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April 25, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

T.he

Micht an

ily

maws=

READ DAILY BY
5,000 STUDENTS.

No. 143.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 25, 1:913.

PRICE FIVE C

RD PASSES

UP GONFERENCE
RESOLUTIONS'
Regents Take No Action to Return to
Fold Because Petition is
Late in Reaching
Presidet
CHIC AO() ALUMNI APPEAL
FOR ALLIANCE WITH WEST.

Medical Building to Be
Town; Other Business
Transacted.

Torn

I TIDE WEATHER MAN
F orecast for AnnArbor-Friday,
showers and cooler.
University Observatory-Thursday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 68.4; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
79.6; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 52.4; average wind veloci-
ty, 9 miles per hour.
FRESH LAWS FEAST TOMORROW.
Members of Faculty and Class Will
Respond to Toasts.
All arrangements have been com-
pleted for the annual fresh law ban-
quet which will be held tomorrow ev-
ening at the Allenel hotel at 7:30
o'clock. Professors T. A. Bogle and J.
C. Knowlton, of the law faculty, are
listed to speak and also six members
of the class. These are W. McIntyre,
H. C. Bogle, W. J. McKenzie, J. S.
Ctawford, A. J. Voorhees and E. R.
Thurston. H. L. Nutting will present
a reading and the class quartet will
give a few selections. Tickets for the
dinner are selling for $2.00 and may
be obtained from any member of the
committee. ,
PRSN EC

68 SCIENTISTS
ARE SELECTED
BY SA XI

24 SENIOR LITS
A HE E:L E 2'T E 0TO
SLocal Chpt r tip.kes Annull iS lect:on

~'4 Lits and Engineers to Unite
ig' rAnnual TDancinig
Marty.

<iV f, on JAMBOREE WILL BE
STAGED A T A RMAORY TOGAItGH'r

Annual Elcecton is Announced
New Members Are Chosen
on Basis of Schol-
arship.
ENGINEEING DEPARTMENT

and

oI e'ber'; Purteen 0
Choseii Are len and
Are W omen*.
0 FF CERS FOR ENSUIiNO
ARE SELECTE) AT

kf Those
Ten
YEAR
MEETING

LEADS UNDERGRADIUATE LIST

Graduate Students Figure in Selec-
tion; Medics and Lits Well
Represented.

Ir, Sammel . 1rot 71ers Will Be The
'rinc lpal Speaker at Banquet
on May 8.

With a great expenditure for music,
programs and refreshments, the Jun-
ior Jamboree will be staged at the Ar-
mory tonight by junior lits and engi-
neers. Dancing will continue from
9:00 to 2:00 o'clock wits music by
Finzel's orchestra of Detroit.
To avoid confusion in serving, a se-
ries of relays has been arranged.
Flash and flood lights will be played
during many of the numbers, some of
which will be featured by orchestra
specialties.
Most of the tickets have been sold
but those remaining may be obtained
from members of the committee or at
the door forl$2.00.
Webster Society Meets Tonight
A talk on "Socialism" by Maurice
Sugar, '13L, a discussion of the honor
system by Louis Haller, '11-'14L, and
the semi-annual election of officers
will make up the program for the reg-
ular meeting of the Webster society
tonight. The meetin'g will be held in
the society rooms in the law building
at 7:45 o'clock.

UNION TO MAKE
NO ALLIANCE IN

No action was taken by the board
of regents in regard to the conference
question at its meeting last night.
The resolutions by the board in con-
trol of athletics petitioning for the re-
turn to the western fold did not come
up at this meeting owing to the ruling
of the board that all business must be
in the hands of the president ten days
before the meeting of the board. The
athletic board did not decide to put
the' question up to the regents until
last Saturday and it therefore, was
barred from action at.this meeting.
Th comm'unication from the uni-
versity senate in regard to the con-
ference was not acted upon and was
put over to the May meeting so that
both resolutions could be discussed at
the same time.
The regents were addressed by the
delegation of Chicago alumni and lis-
tened attentively to their pleas for
the return of Michigan to the confer-
ence. Their address caused consid-
erable discussion on the part of the
board but did not precipitate action
on the question.

FUND, CAMP~

In

With the election of 68 candidates,
Sigma Xi, the honorary scientific so-
ciety, exceeded last year's elections by
17. The elections, which were an-
nounced yesterday, were based on
scholarship, and the new members
were selected from faculty, graduates
and senior students.
The list of the newly elected mem-
bers follows:
Faculty Members.
Bradshaw, John William; Menefee,
Ferdinand Northrup; Smith, Arthur
Whitmore; Ware, Elmer Edwin.
C radiiate Students.
Barber, Bertram Alpha; Barker, Er-
nest Franklin; Cheyney, Ernest Wal-
dron; Colin, Leroy Melvin; Conover,
Charles Junius; Crump, Clifford Charl-
es Cook; DeCamp, Joseph Edgar; Ehl-
ers, John Henry;Corless, George Brad-
ford, as of the resident graduates
class of 1912; Foulk, Howard Vanton;
Goldsberry, John Philip; Hess, George
Wellman; MacKay, Sarah Davina;
Mellor, Lewis Leroy; Quick, Bert Ed-
win; Reeves, Cora Daisy; Richards,
Joseph Levering; Robinson, Wilber Ir-
3ng; Snedecor, George Waddel;
(Continued on page 4.)

Phi Beta Kappa yesterday afternoon
elected 24 members of the 1913 liter-
ary class to membership. This con-
stitutes about five per cent of the sen-
ior lit class and is the third largest
number ever taken in by the local
chapter.
Of those selected, 14 are men. Last
year, out of the 22 chosen, only 10
men were picked. Sororities are rep-
resented by three women and only two
of the men selected are members of
fraternities. Last year seven of the,
women belonged to sororities while
the same number of fraternity nem-
bers were chosen as this year.
Those selected are:
Ioward V. Devree, Grand Rapids;
Selden S. Dickinson, Jackson; Harold
F. Douglas, Fenton; Jay Dunne, Mag-
nolia, Ill.; Jennie G. ruerstananu.
Saginaw; Robert P. Lane, Fort Wayne,
Ind.; Winifred B. Mahon, Ann Arbor;'
John, . Mer Ann Arbor; Karl J.
Mohr, Pekin, Ill.;Ans P. Parks,
Ann Arbor; Viol, ?a.el Pell, Howell;
Edith P. Rings, Ann Arbor; Maude E.
Robertson, Harrisburg, Pa.; Carl G.
Schoefiel, Freeport, Ill.; Harold P.
, (Continued on -age 4.)

Edwin J. Kemi, a Regular Dinner
States That Joint Solicitation
With Y. it. C. A. Will
Not Be Made.
JUDGE MURPHY TALKS ON
UNiVERSITY AN1) THE STATL
Eighty Men are rresent and Respond
to Speeches With reat
Enthusiasm.
"No alliance with the Y. M. C. A.
will ever be made by the Michigan Un-
ion in its campaign for funds for a
new building," said Edward G. Kemp,
president of. that organiation, in a
speech given at the monthly member-
ship dinner at the Union last evening.
"Our fight for a new building is go-
ing to be' made alone," continued
Kemp. "The plan for a joint solicita-
tion in conjunction with the Y. M. C. A.
was decided to be inadvisable after
continued consideration, and as a re-
sult we will go our way unaccompa-
nied and unassisted."
The announcement that the Union
would not ally with the Y. Y. C. A.
was greeted with applause on the part
of the 80 men present at the dinner.
"Our problem at present," declared
Kemp, "is to find a young alumnus
with enough business ability and ex-
.perience to undertake the solicitation
of money. Such a man is not easy to
secure. He must have unusual ac-
complishments in order to approach
alumni for large subscriptions, and
men of this character are for the most
part engaged in business for them-
selves."
The principal speaker of the even-
ing was Judge Alfred J. Murphy, of
Detroit, who took as his topic: "The
Educated Man and the Public."
(Continued on page 4.)

Fhe regents raised the fees of the
ital department for Michigan stu-
its from $55 to $65 and for non-
ident students from $75 to $95,
. sum of $1,500 was appropriated
(Contnued on page 4.)
)NSTITUTIGN FOR

i

Arrangements Are Complete For Stag.
ug e Moliere's Play at
Whitney.
PICTURESQUE DETAILS FEATUR4
Specially made costumes and a spe-
cial. set of scenery from Detroit will
give "Les Fourberies de Scapin," the
annual French play tonight, a brilliant
scenic effect. The traditions of the
Comedie Francaise, where the delight-
ful farce of Moliere is a favorite, have
been carefully followed in planning
the picturesque details of the per-
formance.
In flaming red and white stripes.
the stout figure of Scapin, played by
M. Albert Hurlburt, is easily the most
striking thing on the stage, and his
pranks are irresistibly funny. Misses
Guilford, Shields, and Hlelmecke have

TEAM LEAVES. FOR
PENN RELAY GAMES
t'wolve Men go to Philadelphia to Rep-
resent Michigan in Tomor-
row's Meet.
TWO MILERS IN GOODl SHAPE,
Twelve men strong, the men who
will represent the Maize and Blue in
the Penn championship relay games
of Saturday, left at 7:30 o'clock last

iAND QUESTIONS IS NOT
CONSIDERED BY REGENTS

Student Musicians Will Appear
When Future Has Been
Provided For.
No action was taken by the
of regents at its meeting last
in regard to the band question

Again

315 ACCEPTED'
Adopts Union Boat Club
lion; to Be Submitted to I
)&rd of Directors.
CREW ULTIMATE AIM.

board
night
but it

k constitution and by-laws for the
iversity of Michigan Boat club were
epted by the committee last night,
I have been submitted to the board
directors for final adoption.
'he report of the sub-committee,'
ich was adopted by the general
nmittee, calls for a mass meeting of
studexit body next week, at which
e members will enroll and -officers
I be nominated and elected.
'he men who have been promoting
movement will speak at this meet-
explaining all the features of the
ns, which have been carefully,
'ked over by the committee. Many
he details; however, have been left
he officers.
he objects of the organization are
3e fold: first, the safeguarding of
second, the promotion of pleas-
and third, the ultimate estab-
tment of a varsity crew. Under the
>nd division it is planned to hold a
e regatta each year.
he comimttee has been in consulta-
. with municipal authorities, the
z Arbor Civic association, the Ed-
i company, and the U. of M. boat'
ry; and have received cordial
mises of support from all of them.
eorge B. Duffield, '14E, chairman
(Continued on page 4.)

parts which allow their talentssfull
scope, and Cyril Quinn and M. Tala-
mon as the two angry fathers do some
clever acting.The two amorous youths,
impersonated by Robert Tannehill and
Mark Wisdom, have some excellent
scenes, and much comedy is furnished
by Waldo Fellows as Sylvestre and
Loren Robinson as Carle.
The play will begin at 8':15, the
audience being shown their seats by
women ushers in the French style.
The sale of seats will continue today
at the Whitney box office,.at the prices
of $1.00, 75c, and 54c.
NOTED ENGINEERS TO TALK
ON ELECTRICAL PROBLEMS.

is probable that the proposition will
be given some consideration at this
morning's session.
For years the band has had a pre-
carious existence. It has turned out
for football games, concerts and other
campus events since its organization
without knowing who would pay for
the music it had used. It has never
been on a permanent footing.
Moreover, this year members of the
student council committee and the
committee from the athletic board of
control planned a system whereby the
band will be permanently established.
The athletic association has offered to
appropriate yearly $800 for the main-
tenance of the band," provided that
the board of regents gives $1500.
Members of the organization,
through Max Stanley, their leader,
have taken a definite stand and refuse
to do any more playing until their
future is provided for.
PROF. STANLE S CLASS TO
INSPECT ORGAN CONSTRUCTION

GOV. FERRIS SIG~NS BILL
FOR NE V SCIENCE BUILDING
Appropriation oi $ 7 i 0 for Struet-
nre is V4douted Upon Signature
of Goiernor0
Gov. Wocdbridge N. Ferris yester-
day morning signed the bill appropri-
ating $375,000 for a new science build-
ing for the univ ersity. This insures
the erection on the campus of one of
the most complete science buildings in
the country.
The new structure will be of similar
design to the chemistry building, one
fourth larger than it, and will. be plac-
ed between it and the law building
opposite to the Hill Auditorium.
TO REGULATE OLD TRA IIT ION S.
Senior Engineers .Discuss Campus
Customs; Plan Formal Dance.
Regulations were adopted by the
senior engineers at a class meeting
yesterday . afternoon tending to
strengthen several campus traditions
that of late have been violated, name-
ly the use of the senior benches by
other than m6mbers of the senior
class, and the carrying of canes by
others than seniors. It was decided
that no undergraduate, except seniors,
should carry canes.
The cliss voted to hold a formal
dance on Tucsday, May 6th, at Gran-
per's. It was voted that flowers would
not be worn at the dance. No senior
banquet will be given by the class
owing to the recent faculty ruling rel-
ative to the out of town affairs.

evening for Philadelphia. The party
consisted of Captain Haft, Haimbaugh,
Jansen, Brown and Lamey of the Var-
sity two mile team; Smith, Lyttle, Cat-
lett, Lifer and Core of the freshman
mile team, and Sargeant and Kohler,
both of whom will participate in their
special events, besides Trainer Far-
rell and Student Manager Denison.
Michigan's chances in wining first
place in the two mile event are ex-
ceedingly bright. Michigan has drawn
an advantageous position close to the
pole,, and with four good runners to
compete there seems no reason why'
the Maize and Blue should not be tri-
umphant in its field.
"Michigan will have about the fin-
est two mile team that ever stepped
:nto Franklin field," was the predic-
ion delivered by Trainer Farrell after
the trials had been run. Farrell was
reluctant about the time, but unoffici-
ally it is stated that Captain Haff's
:ime in the event was well under 2
quinutes, and as the other three run-
ners come in close behind him, the
average time is exceedingly good.
Sargent and Kohler also have excel-
lent chances of winning places in the
'igh jump and weight events respect-
,vely.
13 LAWS MAKE BANQUET PLANS,
Will Hold Function at Allenel Hotel
on May 3,
After much debating and discussion,
the senior law class has definitely de-
cided to hold its annual banquet at
the Allenel hotel on Saturday even-i
n, May 3.1
Prominent members of the law fac-
ulty will be asked to give addresses,
The members of the class who will
speak are, J. M. Butler, Norman Reed,i
W. M. Connely and Karl B. Matthews.,
The tickets for the dinner will sell
for $1.50 and will go on sale Monday. t
A. special committee will handle 'thet
sale of the admission cards.]

STUDENT ORATOR
GOES TO CONTEST
Paul Blanshard, '14, Leaves to Speak
for Michigan at oshen,
Indiana.
FIVE COLLEGES ARE ENTERED.
Paul Blanshard, '14, r presents
Michigan tonight in the ter-state
peace contest at Goshen, Indiana,
meeting the winners of the state con-
tests of Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, and
possibly Pennsylvania.
His oration, "The Evolution of Pa-
triotism," with which he won the state
contest at Ypsilanti last semester,
was delivered in University Hall yes-
terday morning.
"Blanshard spoke remarkably well,"
said Prof. Trueblood, just before leav-
ing with Blanshard yesterday after-
noon. "He created more interest than
any speech of a similar nature in
some time. I have great faith in his
ability."
The contest . tonight is of
more than usual interest to
Professor Trueblood, since E.
A. Hallowell, of Earlham College', who
represents Indiana, is coaihed by his
brother, Prof. Edwin P. Trueblood,
37, who is at the head of the oratory
department at the Hoosier school.
Louis Eich, '12, who represented the
university in the Northern.Oratorical
League contest at Evanston last year,
won the Illinois state contest for Knox
College,and will represent that state at
the western inter-state contest at St.
Louis, May 3.

Mr. F. L. Morehouse, '97E, formerly
professor of electrical engineering in
this university, now equipment engi-
neer of the American Telegraph and
Telephone company, will lecture this
morning at 10:00 o'clock in room 348
in the engineering building. Mr. F. B.
Jewett, assistant chief engineer of the
Western Electric company, wits com-
bine with Mr. Morehouse in presents' g
the subject "Some Engineering Prob-
lems with which the Engineers of the
Bell Telephone Interests have to deal."
While the lecture is intended pri-
marily for senior engineers, all in-
terested are invited.
Mr. Morehouse will deliver another
lecture this afternoon in Prof. A. E.
White's room, number 208 in the en-
gineering building, at 4:00 o'clock.

Prof. Albert Stanley's class in the
history of music will visit the Hill
Auditorium next Monday afternoon
in order to see the practical sidet of
organ construction. On the secondary
stage of the building, the large Co-
lumbian organ is being rapidly as-
senjbled. The swell box with the 32
foot pipes are already in position,
and the smaller pipes will be hoisted
into place the first of next week.

Union :Dance Tickets Go On Sale.
One hundred tickets for. Saturday
night's Union membership dance were
placed on sale yesterday afternoon at
5:00 o'clock. Chaperones for the dance
vill be Prof. and Mrs. C. T. Johnston
and Mr. and Mrs. A. E. White.

,., s e - Y

f "

(hitney

8'ONIGH T

Curtain
at 8:15

eatre

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