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April 26, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-ORNING IPAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

The

9a0

Daily

READ' DAILY BY
5,000 STUDENTS.

w

PRICE FIVE CENT

, No. 144.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 1913.

REGENTS PASS
PROVISION TO
REFUND FEES
Measure Adopted Allowing Student
Who Leaves University Ilefore
End of First Semester
Refund.
RAISE ANNUL FEES ONE
DOLLAR FOR NEW RULING.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Saturday,
fair and cooler.
University Observatory, Friday, 7:00
p. in., temperature 51.0; maximum
temperature, 24 hours preceding, 78.0;
minimum temperature, 24 -hours pre-
ceding, 51.0; average wind velocity,
9 miles per hour.
WOMEN WARBLERS
TO HOLD CONCERT
Women's Glee Club to Hold Annual
Song Fest and Dance
Tonight.
MORE THAN 40 TO TAKE PART.

OLANSHARD0 IS ASS CIATION
VICTORIOUS IN AID IN SIGHT
Michigan Man Wins the Inter-State AUthough Regents Decide Against Ap-
Contest at Goshen, Ind.; Wis- projpriation Attitude of the
cousin Taking Athletic Officials is
Second. Promising..

Work on Organ Progresses.
Several new men have been added
to the force already at work upon the
construction of the organ in Hill Me-
morial Auditorium. 4000 pipes are
yet to be removed from University
b-all and 600 new ones are on their
way from the factory. These, when
set in place, will complete the organ.
The work will be completed within
two weeks so that everything will be
in readiness for the May Festival,
which starts May 14.
FRENCH THESPIANS
ACHIEVE SUCCESS

PEACHES WILL
TACKLE SISLER
IN COMEBACK
Georgia Returns Today in Endeavor
to Wipe Out Defeat of
Last Wednesday by
" Varsity.
SLIGHT SHIFT IN LINEUP DUE
TO ACCIDENT IN PRACTICE.

Will

Represent Central States in In eouritimeBnd "emains in a" " is-
Oratorical Contest at couraged.Condition Awaiting
Lake Mohonk.r Results.

Fifteen University Fellowships
Awarded and Minor Details
Settled.

Are

A refund of fees in case a studentI

leaves the university before the end
of the first semester was granted by
the board of regents at its session of
yesterday morning. In previous years
if a student left before the end of the
first semester no part of what he had
paid was refunded except in unusual
cases upon the action of the board.
The refund will be upon the follow-
ing basis, 40 per cent of the amount
paid for the year's fee if a student
leaves before the end of the first sem-
eater, and if a student enters for the
second semester only, or any part
thereof, only 60 per cent of the annual
fee is required.
The additional fee of $2.00 for li-
brary, athletic blanket tax of $5.00
and the new one of $2.00 for medical
service were lumped together and the
board decided to increase the univer-
sity fee in each instance $10.00. The
increase in fees will amount to $1.00
more than the extra fees will figure
up and the regents arranged to put
this additional dollar per student into
a fund from which students who .do
not stay for an entire year may be
reimbursed.
Award Fellowships for 1913-14.
The board awarded the 15 universi-
ty fellowships for the year 1913-'14.
The recipients of the five $500 fellow-
ships are as follows:
Gilbert H. Taylor, A.B.., De Pauw
University, 1909, classical languages;
Robert L. Jickling, B.S., Michigan,
1911, chemistry; Mary Yost, A.B., Vas-
sar College, 1904, A.M., ibid 1912, rhet-
oric; Clyde L. Queen, Ph.B, Adrian
College, 1912, political science; Carle-
ton V. Kent, B.S., State U. of Iowa,
k 1904, M.S., ibid, 1904, physics.
The 10 $300 fellowships were award-
ed the following: ,.
Hessel E. Ynterna, A.B., Hope Col-
lege, 1912, political science; H. V.
Foulk, A.B., Kansas University, 1910,
A.M., Michigan, 1911, psychology;
Floyd B. Streetor, A.B., Kansas Uni-
versity, 1911, A.M. ibid, 1912, history;
Alvalyn E. Woodward, Ph.B., U. of
Rochester, 1905, M.S., ibid, 1911, zool-
ogy; Herman A. Clark, A.B., Michigan
1909, A.M. ibid, 1910, classical .lan-
guage; Joseph E. DeCamp, B.S., Ar-
kansas College, 1905, A.M., Michigan,
1912, psychology;Leroy M. Coffin, A.B.,
Maine 1903, mathematics; Ernest F.
Barker, B.S., Rochester 1908, physics;
Dorothy M. Brown, A.B., Michigan
1911, political economy; Susan R.
Benedict, B.S., Smith College 1895,
'A.M., Columbia University 1906, math-
ematics.'
Transact Much Minor Business.
The proposition to send the Mich-
iganensian to the high schools of the
state was laid on the table by the
board.
Secretary Smith was authorized to
make a contract for lantern slides for
the coming year.
The committee's recommendation in
regard to the right of way of the spur
track to the new power house was ac-
cepted with one or two modifications
as to the speed limit and the road
bed,
Professor Herbert J. Goulding was

Forty women will take part in the
annual concert and dance of the wom-
en's glee club in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall this evening at 8:00 o'clock. An
extra week of rehearsing has been put
on the selections, due to postpone-
ment. The features are the Darky
melody and the clock selection. The
complete program follows:
Selections by the Glee Club:
To Michigan ...... Charles Vincent
Rose in the Bud .........Forster
Dinah Doe .. ......J... L. Mallory
Piano Solo by Elizabeth Rohns:
Polonaise.................Chopin
Melodie .............. Moskowski
Selections by the Glee Club:
Glad and Sad Aake Rhyme, my
Dear ...............F. Syne
Looks and Eyes ...... J. L. Roeckel
Trio--

c
1
t
1
t

(Special to the Michigan Daily.) Although the petition for a yearly
GOSHEN, INDIANA, April 25.- appropriation for the Varsity band
Paul Blanshard, of the University of wassdenied by the board of regents
Michigan, won the interstate Peace yesterday, it is practically certain that
the organization will be provided for
contest here tonight. by the athletic association. The board
The contest was extremely close, of control recently ruled to give the
and the decision was in doubt until band $800 yearly on condition that the
the final report came in. Roy B. regents give $1,500, but ' looks as if
Weaver, of Carroll College, represent- the board will override the condition,
ing the state of Wisconsin, took sec- according to several of its members.In
ond honors. the meantime the band will give no
Blanshard acquitted himself admir- spring concerts. Any favorable action
ably, although unfortunately he had taken will come too late in the semes-
to speak first. He delivered his ora- ter.
tion, "The Evoultion of Patriotism," "Notwithstanding the action of the
while a puffing engine and noisy regents," said Karl B. Matthews last
train was just outside the hall. (Continued from page 1.)

iCercie

ENTIRE

Reports From Penn Relays to
Given Out; Game to Start at
3:00 Sharp.

CAST PERFORMS WELL.

Be

Francais Holds Annual
Before Appreciative
Audience.

Play

Mercedes de Goenega,Elaine Shields,
Florence Middaugh.
The Summer Wind .. J. W. Bischoff
Selections by the Glee Club:.
The Two Clocks ...... J. H. Rogers
A Song of Seasons ... C. B. Hawley
granted a leave of absence from June
1 to the end of the present academic
year in order that he may go abroad.
The proposition to allow $100 for
four annual social entertainments for
the nurses in the training school was
turned down.' A sum of $150 was al-
lowed for the replenishing of the col-
lecting outfit of the museum of zoolo-
gy.
Dr. John Stokes was appointed in-
structor in anatomy to succeed Dr.
R. E. McCotter, resigned.
The regents voted that with the be-
ginning of the academic year 1915-'16
the requirements for admission to the
law department will be increased to
two years college work.
The sale of the Omaha property,
which came to the university as
through a bequest 'of Dr. Elizabeth
Bates, .14 years ago, was authorized.
The recent cyclone damaged the prop-
erty to such an extent that it was
thought best to sell rather than to re-
pair it.
Prof. A. F. Hurlburt was granted a
leave of absence for, one year without
pay. He will go to Harvard for grad-,
uate work.
The board agreed that the Hill au-
ditorium should not be used for pub-
lic purposes after the May festival un-
til it is dedicated in June.
The following commission was ap-
pointed to administer the botanical
gardens for the coming year: Presi-
dent H. B. Hutchins, dean of the phar-
macy department, Dr. A. B. Stevens,
Professors Newcombe, Roth, Tealdi,
Hus, Superintendent J. H. Marks and
Secretary "Smith.
George Shiras, of Washington, D. C.,
gave $100 for an expedition to White
Fish Point, which was accepted.
The following degrees were awarded
by the board: L.L.M., Paul Nourse,
(Continued on page 4.).

CLASS BASEBALL TO
START WITHIN EEK
May 2 is Set For Opening Game by
Coach Douglas, and Schedule
is Given Out.
MANAGERS URGED TO GET BUSY.
With the schedule made out and on-
ly the formalities and practice needed,
the interclass baseball is slated to
start Friday, May 2.
All the managers must have their
list of names in the hands of Coach
Douglas by the evening of Monday,
April 28. All the players must be cer-
tified by the dean of their department
as eligible, and have a physical exam-
ination by Dr. May, before they will
be allowed to participate in any of
the games.
The athletic authorities are anx-
ious that the various requirements be
attended to by the managers and play-
ers at once, and Coach Douglas has
been given authority to disqualify any
team failing in this regard.
Following is the schedule for the
series:
May 2.-'16 Lit. vs. '15 Lit. (1);
'15 Law vs. Pharmics (2).
May 5.-'16 Eng. vs. '15 Eng. (3);
'15 Med. vs. '16 Med. (4).
May 7.-'14 Lit. vs. '13 Lit. (5); '14

i1edie Honor Fraternity Takes
Three Members From Junior
Medic Class

in

GENERAL ABILITY REQUIRED
Three junior medics were elected
last night to Alpha Omega Alpha, hon-
or medic fraternity. The men taken
in were Joseph A. Elliot, Jr., A.B.,
ilioundville, Alabama; Quintes O. Gil-
bert, A.M., Ann Arbor; and Howard
R. Hartman, A.B., Toledo, Ohio.
Alpha Omega Alpha is a national
lionorary fraternity, with chapters at
all the best medic schools of the coun-
try, and ranks with Phi Beta Kappa
or Sigma Xi. The active chapters
may be composed of one sixth of each
graduating class, three to be elected
at the end of the junior year, and
three during the first semester of the
senior year.
Membership is based on scholarship,
moral character, and general fitness
for the medical profession. Members
are elected from eligibles approved by
faculty members of the organization.
Move Schoolmen Offices to Lansing.
In order to faciliate the work of
securing teaching positions for the
members of this year's graduating
class, the appointment committee
moved. its official headquarters to
Lansing yesterday so that the school-
men attending the meeting of the
state superintendents could examine
the records of prospective pedagogues
without coming to Ann Arbor.
Drawings for Memorial Hall Delayed
For some unknown reason the
drawings and illustrations of Orsen
Lowell, one of "Life's" artists, have
as yet failed to arrive and the exhi-
bition of his works which was sched-
uled to open Monday in the upper
lecture room of Memorial hall has
consequently been delayed.
The Dramatic club presented Ten-
nyson's "Falcon" in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall yesterday afternoon. The
roles were played by Catherine Reig-
hard, Alice Lloyd, Helen Malcomson,
and Clara Roe.

EL OMEGA ALPH A
ELECTS T HREE MEN,

Moliere's farce "Les Fourberies de
Scapin," excellently played in
the French tradition, was the
annual - offering of the Cercle
Francais at the Whitney the-
ater last evening, before a delighted
and appreciative audience. All the ac-
tors, and M. Talamon as director, de-
serve great praise for a smooth and
effective performance.
.M. Albert Hurlburt as Scapin had
about half the play to himself, and did
a brilliantly clever piece of acting.
His scenes with M.Talamon, who play-
ed Goronte with fine finish, were ir-
resistible. Misses Guilford and Shields
were charming as the two girls, and
Miss Helmecke played her one short
scene with good dramatic effect. Cyril
Quinn gave a fine impersonation of
Argante, and Robert Tannahill and
Mark Wisdom were excellent in the
roles of the two lovers. Waldo Fellows
played the comic valet in his own
unique way, and Loren Robinson was
picturesque and quite thrilling as
Carle.
Electrical Engineers Hear Lecture.
"Engineering Problems which the
Engineers of the Bell Telephone In-
terests have to Solve" was the sub-
ject of a lecture given before the elec-
trical engineers yesterday morning
by Mr. F. L. Morehouse '97E, chief
equipment engineer of the American
Telegraph and Telephone System and
Mr. F. B. Jewe of the Western Elec-
tric Company.
Elect Officers for School of Music
The graduating class of the Univer-
sity school of music elected officers'
yesterday afternoon. The following
were elected: Pres., Mark Wisdom;
Sec., Mrs. J. J. Kennedy; Treas., Mil-
dred Barchus. The invitation and
picture committees will be appointed
at the next meeting which will take
;Mace next week.

The Georgia peaches, seeking for a
comeback for Wednesday's encounter,
will perform on Ferry field again to-
day if the threatening weather ma
g'ants the privilege. But the south-
erners are not making any rash bets
as to the outcome, in as much as they
are aware of the fact that Sisler will
do the heaving against them, and after
a certain memorable inning down
south when the port side artist retired
the side by the whiff route on nine
balls they have a wholesome respect
for his wing. The visitors have taken
the measure of M. A. C. and need this.
game to make their northern trip a
success besides balancing the Michi-
gan account.
The Wolverine lineup will be a trifle
shifted owing to a near serious acci-
dent which occurred on Ferry field.
Baker and Sheehy got over ambitious
as to the capturing of a certain fly and
collided with a terrific force knocking
both men out. For a time it was fear-
ed that both were seriously injured
and they were taken to a doctor's
office. Sheehy suffered a gash on the
head that required considerable dress-
ing while Baker was badly shaken up.
While it is probable that neither will
suffer any permanent injury, it is very
unlikely that either will be able to
perform today.
As a'result Duncanson will probably
be sent to the short field and Corey
will amble in left. Both men have
performed before and the change
should not weaken the team except
perhaps for Baker's hitting, though
Duncanson has been finding them of
late. Howard's knee is still bothering
him and Pontius will work on the first
sack with the rest of the lineup the
same as Wednesday. Sisler will work
in the box and it should prove easy
for Michigan.
In an effort to direct the enthusiasm
on the field, Whitey Otis will lead the
cheering assisted by a corps of tryouts.
These tryouts are open to the student
body at large and all aspiring contor-
tionists who can draw forth cheering
must report to Otis at Ferry field at
2:15 o'clock. Reports will be received
from the Penn relays and given out
from the field as soon as received. Al-
so overflow ropes will be stretched
along the third and first base lines in
an effort to keep the crowd back and
committee men will enforce the rule.
The game will be called at 3:00
o'clock sharp though it is probable
that Penn messages will be received
before that time.
TICKETS FOR COSMOPOLITAN
CLUB BANQUET SELL RAPIDLY
Admissions for the , Cosmopolitan
club banquet Thursday night are sell-
ing rapidly. Provisions are made for
100. In addition to the speakers
which have been published there will
be a musical program including solos
by Kenneth Westerman, and violin
and piano duets by Marten Van Horn
and Mark Wisdom. The remaining
tickets can be secured from Secre-
tary M. M. Johnston, A. A. Scheerer;
T. S. Torralba, and T. Yamada.

Law vs. '13 Law (6).
May 9-'14 Eng. vs. '13
Dent. vs. J. Dent. (8).
May 10-Winners (1)
(5), (9).
May 12-Winners (2)
(6), (10).
May 13-Winners (3)
(7), (11).
May 15-Winners (4)
(8), (12).
May 16-Winners (9)
(10), (13).
May 17-Winners (12)
(14).
May 19-Winners (11)
(14), (15).
Finals--Winners (13)

GEORGE B. KIRKPATRICK.

Eng. (7); '161

Winners

vs.

vs. Winners
vs. Winners
vs. Winners
vs. Winners
vs. Homeops
vs. Winners
vs. Winners

(15).
All games will be called at 4:05
o'clock, and any team failing to ap-
pear on the diamond at the scheduled
time will be obliged to forfeit the con-
test to their opponents.
All protests must be filed with Coach
Douglas at least two days before the
first game.

New York Lecturer Who Will Speak
at Newberry Hall Tonight.

A

NEWBERRY HALL
Prof. Geo. R. Kirkpatrick
Wisconsin University
and Rand School of

id'

PROMPTLY at 8:00

THE

I

FIST

A Lecture on Anti-Militarism.
"No arraignment of war more convincing, no plea for peace more eloquent"
Admission by Course Ticket or 15c at the Door.

Special Lecturer
New York City Board of
Education

Science

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