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April 20, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-20

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VA

MOR-NI-Nfk PAPER IN
ANN AIRBOR

The

Mi higan

Daily

READ DAILY BY
I 5,000 STUDENTS.

a

o. 139.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 20, 1913.

PRICE FIVE Cl

I . I

TEST IN

SEVENTH WINS
FROMRESERV-E
Clevelanders Blow-up After Being on
Long End of Score for Five In-
nings and Lose Game by
11 to 3 Count.
QUAINTANCE TIGHTENS UP,
AFTER SET BACK IN THIRD.
Sisler and Webber Crack Out First
Home Runs of Season on
Ferry Field.
One inning of the kind of baseball

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Sunday,
fair, with the white stuff in the ther-
mometer going up; the air will move
in variable directions with moderate
swiftness.
University Observatory - Saturday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 41.3; maximum
temperature, 24 hours preceding, 59.9;
minimum temperature, 24 hours pre-
ceding, 30.3; average wind velocity 13
miles per hour.
PROF. REEVES WILL ADDRESS
!OPH LITS TOMORROW NIGHT.,
Prof. J. S. Reeves will be the prin-
cipal speaker at the soph lit smoker
at the Union tomorrow night at 7:00
o'clock. Several members of the class
as well as Edward Lazear, '13E will
be called upon by Malcolm McCormick;
who will act as toastmaster. Musical
numbers will also be given.

EVERYMAN IS
RECEIVED WITH.
ENTHUS IAS M
Those Who Went to University 1hll
Last Night Wepe Impressed
by a Performance of
Rare Beauty.
EDITH WYNNE MATTHISON IS
WELL FITTED FOR HE PART
Proceeds Will Be Devoted to IDraniat-
ie Library of the
University.
It was a play and a performance of
rare beauty and impressiveness that
was witnessed by the few hundred who
saw "Everyman" given in Un.versity
Hall last night by the Ben Greet play-
ers. The stage, the costumes, and the
pageantry of the fine old morality
were beautiful to look at, and full of

PUT CONFERENCE
RESOLUTIONS
UPTOREGENTS
Board in Control of Athletics Decides
lo Put Decision For Return to
Mig Ne up to University
Fathers.

$ ELI' NEEDED.
-o-

*

WILL

Every student who can is urg-
ed to turn out today and help ina
the search for thf missing body
of Miss Rlysdorp. Canoes will be
furnished as long as the supply
lasts, and the owners of private
craft are urged to lend their
boats for the work.
Men with boots are needed to
help in the exploration of the
bottoi, and students will be giv-
en the preference. All who in-
tend to use canoes should bring
short boles, but lines and hooks
will be supplied by the author-
ities.
Those joining in the search
should be at the Whitmore street
bridge as near 7:00 o'clock as
possible, so that the work can be
commenced as soon as the river
goes down.*,
* * * ** * * * *

*'
t *x '
*
*
*:
*
*
*
R
:;
*

PROBABLY DISCUSS IT
AT THURSDAY'S MEETING.

Thre Seems to Be Little Fear
Action Will Not Be Upheld
By Regents.

That

approved by the rabid fans proved suf-
ficent to cook Western Reserve's goose
yesterday afternoon on the Ferry field
diamond. Batting all the way around
in the seventh, Michigan broke. up the
ball game, and if there was any mo-
mentary doubt of the fact, it was dis-
pelled when the Clevelanders added to
the hubbub by a complete blow-up.
Michigan won the game right in the
seventh, The final reckoning showed
the score to be 11 to 3.
The game showed all the ear-marks
of a tight contest during the first in-
ning. After the second round, how-
ever, it looked like an uphill fight for
the Wolverines, and plenty of fight for
Pitcher-Captain Barnes was "going
good." Then in the sixth Michigan tied
the count, and in the seventh, "the
stuff was off."
Reserve Scores in Second.
Western Reserve had her one and
only scoring session in the second pe-
riod. Singles by Kihorany, McIntosh,
Kalish and Barnes, coupled with an
error by Baker, served to give the vis-
itors their three tallies, Quaintance
appeared to disadvantage in this round
as it was only by a lucky double play
with McQueen, Rogers and Baker par.
ticipating, that the miniature batting
orgy was stopped.
In justice to Quaintance, however,
it must be noted that he did not pitch
bad ball in the succeeding innings he
occupied the hurling hill. Several
fielding slips occurred to add to the
disadvantage under which Quaintance
worked, but the slips seemed to be due
to the new combination Coach Rickey.
was obliged to send onto the field.
When Sisler came to bat in the see-
ond frame, he did his little best to
start something. He simply cracked
the ball over toward South Ferry field
and was rounding third before the Re-
serve left fielder had overhauled the
sphere in its mad flight. Sisler, how-
ever was alone in his endeavor in that
(Continued on page 2.)
KEEP UP YOUR
STUDIES Y'KNOW
"The possibilities for this year's
football squad, y' know, are the best7
in six year, and it is up to you fellows
to make these possibilities realities,"
said Coach Fielding H. Yost to more
than 50 football-candidates who met in
Waterman gym last evening.1
It was the last opportunity Coach
Yost had of meeting the men before
fall practice, and he took advantage
of the occasion to impress on the squad
the necessity of keeping up in theirI
studies and remaining in good physic-
'al condition. Spring practice will con-
tinue- for a 'week or two under the
direction of Coach Douglas and Capt.i
"Bubbles" Paterson, and all candi-1
dates are urged to come out daily. I
Yost left last night for Nashville, on3
private busienss, and will not return<
until next fall.

The resolutions governing Michi-
gan's return to the western conference
will be passed upon by the board of
regents probably at Thursday night's
meeting. At a meeting of the board in
control of athletics held last evening
at the athletic office, it was decided to
put the resolutions up to the regents.
This will probably be the second

HOLD TRYOUTS FOR
PENN RELAY TEAM
Capt. Haff, Jansen, Craig and Baer
Finish in Front in Yesterday's
Trials.
WILL CHOOSE FRES IMAN FOUIL
Captain Haff, Jansen, Craig and Baer
appear from yesterday's trials to be
the men who will represent Michigan
as a Maize and Blue quartet in the
Penn relay games of April 26. The
men finished in. the order named yes-
terday afternoon, and though the final
announcement that they would make
up the relay team was not issued by
Trainer Farrell, it is believed that
these boys will be the ones to journey
to Philadelphia.
Captain Haff easily led the way
home in the quarter and was never
headed in his sprint around the quar-
ter mile track. A feature, however,
was the excellent showing of Jansen
who came in second in the event. Craig
was third, and Baer had trouble taking
fourth place. No official time was giv-
en out by Trainer Farrell, and no un-
official time was kept. The race was
run off in excellent time, however, ac-
cording to the belief of those who
witnessed it.
The freshmen four will be compos-
ed of C. B. Smith, Ufer, Gore and Klof-
fer, if Trainer Farrell definitely decid-
es to send the youngsters to Penn.
Trainer Farrell will give them another
tryout next week, and if good time is
made they will make the Penn trip.
UNION TO HEAR NOTED LAWYER.
Judge Murphy Will Address Next
Membership Dinner.
Alfred J. Murphy, who has just re-
cently been elected to the supreme
court of Michigan will be the principal
speaker at the next Union membership
inner which will be held on Thursday
evening. Mr. Murphy, whose home is
in Detroit, is a former circuit judge
and is considered one of the best law-
yers in the state. .There are several
other speakers, and some musical
numbers on the program, which will
be announced in a few days. Tickets
are now on sale, and may be obtained
either at the Union desk or from any
member of the dinner committee.
Poems For Field Prize Due Tomorrow.
All poems for the field prize of $100
must be in the hands of Prof. F. N.
Scott of the rhetoric department to-
morrow. Entries may be left at West
hall or mailed, but must be received
within the time limit set by the judges.
A contestant may hand in any number
of poems. The decision of the judges
will be announced May 1.

E

the rich grace of the middle ages. Andstep relative to Michigan's return to
the noble gnes of the pdlae gveAnd the western body. If the plans of
the noble lines of the play were given Michigan meet the approval of the con-,
with dignity and expressiveness by a ference, there seems but little question
corps of fine-voiced and exeptionally that Michigan will once more be a
able actors. member of the "Big" Nine~as those who
Edith Wynne Matthison finds in "Ev- favor the return of the conference
Ens seem to have little fear of the reso-

eryman" a part which is peculiarly fit-
ted to display her art at its best. Her
voice in its mere tone is a thing of
beauty, and she uses it as only the few
great ones can, making it express the
subtlest change of mood or'feeling. She
makes the abstract Everyman poig-
nantly appealing and alive. Every-
thing she does is as far removed as
possible from the conventional or the-
atrical. Her conception and acting
of the part are dee), true, and sincere,
and they have, above all, beauty.
Admirable support was given Miss
Matthison by the other members of
the company. Notable were Elizabeth
Patterson as Dyscrecyon, Winifred
Fraser and Alsy Rees as Goode Dedes.
and Knolege, George Vivian as Goodes,
(Continued on page 4.)
MICHIGAN FENCERS TAKE
CHAMPIONSHIP OF STATE
The state championship in indoor
duelling was won by Michigan in a
meet with the Detroit Y. M. C. A. fenc-
ing team in Waterman gymnasium
last night. Michigan won both the
foil and duelling-sword matches, the
scores heing 4-0 and 4-2 respectively.
In the foil match Reighard and Ruth-
strom made up the Michigan team
against McCormick and D'Orlow of De-
troit. The latter were totally outclass-
ed and failed to score a thrust. The
Detroit team of two men met Matteson,
Reighard and Ruthstrom with the du-
elling swords in an exciting matcha
but Michigan was again victorious.
A challenge has been accepted by
tlM Detroit Y. M. C. A. to an outdoor ;
match with duelling swords, to be held
here sometime in May.
Prof. feader Returns to His Classes.
Professor Clarence L. Meader, of the
Latin department, will meet his classes
again tomorrow. The condition of his.
daughter Alice, who has been ill with
scplet fever, had sufficiently improved
to raise the quarantine last night.

lutions being held up by the regents.
A full board was not present at last
evening's meeting and the remainder
of the business was of routine nature.
OFFICERS FOR SPRING TERM
ELECTED BY JEFFERSONIANS
The Jeffersonian debating society
last night elected the following officers
for the spring term: president, E. F.
Botkin; vice-president, A. H. Parkes;
treasurer, R. P. Whitehead; secretary,
E. E. Storkan; critic, B. J. Jonkman,
and sergeant-at-arms, E. N. Dodds.
The annual presentation of diplomas
of merit to members will take place
at the last society smoker of the year,
which is to be held at the Michigan
Union, Friday, May 1.
WILL CANVASS STUDENTS
FOR SUPPORT OF BUSRAH
With plans completed for a cam-
paign for funds that will reach every
student in the university, the Univer-
sity Y. M. C. A. expects this coming
week to put Michigan in a class with
Harvard and Yale in regard to foreign
missionary efforts. People who are
watching missions declare that Bus-
rah, Arabia, at the head of the Persian
Gulf,, where the Students' Christian
Association of the University of Mich-
igan has established a mission, is one
of the most promising fields ever open-
ed- up.
Dr. Arthur K. Bennett, '04M,
Mrs. Bennett, '07M, Charles F. Shaw,
'11E, and Mrs. Shaw, '11L, Dr. H. G.
Van Vlack, '10M, and Mrs. Van Vlack,
and Philip C. Haynes, '11E, are carry-
in on the work at Busrah. Miss Min-
nie Holzhauser, '13, leaves May 24 to
join them.
Recently Shaw wrote, "The hope of
Arabia rests with the rising genera-
tion. If we can train a fe i' these
boys to be good and useful citizens, I
shall consider that we have accom-
plished something worth while."

SCEAI OBSERVES
55TH ANNIVERSARY
Prominent Men Scheduled to Address
Gathering in University Hall
Tonight.
CANADIAN EDITOR WILL SPEAK.
Dr. James A. Macdonald, editor of
the Toronto Globe, will speak on
"American Universities and the World
Situation" at the meeting of the Stu-
dents' Christian association in Univer-
sity Hall tonight at 8:00 o'clock.
This meeting, together with one held
in Newberry hall this afternoon, is the
ocesion of the celebration of the 55th
annt ersary of the founding of the as-
sociation. The evening meeting will
begin with an address by Dr. James B.
Angell, who, will outline the aims of
the founders. Dr. Macdonald, as the
principal speaker,, will be :itreduced
by President Harry B. Hutchins.
Dr. Macdonald received his educa-
tion at the Universities of Toronto and
Edinburgh. Since 1902, he has been
editor of the Toronto Globe, the lead-
ing newspaper and party organ for the
Liberals of Canada. He is one of Can-
ada's greatest orators, of whom Will-
iam Jennings Bryan says, "Dr. Mac-
donald stands in Canada as Gladstone
for so many years stood in Britain,
the representative of Christianity ap-
plied to government."
MUSICAL PROGRAM TO BE
GIVEN AT UNION TODAY.
There will be a program of musical
numbers at the regular Sunday after-
noon "get-together" at the Union this
afternoon beginning at 3:00 o'clock.
George P. Bailey, '16, will render a
piano solo, Homer R. Williams, '15L,
will sing, S. L. Adelsdorf, '14L,, and
W. H. Altman, '14E, will play the clar-
inet and piano together, and Warren
Breidenbach, '15, will give a violin
solo. .No more speakers will appear
on the program this year but a musical
program will be arranged each week.
Y. W. C. A. Official to Speak Here.
Miss Lucy Pierson, field secretary of
the national board of directors of the
Y. W. C. A. will speak at the regular
weekly meeting of the Y. W. C. A. in,
Newberry hall at 5:00 o'clock Tuesday
afternoon. She will talk on her work
in the large cities.
Prescott Club Elects Aninual Officers,.
At a recent election of officers of the
Prescott club M. J. Seely was elected
president, E. C. Rice, '14P, vice-presi-
dent, H. A. Osborne, '14P, secretary, E.
W. Crysler, '16P, treasurer, and S. S.
Scott, '14P, reporter.

MAKE GENERAL
SEARCH FOR
BODY TODAY
University luthorities and All Canoe
Owners Will Co-operate in Hunt
For Missing Corpse of Miss
Ella Rysdorp.
WATER WILL BE SHUT OFF
AT BARTON DAM ALL DAY
Students With Rubber Boats Are Need-
ed to Thoroughly Explore
Bottom of River.
With the university authorities fur-
nishing all the shovels and hoes at
its command, canoes donated for the
use of the searchers, and the water
shut off from early this morning until
late in the afternoon, a general hunt
for the missi ag body of Miss Ella Rys-
dorp will be conducted today. Every
student owning rubber' boots will be
given the opportunity to thoroughly
explore the bottom of the river, while
canoes will be furnished free to the
searchers as long as the supply lasts.
The university motor truck will con-
vey the implemen'.s to the Whitmore
street bridge at 7:00 o'clock and every
student who can, is urged by the a'u-
thorities to report there at that time
so that the hunt can be started im-
mediately. The gates of the big Barton
dam will be closed at 6:30 o'clock, and
the turbines will be shut off half an
hour later. This will make the river
'shallower than it has been at any time
since the accident occurred, and will
enable the bottom to be worked from
the Barton dan to the Cornwell site.
From there to the Argo dam the hunt
will be carried on by means of pike
poles and lines from the canoes.
.There is als, a chance that a diver
may be called -ipon to explore the deep
holes around the Cornwell site. The
father of the dead girl has been in
communication with a diver from
Grand Haven, who is ready to come
at a moment's notice. Mr. Rysdorp *
has guaranteed the expenses necessary
to bring the man here, and the univer-
sity authorities ha e been in consul-
tation over the matter., and it is prob-
able that they will stand the cost,
should it be necessary to have him
explore the deep holes at the old dam.
All the students turning out for
work in the canoes are requested to
bring short poles with them. Lines
and hooks will b'e furnished at the
scene of th~ search. Before the work
begins, short 'talks Aill be given by
(Continued on page 4.)
INSTALL GRADUATE
FRATERNITY HERE
With 15 Ctudeuts of the graduate
school ele ted as charter members,
Gamma Alpha, a graduate scientific
fraternity has been installed here. It
is a national organization, whose aim
is to promote the sociality, of all the

E'rcz b*tcrtanChurch
12:10-Today for University Men.
. Underground Rome9-PRO . F. W KELSEY.
First of three lectures.

active workers =ngaged in scientific
asearch work.
The initiation took place at the Un-
ion Friday, after which a banquet was
held at Mack's tea room. Ten faculty
members were present among whom
Profs. Ermine C. Case of the geology
department, Frederick C. Newcombe of
the botany department, and Dean Karl
E. Guthe Li the graduate department,
gave brief talks on the necessity of the
organization.
Plans for the erection of a club
house were formulated at the banquet,
and it is expected that the edifice will
be constructed next year.

E--

TONIGHT
Union Series

J.AO.ROTROGdonld
EDITOR OF TORONTO GLOBE

Annual
Students' Christian
Association
meeting

P. M.

I

University

Hall

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