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October 17, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

$2.50

I

'he

Michigan

Daily

flAILED TO AN
ADDRESS $3.00

No. 14.

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TF URSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1912.

PRICE F

s

S BREAK
IGH WEAK

LINE

I I I

6SITY SHOWS NEED OF REAT
nMP3ROVEIENT IN LINE AS RE-
4IULT OF SCUI1t1WA E WITH RE-
SERVES YESTERDAY.
ICKFELD SHOWS UP WELL
o'son and Hughitt Star for Varsity
Wlile. Maulbetch Plays Best
for Reserve Team.
about five hundred enthusiasts sat
the Ferry field bleachers yesterday;
d shivered through an hour of
immage trying to get a line on the
sity. They did get a line, but not
particular line that sends Wol-
rive stock soaring, for the perform-
ce of the Varsity was far from spec-
ular and meritorious. In fact the
>wing caused more than shivers of
d to shake the enthusiasts, it was
rtly shivers for the result of Satur-
r's game. '
t was in the main the old trouble of
line that made the outlook doubt-
. Time after time the scrub backs
inged through for substantial gains
d just as Qoften the scrub Linemen
>ke through and messed up the Var-
y offense. In fact the line showed
like a piece of Swiss cheese, full of
les, but it lacked the strength of
t delicious morsel. If the Wolver-
s are to win from Ohio on Saturday
re must be a far better exhibition
the line than that shown yesterday.
th wings of the wall were weak and
no individual man could be singled
as lacking. It appeared more as
he whole line was loafing and going
eer things in a half hearted fashion.
rhe backfield showed to better ad-
itage and did some real work in
vancing the ball. Thomson was re-
y up to his old time line smashing
'm and played one of the best games
s fall. His open field running show-
vast improvement and judging
m yesterday's form he is going to
ise the O. S. U. aggregation a lot
trouble. Hughitt, playing at half,
ve one of the prettiest exhibitions of
tussle and it is a pity the little
low hasn't any more weight. He is
hout a doubt the most' valuable
.n on the entire squad in the matter
interference and he is sure to make
ew of the regulars move rather fast
hold their jobs.
the regular team started scrimmage
ept that Cole and MacHile played
kles, and Hugh'tt and Boyle half-
oks. Jimmy Craig was not in a suit
d Raynsford is on the hospital list
h an injured leg. Boyle did not
w up as well as was expected at
halfback job. He has a bad habit
running back on his end runs and
rhaps a bit too wide with the result
t, he often loses ground. Before
long scrimmage was over many
hstitutions had been made, Torbet,
shnell, Bleich, Collette, Wyman, Pe-
son, and Musser having a chance
show,
The Varsity went after the scrubs in
first half of the game and it was
re that things went bad. It took
Ave minutes for the first touchdown.
omson going through the line after
regulars had been repulsed by the
ubs for some time. The Varsity of-
ise seemed as powerful as it should
while the defense was rather rag-
d except on the ends, where Barton
d Pontius stopped nearly every at-
upt, The battles with the reserves
Nut on for half an hour more before
e Varsity could tally again. The
iy wa mainly in the middle of the
Id but 'finally' Thomson broke loose
d travelled forty-five yards across
e line. At this stage the Varsity
ed several forward passes but their
lure was more conspicuous than

Air success.
Tli- freshmen were then trotted on1
the field but they seemed a bit}
sier than the reserves. It took the
rsity Just twenty minutes to count
ice against them and the offense
is much better than against the
ruhs But in going against the

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Fair and
warmer.
University Observatory-Wednesday
7:00 p. m. temperature 46.1; maximum
temperature 31.1; average wind veloc-
ity last 24 hours, 5 miles.
CAPTAIN THOMSON APPOINTS
MGR. COOLIDGE'S ASSISTANTS
Captain Thomson of the VarsityI
football team has announced the ap-
pointment of his committeemen for
the 1912 season. The men whom he1
has appointed to assist Manager Cool-1
idge are: Fred Dye, '14L, Gordon C.;
Eldridge, '14, and Al Harvey, '14.
PRESIDENT NAMES7
NEWf COMITTEESx
President H. B. Hutchins yesterday1
announced his appointment of mem-
bers of the Administrative board of1
the literary department, extra hour
committee and non-athletic committee.
Following are the appointments:
Administrative board-Professors J.
S. Reeves, C. Bonner, A. L. Cross, E.
H. Kraus, Max Winkler, T. E. Rankin,J
J. L. Markley, A. G. Hall, E. C. Case,
Acting Dean J. R. Effinger, C. P. Wag-
ner and F. M. Taylor.
Non-athletic committee-Professors
A. H. Lloyd, F. N. Scott, L. A. Strauss,
A. A. Stanley, C. W. Edmunds, R. W.
Aigler, J. A. Bursley, C. J. Tilden, and
Dean Myra B. Jordan.
Extra hour committee-Professors
E. C. Case, John Bradshaw, and C. S.
Berry.
The new committeemen will hold
office during the entire year 1912-13.
VARIOUS CLASSES TO HOLD
ELECTIONS THIS WEEK END.
Many Elections are Divided or Post-
. oned Because of Excursion
to Ohio State Game. -
During-the latter part of this week,
and next, the various classes will hold
their regular elections. The junior en-
gineers will ballot from 2:30 until
5:30 Friday afternoon; and the sen-
iors in that department, from 1:00
until 6:00 of the same afternoon, in
room 311, engineering building.
The senior homeops also elect Fri-
day.
The junior laws hold their election
from 9:15 to 12:15 Saturday, and the
junior lits will hold theirs one week'
fron1 Saturday. R. G. Rodkey, candi-
date for class president, and Sophie
Koch, candidate for vice-president,
both of the junior lit class, have with-
drawn. F. M. Church has been nom-
inated by petition for treasurer of the
same class.
On account of the 0. S. U. trip Sat-
urday, the senior lit election will be
held in two sections: the first, from
4:15 to 5:15 a. m. Saturday. Members
of the class may cast their vote at ei-
ther time. Florence Swinton, who was
nominated for secretary of this class,
has withdrawn.
DEAN JORDAN TO ENTERTAIN
ALL ,IUNIOR WOMEN FRIDAY
Women of the junior class in all de-
partments of the university, are cor-
dially invited to attend the third wom-
:n's party, given by Dean Myra B.
Jordan, at Barbour gymnasium,,Fri-
day at 4:00 o'clock. The committee for

the junior play will be elected, and
oeneral plans for the submission of
manuscripts, etc., will be discussed.
After the business is conducted, there:
will be dancing until six. Ike Fischer
has charge of the music,
AC0LYTES PLAN SERIES OF
PHILOSOPHICAL LECTURES.
Acolytes, the honorary philosophical
society, met Tuesday night and elect-
ed the following men: W. W. Schroed-
er, '14, G. H. Taylor, Graduate School,
C. Hull, '13, J. G. Kuderna, and K. Ta-
nuchi. It was decided to have a series
of lectures during the year on the sub-
ject "Science versus Philosophy," by
prominent members of the faculty.
Dean V. C. Vaughan will deliver the

Of the 2,013 per ons who had regis-
tered up to yesterday morning on the 1
Michigan union membership book,
the lits claim the largest number
of any dopartment by nearly 200,
the fresh lits leading all classes on
the campus with 255 Union mem-
bers among their ranks. The en-
gineering department is second to
the lit college with 583, while the
laws and medics come a poor third
and fourth with 222 and 37 respective-
ly. The freshman engineer class has
195 Union members, beating out the
'14 lits by only one man for second.
place among classes.
There are 25 Union members among'
the pharmics, and only six in the hom-I
eopathic medical college. The, faculty1
boasts 78 men on the Union list, and
the post grads and special students
~number 107 and 11 respectively.
Inmproportion to the enrollment in
the various departments, the lits lead
the race in the number of Union mem-
bers, with the engineers next. The
showing of the law department as a

LIT DEPARTMENT LEADS IN
ONION' ENROLLMENT LISTS

whole is by far the poorest of any de-
partment on the campus, the freshman
class in that school only having 63
Union members. There are more Un-
ion members among the fresh lit class
than in the entire law department.
The number of Union members by
departments and classes is as follows:
Lits-'13, 149; '14, 194; '15, 170; '15,
255; total, 768.
Engineers-'13, 134; '14, 121; '15,
136; '16, 195; total, 586.
Laws-'13, 78; '14, 81; '15, 63; total,
222.
Pharmics--'13, 9; '14. 7; '15, 5; '16,
4; total, 25.
Medics-'13, 1; '14, 6; '15, 7; '16, 19;
total, 37.
Horteops-'13, 5; '14, 2; '15,3.
Graduates-Total, 107(including 1't
members.)
Faculty-Total, 78.
Special-Total, 11.
Michigan Union membership figures
were increased by the addition of 18
new names yesterday. The total reg-
istered mmbership to date is 2,031.

houses using boiled water, re-
vised up to date. If your board-
ing house is not in this list yet
leep on asking until the keeper
of your eating place servos you
with boiled water.
HMcCns, reen~s,Swarouts,
Ilubuat's Wur~hsChubbs,
Tuttle's, CuIttin rCate,, Prett-
man's, Linda Vista, l'enjamin's,
Walker's, The Pines, Paris Cafe,
Blrennan's,Lumbert's, Freeman's,
Merkel's, Club Lunch Roon,
Cobb's, Wolver'n, King's, Chap-
man's, Park's, McKay's, Dakin
HCuse, Ottmer's, Campus Pont
Cafe, Kidd's,
* * * * * * e, * * *

* { * *4 *
Below is the list of boardin

z

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
-
'I
*
*
,I
*
*
*

SUFFRAGISTS

GAIN

IN ANN

a

CLASS GAMES ARE
TO START TODAY'
Coach Douglas and interelass man-
ager Milligan met the nine managers
of the class football teams entered in
the class series last niht and laid be-
fore them tie rules governing the eli-
'bility contestants. Any player par-
iciiating in the vars'ty reserve game
yesterday is eliible fo any clas
::ame. All the lists o- eligible men
have been hand.d in an'd under no cir-
cumstances can a manager p ay a man
not included in the list. If any player
is used in a contest who is not eligible
ihe game will be forfeited to the oppo-
nents. All games will be divided intc
twelve minute quarters with ten mn-
utes intermission between halves. The
first struggle is between the junio:
and soph engine~rs this afternoon a'
4:05. Frank Murphy will referee and
H. Beach Carpenter will preside a,
umpire.

PROMINENT ANN ARBOR
EXPRESS OPINIONS AS
FLtEN[CE OF COLLEGE '
ON SUFFRAGE QUESTION.
OTHER COLLEGES LEA
Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti Equ
frage Clubs Hold )Ieeting
Harris Hall Today.
As a result of Jane Addan
here last week, it is probable
strong equal suffrage league m
into conception. Interest in the
dent is strong on the campus
yet no definite action has been
all energies being concentrate
the voting element, as the ame
::omes up November o.
"Michigan is at least fifty y
hind the eastern colleges, an
of the western institutions, in
to such a vital matter as eq
'rage," said Mrs. C. W. Patte
an interview last evening. "A
Mawr, Vassar, Wellesley and V
yoke, the presidents of the
and the students unite in form
ive clubs which are aiding tt
suffrage movement by awake
terest, disseminating literatu
raising funds. Wisconsin and
also have strong organization
extend their influence through
nae, all over the state. Here a
igan there has been a deplora
of interest in the question, bu
lieve by far the majority of vo

ANNUAL TO GIVE
$70 IN PRIZES

EXPECT MANY TO
GO TO. COLUMBUS

Michiganenishiin NInag rient to
ward 'Best Members of Art
and Advertising Staff.

Re-

Applicants for Excursion Flock.
Tickets and Special Train
Will Be Ruin,

for

BOOK TO BE GREATLY INCREASED I TEAM LEAVES TOMORROW A. IT.

Prizes offered by - the management
of the 1913 - Michiganensian exceedj
those ever cffered by any publication1
in tho history of the university. In an
effort to secure the best talent that canl
be produced, the management of the
year book offers $70.00 in prizes. The
first prize will be $25.00, and $10.00
for, second. First and second prizes
of the same amount are offered for ad-
vertising. All candidates for the ed-a
itorial, business, and art staffs are re-
quested to consult with Stanley New-{
hall, managing editor, and Carl G.
Schoeffel, business manager, in theI
Michiganensian office, Tuesday at 7:30r
-p. m. At this meeting particulars inI
regard to the distribution of prizes
will be announced. Those in charge
are also anxious to talk with all stu-
dents who have photographic ability.-
It is stated that this year work on
the book has progressed more rapidly,
than ever before. The next Michigan-
ensian will differ in several respects
from those of other years. The number
of pages will be increased nearly a-,
hundred. The composition will also
undergo some changes, consisting of;
alterations In the part of the book de-
voted to seniors and the introduction
of entirely new features in other parts.
Art work of high quality will be one
of the big features. Not only will,
student contributions be used but pro-
fessional artists have been engaged to'
execute numerous plates and embel-
lishmonts. The book will come out.
earlier than ever before. It is expect-
ed to appear early in May but the ex-
act date will be announced later.
LITTLE INTEREST IN RELAYS.
Few Underclassmen out for South Da-
kota Gamnc Track Event.
Sophomores and freshmen who are
interested In running are missing a
great opportunity by not reporting
for the relay tryouts, acording to
Trainer "Steve" Farrell. Farrell wants
the underclassmen out and is doing all
in his power to get them to' report._
Yesterday afternoon a number of
track men reported, but when the roll
was called it was discovered they were
mostly juniors. The seniors are com-
ing out in their full strength, accord-
ing to Captain Haff, but so far no un-
derclassmen have reported.
Inasmuch as the relays require only
two weeks of training Farrell believes
it will be to the advantage of all men,
who are interested in running to get
out for their respective teams.

Five h: ndred Michigan ssudentl
journeyed to Columbus to witness the7
Michigan-Ohio State football ame of
1940. From present indications it ap-
pears that fully that number will com-l
pose Michigan's rooting section at this!
year's battle.
At the office of the Athletic associa-
tion enough. Michigan, men have sig-
nified their intentions of taking the
trip to Columbus to insure that thea
Michigan rooters' special will leave
Saturday morning as scheduled. A
delay in the securing of the railroad
tickets made it impossible for the as-
sociation to issue the combined trans-
portation and pasteboards and admis-
sion cards for the game, but there will
be ample opportunity for all men who
wish to make the trip to secure their
tickets before Saturday morning.
The fact that 0. S. U. has such a,
speedy team indicates that the Mich-
igan rooting contingent will be fu'ly
up to the standard set two years ago.
Michigan students look to see a good
game at Columbus and for that reas-
son all who can possibly attend wil-l
do so. .
The Michigan team will leave to-
morrow at 7:20 a..m., arriving at Co-
lumbus shortly after noon and giving
the men enough time for a short work-
out to get' the kinks out of their mus-
cles. Returning the team will leave
Columbus Sunday.
Coach Yost has not announced the:
list of men who will make the trir
with the Varsity. When questioned
yesterday as to whom he would take,
he remarked that "he guessed he
would take a shot gun," but further
than that would give no intimation as
to the -Michigan lineup.
Michigan Daily readers will be giv-
en the full account of the Michiaan-
0. S. U. game. Karl B. Matthews and
G. C. Eldredge of the sport staff will
look after the game in the interests of
The Daily.
FRESH ENGINEERS LEARN THE
BENEFIT OF CULTURAL STUDY.
Dean M. E. Cooley, of the engineer-
ing department, in his weekly talk at
the freshman assembly yesterday
showed the first year men why they
were required to take more or less
cultural studies at first, instead of
starting in at once with technical
work. "The engineering prob'ems
of the future will have to do with men
and the affairs of civilization, whereas
the old-time engineer had to do more
with the opening up of new countiries.
The cultural studies serve as a foun-
dation for the other vocational work.

Judging from the pep shown yester f
day by the 150 or more huskies trying
fcr positions on their respective teams.
herw will be many hard battles b-fo- (

A.

the championship is decided. The
squads are heavier than last year anf
if the strict eligibility rules do no
thin out the ranks the type of foot-
ball displayed in the series will be
much better than in previous seascn
CAMPUS liKES "WHAT'S WH AT."
Prominent Men Anmong Faculty auC
Student. Approve of New Book.
"What's What' at Michigan" is s
popular little book if the sale up tc
date and the expressions of approva'
by promincnt men about school arc
any criterion. The sale has been larg-
er than was expected and the co ment
has been very favorable.
Dr. James B. Angell says that it has
been carefully prepared and contaim
much information of interest to stu-
dents, especially newcomers and those
interested in the history of athletsics
P. G. Bartelme, director of outdoor
athletics, says the records are taker
from the record book of the Athletic
association and are correct. Accord
in; to Homer Heath, manager of the
Union, the book is both accurate an
complete. W. B. Shaw, editor o' th
Alumnus, speaks favorably of it f on
the view point of the Alumni, and Dean
Vaughan, of the Medical deyartmcn
also says it should be of special inter-
ost to them.
The book has been so well received
by the Alumni who have already b"er.
approached that the publishers are
planning to send circulars to the,
Alumni concerning it.

at college, they should at least
themselves interested and info
upon a matter of such vital i
tance."
It is for thepurpose of arousi
terest in the movement, that
Equal Suffrage Clubs of Ann
and Ypsilanti are holding their
vention today in Harris hall. Al
versity men and women are cor
'nvited. Miss Maude Younger
noted suffrage worker of Calif
will deliver an address at 1:30
Dr. V. C. Vaughan will also g
,hort talk. Literature upon the
iect may be obtained by calling
office of Dr. F. Waldron, over
ry's drug store.
QVERWORK CAUSES ILLNESS
OF PROFESSOR REIGNf
Head of Zoological Laboratory
Museum Confined at Battle
Creek Sanitarium.
Profemsor Jacob E. Reighard,
bio'oy y department, who has bee:
fined at -the Battle Creek sanit
or the past week is reported in
'n2, and it is hoped that he w
able to resume his work with
nonth.
Overwork was the, direct cai
1he professor's illness. For th
four years he has been director
summer biological camp, as w
ccul.ying the position as direc
the zoological'laboratory and mi
The work entailed by these pos
and the time and labor that Prof.
hard gave to problems of re4
work tended to overburden his
,!al capacity. The doctors have
ed a complete rest, but it is ex
'hat the professor will again be
duties at least 'y the end of N8
ber.
During his absence, the work
,n_ cared for 1 v Assistant Pro
C.- C. Glaser.
lhte of grad's Marriage Corr
In correction of the story ii
Michigan Daily yesterday, the
riage of Roy Baribeau, '14M, an
Katherine Kent occurred on N
her 13, 1911, intead of this
The ceremony was performed b3

LA

FRESHU1EN NUMBER

161

First Year eg traion is 100 Les.
Than Last Year.0-
One hundred and sixty-one freshmen
have enrolled ro far in the law de
partment. This is about one hundre(
less than were enrolled at this time
last year, the falling off in numbers
being attributed to the raised stand-
ard of entrance requirements, which
now require a year's work in the lit-
erary department for entrance.
"Although the falling off is marked,
a much greater decrease was expected
and predicted," said Professor Edwin
C. Goddard, secretary of the depart-
ment yesterday. 'Many who were re-
fused admission because they did not
have the year's college work, went
over to the lit department here, and so
our loss is that department's gain."

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