the Women'
emnenwho can be relied upon for points League will be made. Amendments t
- in the struggle with Cornell. These the constitution will be offered to pro-
l trials will be confined to the sprints vide for a committee of self-govern
and broad jump. ment, to which shall be referred all de
"Steve" is now in a quandary con- batable questions relative to the wom
cerning the races in which he will en of the campus. Final action will b
h utilize Capt. Haff, the quarter-mile, the taken at the annual elections to b
t half-mile, and the two-twenty sprint, held about May 25, when the report o
1 all being possibilities* It is the ap- delegates from the Student Govern-
parent weakness of Michigan in the ment association meeting in Madiso
sprints that has led him to consider this week will be made.
running Haff in a distance shorter than Some students have been strongly in
his regular 440 yards. Versatility is favor of a reorganization of the ex-
a strong trait with this flier, as he has ecutive board of the League because
demonstrated himself to be the fastest of the unequal representation of its
man in the school in distances ranging members. At present the board is
from 220 to 880 yards. In addition to composed of 22 members, of these 11
the possibility of appearing in the are delegates from the 11 sororities
sprint, it is probable that Haff will al- and the other half represent the 600
so'eompete in the role of a quarter and independent women of the university.
half-miler. The new scheme proposes to enlarge
Although the pole-vaulters and the the number of delegates of the
broad-jumpers have been slow in mak- 600 by qualifying a League
ing condition, the recent weather has house as one in which the
boosted them along to the extent that majority of women are independents.
it now appears that they can be count- Those women not associated with
d on for seconds if not firsts. Both League houses or sororities are to be
Waring and Cohn,who have been doubt- entitled to two delegates at large.
ful in their studies, have been declared Winifred Mahon and Catherine Reig-
free for competition and will enter hard, president and chairman of the
today's trials. Kohler is increasing his social committee respectively of the
hammer throwing distance, and is cer- Women's League, leave today for Mad-
tain to return with two firsts attached ison to attend a meeting of the Student
to his belt, the other cinch being the Government association. These dele-
shot-put. gates will report at the annual League
No relays will be on the program at meeting and from these reports plans
Ithaca, which pleases Trainer Farrell will be drawn. up for a permanent
as he is confident that his men can win council to be chosen from the mem-
without five points from this source. bes of the new executive board.
PRES. HUTCHINS.WILL NOT EDWIN E. SLOSSON TO GIVE
ATTEND PEACE CONFERENCE LECTURES ON JOURNALISM
President Harry B. Hutchins will be Edwin E. Slosson, managing editor
unable to attend the fourth peace con- of the New York Independent, who is
ference at St. Louis on Thursday and conducting Prof. F. N. Scott's classes
Friday. He has been in the east for this week, will deliver a lecture on the
the last week and is now in New York use of illustration in the newspaper at
city on private business, but will re- 10:00 o'clock this morning in room
turn to Ann Arbor tomorrow. 206 . west hall. He will discuss the
Governor Ferris had appointed Pres- value of statistics and figures in pre-
ident Emeritus James B. Angell to rep- senting a news story, illustrating his
resent the state of Michigan at the address with examples.
conference but Dr. Angell has found "Science and Journalism" will be the
it inadvisable to attempt the long trip. subject of another address which Mr.
President Hutchins was to be one Slosson will deliver tomorrow morn-
of the leaders of a discussion on the ing at 10:00 o'clock in the same room.
universities and the peace movement The lecture will deal with the meth-
along with a number of college pres- ods used in writing up popular science
idents. No one has been delegated by notes, and is the same one which Mr.
him to take his place and so the Uni- Slosson gave last week at Columbia
versity of Michigan will not be repre- before the Pulitzer school of journal-
sented at the conference. ism. of which he is an associate. Both
lectures will be open to the public.
Junior Lits Will Hold Class Meeting
Junior lits will hold a class meeting Seats for Verein Play Sell Rapidly.
at 4:00 o'clock this afternoon, in the More than 200 seats haye been sold
west physics lecture room, at which during the advance seat sale of the
.time the honor system will come up Deutscher Verein play, which will be
for discussion. Appointments for the presented at the Whitney theater, Fri-
freshman advisory committee will be day evening, May 9. Seats are on sale
made, and the finances of the class every day from 4:00 to 5:00 o'clock at
for the past year will be explained. Wahr's bookstore.
The most comic role in "Koeper-
DRAWINGS OF ORSON LOWELL nickerstrasse 120" is played by
ARE PLACED ON EXHIBITION Lawrence Clayton, '15, who takes the
part of Karl Brosha, a wealthy German
Orson Lowell's original drawings landlord.
and illustrations, of the Jebb family
and several other "Life" favorites are BUSRAH FUND CAMPAIGN IS
now on exhibition in the upper lecture MEETING HEARTY RESPONSE
room of Memorial hall. The draw-
ings were delayed in arriving, and Reports from the general chairmen
consequently the time during which of the Busrah committee, whohave
they can be seen here has been short- been canvassing among the students
ened. Memorial hall will be open dur- for two weeks, assure the Y. M. C. A.
ing the day and on Wednesday and authorities that the total sum collect-
Friday evenings from 7:30 to 9:00 ed for medical and industrial aid in
o'clock. The exhibit will be taken to Arabia will reach $2,000 before June.
another city on May 10. The total turned in up to yesterday
was $1,600, but as yet only the men in
Formulate Plans to Beautify Hillside, charge of the literary and law depart-
Plans were formulated at a commit- ments have made reports on their

tee meeting of the Ann Arbor Civic work.
Improvement association last night to!
beautify the hillside sloping from the Measles Epidemic is Now Nearly Over.
rear of the Kappa Sigma and Sigma The epidemic of measles in Ann Ar-
Phi fraternity houses to the Michigan bor which has existed since January,
Central tracks with trees and shrubs. numbering 300 cases, is now under
This step was deemed necessary ow- control of the health department. At
ing to the prominence of the hillside. the present time there are 18 cases.

9
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Judging from the list of eligible men
handed in to Coach Douglas by the in-
terclass baseball managers, the class
teams will stage some real live battles
this season. The lists are long, and
contain the names of many former
class stars together with a host of
new material.
The eligibility rules did not have any
great effect upon the men of the
squads, and most of the contenders for
positions will be allowed to compete.
Nearly all the men were declared
physically able to take part in the na-
tional pastime by Dr. May.
Freshmen squads are especially
large this year, and if the beginners,
live up to their reputations the older
nines will have no little trouble in
keeping them from the upper berth.
The first games will be played Fri-
day afternoon at 4:05 o'clock, when the
fresh and soph lits will cross bats,
and at the same time the fresh laws
And the pharmics will settle the ques-.
tion of which one will play the win-
ners in the senior-junior law game,
Monday, May 12.l
ENTIRE ORCHESTRA
TO APPEAR HERE
Full Thomas Organization Will Be
Heard at Festival For
First Time.

Installed at Mass
Meeting.
WORK OF MARKING CHANNEL
WILL BE STARTED AT ONC.
Michigan Union Board of Directo:
Approves of Proposed
Constitution.
Nominations for officers of the ne
Michigan Union Boat club will be ar
nounced at the general mass meetir
to be held tonight at the Union at 7:(
o'clock. All who are interested in th
formation of the club are urged by th
committee to be present at this timf
although only active members of th
Union may become members of th
new organization.
The meeting will be called to orde
at 7:00 o'clock by Pres. Kemp of th
Union, and after short talks by men
bers of the committee, explaining th
work and prospects of the club, th
constitution will be submitted fo
adoption, the officers will be electe
and installed, and the plans for thi
spring will be discussed.
Prof. W. P. Lombard, an old Harvar
man an enthusiastic supporter c
aquatic sports, will talk on the possi
bilities of the club, and the grea
chances for the development of wate
sports here.
The officers will begin their wort
at once,and preparations for the mark
ing of the dangerous places in th
channel will go forward without delay
The shallows will be marked by mean
of buoys, the rocks will be roped off
and signs of warning placed whereve
necessary. This part of the work, the
members of the engineering depart
ment have volunteered to do.
The proposed constitution for the
Tlub was approved by the board of di
rectors of the Michigan Union at thei:
meeting yesterday afternoon, and al
that remains now is the approval o
the student body at the mass meeting
tonight.

Oflicials of
Will

Proposed Orgar
Be Elected and

THEODORE STOCK TO CONDUCT.
For the first time in all the years
that the Thomas orchestra of Chicago
has played at the May Festival, Ann
Arbor will hear practically the entire
organization. Formerly only the trav-,
eling orchestra of 50 pieces has come
here, but this year it will be augment-
ed by more than a score of players

i
E
tt
t
C
T
r
<
r
E
'r

Frederick Stock, Conductor.
brought from Chicago, so that practi-
cally the entire orchestra as it ap-
>ears in Orchestra Hall in Chicago will
be heard.
The increased size of the new audi-
torium, and the selection of a program
which can be more effectively render-
ed by the full organization, makes the
larger orchestra necessary.
DR. ANGELL TO BE SPEAKER
AT COSMOPOLITAN BANQUET

Dr. James B. Angell will speak on
"What the Foreign' Students Mean to
Michigan and What Michigan Means
to Them," at the international banquet
of the Cosmopolitan club to be held at
Newberry hall Thursday night. Regent
J. E. Beal will talk on the "Attitude of
.the Regents towards the Foreign Stu-
dents," Professor J. A. Bursley Will
speak on "The Relation of Advisors
to Foreign Students," and Prof. J. A.
C. Hildner on the "New Board of Di-
rectors." Mr. A. C. Jennings will talk
on the "Possibilities of the New Club
House." George A. Burke, '47L, will'
act as toastmaster.
The musical program will include
Kenneth Westerman, '13, who will sing
several Indian songs, and Marten Ten
Horn, '13, with Mark Wisdom, '13, willi
play a mandolin and violin duet,.fea-
turing foreign music. .
Tickets are limited to 100 and must
be secured in advance from members
of the social committee at 60 cents.
each.

ELECT R. BRAUN PRESIDENT
OF ENGINEERING SOCIETY.
issociation to Hold Annual Banquet
at Michigan Union
Tonight.
Officers for next year were elected'
by the Engineering society last night.
The men chosen were, president, R.
H. Braun, '14; vice-president, A. T.
Ricketts, '15; corresponding secretary,
H. C. Wickes, '13; recording secretary,
S. B. Douglas, '14; treasurer, B. C.
Budd, '15; librarian, A. B. Frederick,
'14; registrar, H. F..Hutzel, '15; senior
members of the executive committee,
C. W. Howell, and T. N. Robie; junior
member of the executive committee,
O. W. Hall.
The president-elect will, speak at
the society's annual banquet which
will be held at the Michigan Union at
5:30 o'clock today. Don Daron, '13,
will act as toastmaster. Speakers -on
the program are, W. V. Alford, the lec-
turer on South America, professor H.
C. Anderson, W. S. Hopkin, '13, and
James E. Hancock, '13. Music will be
. part of the program.
Tickets for the dinner are 75 cents,
and may be obtained at the Union at
5:30 o'clock.
UNION TO PUBLISH BOOKLET
CONTAINING MICHIGAN SONGS
K. C. Haven, '13E, was appointed
yesterday by President Edward G.
Kemp, of the Michigan Union, to com-
pile a booklet of Michigan songs. It is
planned to use the publication at sings
to be held at the Union in the future,
for the purpose of acquainting the stu-
dent tody more intimately with Varsi-
ty melodies.
The booklet will be published by the
Union and will not be generally dis-
tributed. It will not contain the mu-
sic for the songs.

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