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April 27, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-27

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ORNING PAPER IN
ANN AMBOR

The

Ml0igan

Daily

READ DAILYBY
5,009 STUDENTS.

MMMMOMMMh.

t

.,. . i

XXIII, No. 145.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 27, 1913.

PRICE FIVE t

PRICE FIVE (
m

'NO LIQUOR TO STUDENTS",
IS COUNCIL'S ULTIMATUM

Science Committee Tells Saloonkeep-
ers That "Blue" Law Enacted in
1907 Will Be Strictly
Enforced.
REVOKING OF LICENSES TO
BE PENALTY OF VIOLATION.

University Authorities1
Behind ProsecutorI
in the Work.

Will
Burke

Stand

No more spirituous or intoxicating
liquors are to be sold to students, is
the ultimatum issued to the saloon-
.keepers by the license committee of
the city common council at a meeting
called for the purpose of warning the
saloon men, in the city hall last night.
The statute enacted by the state legis-
lature in 1907, and up to the present
time a dead letter, so far as local liq-
uor dealers were concerned, is to be
enforced by Prosecutor George Burke,
'07L. In the crusade he will be assisted
by the city officials, and has been
promised aid by President H.B. Hutch-
ins, speaking for the university au-
thorities.
President Hutchins could not be ap-
proached in person by Chairman Sink
of the license committee, but a tele-
gram forwarded to him by Secretary
Shirley Smith informed him of the
situation, and the following reply was
received: "University will stand by the
city in revoking licenses."
The meeting held last night was at-
tended by the proprietors of the 29'
saloons, and Chairman Sink informed
the assembly that violations of the
liquor law in regard to selling intox-
icants to students would cause saloon
licenses to be forfeited by the offend-

ing saloonists. He stated that the
committee had no discretionary pow-
ers, but was bound to enforce the'stat-
ute as long as it was in force.
Many of the saloon men protested
that the law was an injustice to them.
They insisted that it was impossible
for them to distinguish students from
other transient customers, and its en-
forcement would cause them no end of
inconvenience.
Prosecutor Burke replied to the
protests by acknowledging the pecul-
iar situation in which the saloonmen
are placed,, but assured them that no
unfair advantage would be taken in
the enforcement of the law.
"I am not a policeman," he said. "I
will not maintain an espionage upon
you men, but will act only on com-
plaints properly filed with me. Such.
complaints must be made with suffi-
cient evidence to warrant conviction
before I will act.
Mayor R. McKenzie, who was pres-
ent at the meeting, stated his position
by promising support to the prosecu-
tor and license committee, and declar-
ed that the university must co-operate
in order to properly carry out the en-
forcement of the liquor law.
"The saloonkeepers are in a legiti-
mate business," he said, "and the
brunt should not be left for them to
bear. The university should assist by
expelling students, if necessary, who
are guilty of frequenting saloons."
The constitutionality of the law was'
discussed and it was intimated that a
test case may be made. In order to
bring such a case before the supreme
court, conviction of one of the local
saloon men for violation of the law
(Continued on page 4.)

FELD POEM PRIZE DIVIDED
BETWEEN TWO CONTESTANTS
Two ot the poemssbmaiitted ilz cOi
petition for the Nelson C. Field poetry
contest are so nearly equal in merit
that the judges have determined to di-
vide the prize, awarding $50 to each
of the authors.
Martin Feinstein, '13, with a poem
entitled "Ben Saul," and Edgar A.
Mower, '13, with a poem entitled "Bar-
naby," were the sucessful men among
the thirteen contestants who submit-
ted manuscripts.
In 1911 the prize was also divided be-
tween two men, Ralph Block, '11, and
Henry C. Bogle, '11, receiving the
award. Last year George Oliver
Spaulding, '12, was the recipient; but
no award was made in 1910.
Speaks at Episcopal Church Today.
Bishop Chauncey Brewster of Con-
necticut will speak at St. Andrew's
Episcopal church at 10:30 o'clock this
morning.
RAIN PEET
CONTEST WITH
GEORGIAN TEA M
Downpour, Lasting Nearly All I)y,
Gave No Chance to Stage Ganle
Which Promised to Be Great
Pitching Dueh.
THREE BATTLES SCHEDULEDI
AT HOME FOR COMING WEEK.

PLAYGRUND MEETING IS
CALLED FORTOMORROW
Tosaisfy the demand of the new
playground movement in supplying
cach school in the city with supervis-
ors a meeting will be held in the high
school tomorrow evening at 7:30
o'clock. All interested in the move-
ment are invited to attend. The mat-
ter is to be taken up among the stu-
dents by Mr. H. Apple, physical direct-
or in the high school.
Great things may be expected for
the movement which has been inau-
gurated here, according to Mr. H. M.
Slaiuson, Supt. of schools in the city.
"Of course, the present plan is an
experiment," said Mr. Slauson last
night. "Just what its advantages and
disadvantages are, have not been
brought out, but I expect much per-
manent good from the scheme. The
plan of playground work, generally
speaking, is a most salutary one, and
I shall certainly give it my hearty sup-
port."

MICHIGAN WINS TWO MILE
RELAY, SETTING NEW MARY
Time, 8:00, Betters Old Record By 2-5 0
Second; Freshmen Follow Penn
In Mile Race
KOHLER GETS 2,3,_AND 4 N -WEIGHT
PHILADELPHIA, PA., April 26.-A record breaking first place in the
two mile relay, second place in the, freshmen mile relay, a second, third and
fourth for Kohler in the weight events, and fifth for Sargent in the high
jump, was the excellent showing Michigan made at the Penn games today.
Establishing a new collegiate record of 8 minutes flat in the two mile
relay championships, Michigan's quartet composed of Brown, Jansen, Haim-
baugh and Capt. Haff, ran away from Dartmouth and Virginia and lived up
to Trainer "Steve" Farrell's predictions that the Michigan team is the fast-
est that ever stepped onto the Franklin field track. The former mark in the
event was 8:00 2-5, established= by Pennsylvania.
Michigan's freshmen mile team also brought laurels to Michigan in that
the quartet of youngsters was awarded second in the freshmen event, though
the winning of second came about in a peculiar manner. When everything
was ready to start the mile relay for freshmen, the Michigan representatives
were not on the field. Pennsylvania won the event In the record breaking
time of 3:25 2-5,bettering the old mark of 3:26 4-5 held by Illinois. Colum-
bia won second.
It then developed, that the Michigan runners had not heard the call for
the race, and to-make matters right, the lads representingthe Maize and Blue
were allowed to run against time. The Wolverine runners negotiated the
distance in 3:34 4-5, and as this bettered Columbia's mark, Michigan was
given seecond in the event. .It is doubtful if the Michigan freshmen could
have won better than second in the event, even if they'had run in the real
competition, although it is probable that their time would have been much
better. .Meridith, the phenominal Penn freshman was a member of the Red
and Blue team.
In Michigan's individual competition, Kohler distinguished himself by
taking a second, third and fourth, though Sargent failed to win better than
fifth inhis event, the high jump, Kohler was nosed out by Beatty of Columbia
in the shot put. Beatty heaved the weight 46 feet 3 1-2 inches, while Koh-
ler's bast put was 45 feet 10 1-2. In the hammer throw, Kohler's heave of
150 feet 4 inches won third place for him, while in the discus throw, Kohler
made a distance of 126 feet 5 1-2 inches for fourth. In the high jump, Sar-
gent was firced out of the competition at 6 feet. Richards of Brigham Young
university won the event at 6 feet 2 inches.

NOMINATIONS

UNION OFFICES
Comiaitee, headed by George Burgess,
113i, Selects Candidates For
Next College
Year.
&t S. DICKINSON, L. P. HALLER
AND U. I® 10111tFOR PRESIDENT

Kentucky, Pittsburg and Case Oppose Dean I.M.Biates and Profs. H.C.Adams
Varsity on Tuesday, Thursday and It, Peterson as Faculty
and Saturday. Advisors.
i -
The weeping condition of the skies Nominations for officers of the Mich-
yesterday prevented a pitching duel igan Union for the 1913-'14 college

N, Y, AL I HAVE
MANY PLACES OPEN
Opportunities for several University
of Michigan graduates in New York
have been obtained by the University
of Michigan club of that city. They
are as follows:
Law graduate with good credentials
from Dean H. M. Bates, can find em-
ployment with an old Brooklyn firm,
provided he is> a member of the New
York Bar, or is prepared to pass its
examination.
Law graduate with credentials from
Dean H. M. Bates, can find employ-
ment in the legal departmeit of a large
corporation. He must be able to as-
sume the responsibility for the firm's
real estate.
Several graduates are wanted as stu-
dents in the offices of advertising
agencies. Prospects are offered for
promotion to field positions as heads
of branch offices.
Graduate. with training in municipal
sanitation is wanted to fill the posi-
tion of health officer in a small New
Jersey city.
Electrical engineering graduate with
experience in handling orders,is want--;
ed by an important electrical manu-
facturing company.r
the Michigan Union and the Y. M. C.a
A., is wanted by a company in Quebec,i
Canada, to, organize social welfarec
work among the 1,500 young men
which it employs. A good salary isf
promised to a man of ability and char-
acter, who can meet these require-t
ments.1
Earl D. Babst, president of the Uni-t
versity of Michigan club of New York,
will gladly give any further informa-
tion desired. He may be addressed at
409 West 15 street, New York city. t

NO OBJECTION MADE
TO SEAT RESERVAL
The plan for the reservation of seats
at baseball games for all seniors who
carry canes has met with general cam-
pus approval, and as yet, no objec-
tions to the scheme have been present-
ed. The practicability of the plan in
the eyes of. the athletic authorities,
which was supposed to be the great-
est difficulty to overcome by those who
are advocating the class distinction, is
almost assured.
"I see no reason why this privilege
should not be granted to seniors, pro-
viding they want it," said Director P.
G. Bartelme yesterday. "I am quite
sure that the plan will meet with no
objections on the part of the athletic
authorities and there is no reason why
students of the other classes should
object to the proposed addition to sen-
ior privileges. - If the seniors desire it,
the question of prmanent reservation
of a block of seats will be brought up
at the next meeting of the board of
directors."
Since the question will not be set-
tled definitely before the Kentucky
game, if requested, the athletic author-
ities will reserve a block of four hun-
dred at this contest. In this case, the
roping off and the seating of the sen-
iors will be under the direction of this
class. 0
Tom Lovell To Speak in Detroit Today
Dr. Tom Lovell will speak in De-
troit today under the management of
Railroad Jack. He will tell of his
trials in England, his journey to Can-
ada, and how he stopped at Ann Arbor,
with a full recognition of his debt of
gratitude to Michigan and her stu-
dents.

I1

on Ferry field, and gave yearning fans
a chance to sit around and talk dope
instead of seeing a game. Sisler, the
off side flinger, was scheduled to hook
up with Corley, the lengthy Georgia
deceiver, who gave such a fine exhibi-
tion on Wednesday. The go would have
been worth while, but energetic weath..
(Continued on page 4.)

year were made public last night by
the Union nominating committee, of
which George Burgess, '13L, is chair-
man. The election will occur May 17,
and the usual regulations in regard
to non-campaigning will prevail.
The following men were selected to
run:
(Continued on page 4.)

BLANCHARD BROTHERS
WIN ORATORY PRIZES
Ten straight victories in oratorical then on, oratorical competition has
contests-such is the record of the been rather one sided. During the
Blanshard twins for the University spring vacation he won the state Peace
of Michigan in the last two years. contest at, Lansing, and later brought
Paul B. Blanshard and Percival V. honors to his alma mater by winning
Blanshard, both junior literary stu- the, national Peace contest at Lake
dents from Detroit, have "literally had Mohawk.
a monopoly of the honors of the speak- It was during the spring vacation
ing platform since they entered col- last year, also, that Paul began his
lege. .exploits, going to Olivet, all unknown
In addition to their oratorical tri- to the University authorities, and win-
umphs, Percival was awarded a Rhod- ning the state prohibition contest.
es scholarship last December, and This year Percival Blanshard was
Paul was a member of the Chicago de- appointed by the oratorical board to
bating team last fall. Percival will represent the university in the Hamil-
leave for Oxford in September, but his ton Oratorical contest, but it was later
brother, according to the members of decided to hold a contest, and he with-
the oratory department, seems likely drew, entering the university oratori-
to follow closely in his brother's foot- cal contest on March 21.
steps in both the Northern League Ie won this contest unanimously,
contests. the first time in 23 years these events
Last year Percival won the universi- have been held in which such a decis-
ty Peace oratorical contest, and from (Continued on rage 4.)

BAND STATES "NO
SPRING CONCERTS"
For the first time in many years no
band spring concerts will be held on
the campus. Even if the athletic asso-
ciation should appropriate $800 for
the support of the organization it
would not be, possible for concerts to
be given, as the band has had no prac-
tice since lastA fall.
"It would be impossible for the band
to give any concerts this spring even
though the board of .control of athlet-
ics does provide for our future" said
Ike Fischer, leader of the band, last
night. "We might probably be able to
play at several of the Saturday after-
noon baseball games because the march
music is simple, but concert' music
takes weeks of practice to perfect and
we have not been together since the
Cornell game." '
It is a possibility that the musical
clubs might be induced to take the
band's place this spring, although*
no official o-f that organization could
be reached last night to verify the
statement.
MUSICAL NUMBERS WILL
FEATURE UNION PROGRAM
A program of musical numbers and;
possibly a speaker has been arranged
for members of the Union this after-
noon, at 3:00 o'clock. Stanley T.Mills,
'13E, and Russell H. Mills, '14E, will
play a mandolin duet, accompanied by,
Laurence Holmboe, '13E, on the gui-
tar. Wm. H. Altman, '14E, and S. L.
Adelsdorf, '14L will present a piano7
and clarinet duet. Several other mu-t
sical numbers will.amso be given.

CHINESE TO HOLD
" -PRAYER SERVICE
Members of the Chinese Studen-ts'
club will hold a prayer service this
afternoon at 4:00 o'clock in McMillan
hall., in accordance with an order
from the republic which was sent to
all parts of China and also to Secre-
tary of State Bryan. President-emer-
itus James B. Angell will' also speak
on "The Opportunities and Responsi-
bilities of the Chinese Students," and
the regular Sunday lecture on the
problems prepared by the members,
will be given by the Right Rev. Chaun-
cey B. Brewster.
The order for the, service, in the
form in which it was sent to the Chin-
ese districts is as follows:
"Prayer is requested for the Nation-
al Assembly now in session, for the
new Government, for the president
who is to be elected, for the constitu-
tion of the Republic that the country
may be recognized by the powers,
that peace may reign within our coun-
try, that strong and virtuous men may
be elected to office, ,and that the gov-
ernment may be established upon a
very strong foundation. Upon receipt
of this telegram you are 'equested to
notify all the churches in your prov-
ince that April 27th has been set aside
as a day of prayer for the nation. Let
us all take part."
Depict Glee Club on Western Tour.
"Michigan Glee in a Sleeping Car,
or the Terrors of. a Three Weeks'
Tour" is the title of a feature story ap-
pearing in this morning's Detroit Trib-
une, which describes the recent trip
of the musical club to the Pacif-
ic coast.

l
1
t
c
t

1IrebytrtanCburch
10:30 Sermon by Rev. L. A. Burrett. Subject: "The Man
Blind."
12:10 PROF. F. W.KRLSEY. "Underground Rome"

Born

I ..

I UNION GUILD

Rt. Rev.

Chauncey
BISHOP OF CONNECTICUT

Brewster

EPISCOPAL

SERIES
APRIL 27

CHURCH

Subject:
"CHRISTIANITY, ALVIGPROPHET"

7:45 P.

I

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