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April 19, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-19

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ORKING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

The

Michigan

Dail

READ DAILY BY
5,0060 STUDENTS.

* - I

F

, .

'OLI TfIT, TiIT [T'G, IY TT i 1 T C

c,

No. 138.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 1913.

PRC IV ET

ORALITY

E WILL BE
TEN TONIGHT

1Everyman,' Under Direction of Ben
Greet, Will "Be Produced
in University Hall
This Evening.
LEADING PART TO BE PLAYED
BY EDITH WYNNE MATTHISON
Cloister of Old Spanish Cathedral
Will Be Setting of
Production.
Direct from the Children's Theater
n New York, the Liebler company's
pecial production of the fine old .nor-
lity "Everyman" will be given to-
night in University Hall. With a
gret artistic success and the praise
>f all the New York critics to herald
t, the production is sure to be equal-
y successful here.
"Everyman" will be acted by, the
nembers of the Ben Greet company
nder the personal direction of Mr.
Greet. This insures that it will be
iven with all the charm o atmos-
>here,the "tone" for which Mr. Greet's
roductions are famous. Edith Wynne
datthison, who created the part of
'Everyman" when the play was first
rought to America, is again playing
he part. Her admirable art is seen
o advantage in the poetic old play,
and one critic -calls her reading of the
ines a "triumph of elocution."
The stage will be set to represent
he cloister yard of Salamanca cathe-'
Iral in Spain, where the early passion
>lays were performed in the 15th an
.6th centuries by the religious orders.
[here will be choral and instrumental
nusic from the middle ages, and re-
igious processionals. The play runs
or only an hour and forty minutes,
nd is given without intermission. ,
There has been a large sale of seats
or the play, but excellent ones are
till to be had in all parts of the
ouse. The sale will continue at
Vahr's book store today from 11:00
o 12:00, and from 4:00 until 6:00
'clock.
FOOTBALL MEN TO
EAR YOST TONIGHT
Candidates for the 1913 Varsity foot-
all team are asked to meet Coach
Yost in the trophy room of Waterman
;ymnasium this evening to talk over
matters concerning the eleven for
next fall. The coach leaves tonight
or his home at Nashville, Tenn., and
wants to get a chance to meet all the
nen out for the.team.
This week's outdoor practice for
he football men has been satisfac-
ory; but on account of many of the
nen having late classes it has been
mpossible for all of them to report
o the coach at one time. While there
has been a fair sized group of aspir-
ants practicing each afternoon, the
personnel of the assemblage has
been changed deach day. As Yost
wants to get the men all together, he
aas deemed it wise to call the meet-
lng before he departs.
deemed it wise to call the meeting
befre he departs.
It is probable that besides the talk
Coach Yost will give the men, Assist-
ant Coach Douglas, Director Bartel-
me and Captain Paterson will have
something to say to the men.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Saturday,
fair and cooler.
University Observatory - Fridayw
7:00 P. M., maximum terlperature 24
hours preceding, 74.2; minimum tem-
perature 24 hours preceding, 48.0;
average wind velocity, 12.0.
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS HOLD
FESTIVITIES HERE IN JUNE'
Knights of Columbus of the State
of Michigan will gather in Ann Arbor
June 17 and 18 for their annual state
convention. Considerable influence
was brqught to bear in securing the
convention for Ann Arbor on account
of the cosmopolitan character of the
local chapter. More than one-half
the Catholic students on the campus
are members of the Knights of Co-
lumbus, and since most of these be-
long to widely scattered chapters it
was thought that great publicity
could be given to the order by bring-
ing the festivities to Ann Arbor.
NEAVY OFFER
IS EXPLAINED.

CHANGE OF LINE-UP
TO BE SEEN TODAY
McQueen at First, Hughitt at Short,
With Howard in Outfield is
.Plan of Coach.

LAVANS OUT WITH SPIKED HAND I PLANS ARE PARTLY ARRANGED.

OPERA MAY SHOW
IN CHICAGO MAY ID
Both Matinee and Evening Perform-
ances of "Contrarie Mary"
Will Be Given.

BY

t I .

OFFICR

Capt. C. C. Marsh Gives Details
Summer Trip For Students,
and Tells of Plans for
The Work.

of

TWO YEARS CREDIT REQUIRED
OF THOSE MAKING THE TRIP.
Outfit Will Cost $22 and Cost of Meals
Will Be 40 Cents
Per Day.
Capt. C., C. Marsh, U. S. N., in charge
of the training of college men on
board battleships, visited Ann Arbor,
April 6, and at a meeting of faculty
men explained the proposition, an-
swering several of the various ques-
tions that have been pouring into
Dean Cooley's office.
The following points were made
clear: Any student in the university
who has completed two years of col-
lege work is eligible to go irrespect-
ive of department.
Secondly, the work on board ship
will be made to dovetail with the col-
lege work of the student as far as is
possible, and if feasible, a faculty man
will be sent to act with the ship offi-
cers, to see that the men get work that
fits in with their college studies.
Thirdly, the cost for outfit will
amount to $22, and the cost. of the
mess will be 40 cents a day, the stu-
dents messing together.
In speaking of the work, the Navy
department in its leaflet stating the
proposition says, "It must be under-
stood that this is no yachting trip nor
summer excursion. It will involve
hard work and roughing it, without
regard to hours ,of the day or night;
for such is the custom on board ship.
It is believed that the result to the in-
dividual and to the country will more
than compensate for the work done
and personal expense incurred."
All students who expect to make the
cruise are requested to notify Dean
M. E. Cooley at once of their inten-,
tions. Pamphlets explaining the
cruise may be obtained at the dean's
office.
Many Tickets Sold For Union Dance,.
Over half the tickets for the Union
membership dance tonight have been
sold, and inasmuch as this is the first
party since vacation, it is thought
that the rest will go today,

Michigan will present a changed
battle front when the Varsity faces
the Western Reserve baseball nine at
Ferry field this afternoon.' Though
Coach Rickey usually reserves his
lineup till just before the team is sent
on the field, it has been intimated that
there will be a considerable change
from the combination that faced Al-
ma on Wednesday afternoon.
It is probble that Lavans will be
out of the game Saturday on account
of a spike wound in the hand sus-
tained in the Alma game. Hughitt
will do the duty in the shortfield if the
veteran is forced to remain out of
the contest. Another change that will
affect the infield will be the playing
of McQueen at first base instead of
Howard or Pontius.
In the outfield it is expected that
Howard, Sisler and Captain Bell will+
do the honors with Webber perhaps
getting a chance to show. Saier and
Cory played in left and right gardens
in the Alma game but Coach Rickey
has decided to try another combina-
tion.
The Western Reserve lineup will be
a strong one, and a fast ball game is
expected when the two teams clash.
SALE OF TOQUES AND CAPS
NOT TO BE ORGANIZED YET
Friction With Merchants Precludes
All Possibility of Organization of
Plan This Fall.
An idea existing in certain quar-
ters that the proposed plan regulat-
ing the sale of freshman caps and
class toques was intended to be put in
operation this fall, is a mistaken one.
,According to those interested in the
matter, it is not believed that the ar-
rangements could be marked out be-
fore the fall of 1914, at the earliest.
The plan is so radically different
from anything now undertaken by the
student body, that considerable time
would be required to secure its adop-
tion, in the opinion of its originators.
There are other important reasons,
besides that of organization, which
would preclude the possibility of tak-
ing over the toque sale by any cam-
pus body at once. The move would
have to be supported and agreed to by
all the merchants or there would be
friction, or the merchants, who have
already ordered their supply of toq-
ues, would find themselves with a
heavy burden on their hands.
BUILDS SPUR TO AUDITORIUM
D. U. R. Plans To Accommodate
Guests at May Festival
A spur will be put on the lawn ex-
extension of the campus in front of
the -new Hill Auditorium to tae care
of the crowd of the May festival.
This will be left permanently, and
used whenever there is a big event
in the auditorium.
This work has been accomplished
through the efforts of the transporta-
tion committee of the Ann Arbor civ-
ic association, of which Prof. Henry
R. Riggs, of the civil engineering de-
partment, is chairman. He and Prof.
George W. Patterson, of the electri-
cal engineering department took the
matter to the D. U. R., and called
upon the general manager in Detroit
to insure its completion.

May 10 probably will be chosen as
the date of the presentation of the
Union opera in Chicago. Both mat-
inee and evening performances will be
given, and Chairman Philip K. Fletch-
er will go to Detroit today to get data
in regard to rates and facilities.
Negotiations were started yesterday
to formulate plans for the Chicago
trip. Chairman Fletcher has written
to the Chicago Alumni association,
which has the trip in charge, in re-
gard to the date and to the arrange-
ments that will have to be made from
this end.
The committeemen to be taken will
include the general chairman, his
three assistants, the costume mana-
ger and two assistants and the prop-
erty man and two assistants. The en-
tire cast With the exception of about
sixteen chorus men will make the trip.
It is thought that scholarship may
have to be taken into consideration
in choosing the men who will go. The
definite announcement of the person-
nel of the trip will be made 'public
soon after the reply from Chicago is
received.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB ELECTS
NEW ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD.
Several New Offices and Many Impor-
tant Committees Were Filled at
Meeting Last Night.
The administrative board of the
Corda-Fratres Cosmopolitan club was
organized last evening at a meeting
in McMillan hall and Prof. J. A. C.
Hildner, of the German department,
and Fred B. Foulk, '13-'15L, were
elected treasurer and recording secre-
tary of the board respectively.
The general secretaryship, an office
recently created by the revised con-
stitution, will be filled for the ensuing
year by William W. Welsh, '12, secre-
tary of the Ann Arbor Civic associa-
tion.
The club house propaganda will be
pushed forward by Mr. A. E. Jennings,
'89, of Detroit. Prosecutor George J.
Burge, '07L, of this city, will draft a
set of by-laws for the administrative
board.
Various standing committees were.
appointed by President John Bonilla.
A finance committee was chosen with
William M. Johnston, '15, as chair-
man. Entertainment affairs will be
supervised by K. Tonouchi, '13, and
James D'evlin, '13, and A. A. Sheeren,
'15, will head the committees on pub-
licity and membership respectively.
Plans for the international banquet
to be held at the Union next Friday
were discussed, and it was decided
that the committee on entertainments
will be in charge of the affair, and
speakers of repute will be procured.

DEVELOP IN~
RIVER HUNT
High Water and Swifiness of Current
Make Thorough Exploration
Impossible During
the Day.
CONTINUE AT NIGHT WITH
MAMMOTH ELECTRIC LIGHT

JEFFERSONIANS ARE VICTiOBtS.
Victory Gives Right to Meet Edelphl
in Final Contest.
Defeating the Websters by a two to
one decision, Jeffersonian soclety won
the second preliminary cup debate on
the question "Resolved that the Pres-
idential term be extended to six years,
provided that no president be eligible
for reelection."
G H. Beninghoff, A. J. Hart, and E.
V. Main, all '14L, upheld Webster so-
ciety, while W. J..Laidlau, E. E. Stor-
kan,, and C. Goldman, all '14L, were
the Jeffersonian contestants. Prof.
J. B. Waite, Mr. R. K. Immel, and Dr.
Fuller were the judges.
Jeffersonians willsmeet the Adelphi
team, winner of last night's prelimi-
nary, for final debate on the same
question May 9.
Enjoys First Vacation in 38 Years.
"Mike" Condon, firs t dispensing
clerk of the chemistry department of
the university for nearly half a cen-
tury, has just returned from his first
vacation in 33years. He went to
Rochester, N. Y. as the guest of .
Hungerford Smith, '77 pharmic.
NO RESULTS

IMPROVEMENT

OF CAMPUS TO
BE COMMENCED
25,000 to Be Expended on Grading
of Grounds and Plant-
ing of Shrub-
bery.
WIIi ON tEW POWdl'iER HOUtSE
IS FRO RE 551W RAPIDLY.
The Excavation For the Tunnel Con-
necting With Old Power House
is Well ider 'Way.
Work on the improvement of the
campus will be started immediately
after Commencement. An expendi-
ture of $2,500 will be made for the
grading of the grounds and the plant-
ing of the shrubbery along lines fol-
lowed in city park systems.
At present, traces of the newly in-
stalled fire system are being removed,
and the campus is being cleaned up
generally. "Students can assist in
this work," said Supt. James H. Marks
yesterday. "The installation of a
park system is useless unless students
can prove that they know how tq use
the present campus." He urged the
usual "keep off the grass" campaign,
believing that much good can be ef-
fected by various campus organiza-
tions expressing themselves in favor
of the movement.
Walks will be constructed along the
present drives north to North Uni-
versity avenue and south to Universi-
ty hall, and a catch basin will be plac-
ed at the Memorial building corner,
preventing flooded condition of walks.
Work on the new power house site
is progressing rapidly now that good
weather is allowing the men to put
in full time on the job. The excava-
tion is practically completed and the
concrete work is being pushed to com-
pletion in order to be ready for the
big steel girders and beams which will
be hoisted into place early next week.
At that time the present force of 30
men will be augmented by 20 more
(Continued on page 4.)
experienced steel workers.
SCHOOLCARNIVAL
A miniature "Mardi Gras," featur-
ing confetti-covered joy-seekers,
"barkers," and hucksters shouting
their wares, jeweled queens and tri-
umphant kings galore, greeted the
crowd at the high school carnival last

I

If

Water Can be Lowered Durng Day
Another General Search
Is Planned.

Owing to the swiftness of the cur-
rent in the river yesterday, it was
impossible to thoroughly search the
bottom, and consequently no new de-,
Velopments were reported in the hunt
for Miss Ella Rysdorp. . However,
five one hundred pound storage bat-
teries were constructed in the elect-
rival laboratories of the university
yesterday afternoon. These were
used' to give power to a huge electric
light which was fastened to a large
fiat boat manned by fifteen students,
who continued the hunt through the
night.
The authorities in charge of the
Barton dam shut off the water after
midnight, but jio results followed,
Prof. C. P. Johnston's classes in sur-
veying were excused in the afternoon
to enable the men to aid in the search.
but the high water prevented much
work.
If the water can be lowered today,
it is planned to conduct another gen-
eral search like the one carried on
Thursday, but unless such a condi-
tion can be brought about, the author-
ities will continue the work with the
small, but well organized, party that
has been working since the accident
occurred.
Report of Engagement Denied.
Owing to an unauthorized report
handed in to The Michigan Daily the
announcements of the engagements
of Miss Alice Wiard and Miss Mildred
Reiss were printed in yesterday's
paper. The announcement of the en-
gagements have been denied by both
parties.
Tea Room Luncheons Are Resumed..
Newberry hall's tea room lunch-
eons, which were discontinued during
the vacation, have been resumed again
for university women 12:00 to 1:00
and 3:00 to 5:00 o'clock today.

Germans Hold "Gemnetlichkeitsfest"
Members' of the Deutscher Verein
and their guests assembled in Bar-
bour Gym at a "Gemuetlichkeitsfest"
last night. A short program of music
and poetry was followed by dancing.
Pretzels formed an essential part of
the refreshments and cider was also
served.
Soph Prom Plans Are Completed.
Practically all plans for the Sophj
Prom have been completed and the
number of tickets has been limited to
160. The programs, which are to be
printed in Philadelphia will be dis-
tinctly novel and the dances, 30 in
number, will last till 2:00 o'clock. ?

night.
The minstrels started the revels as
soon as the doors were thrown open,
and they were wildly applauded when
Bruce J. Miles, '14, and "Bill" Wil-
liams, '14E, joined them in a musical
vaudeville stunt. Then came the
hornpipe and butterfily dances, with
the Fi-Fi chorus encoring. After them
followed the Spinsters convention in
which Miss Ruth Forshee, School of
Music, and Miss Mary Haynes, '15,
starred in the role of officerm of "the
Single Blessedness club." The entire
cast was made up of university girls.
former pupils of the high school. Hob-
by shows, comic operettas, and a clev-
erly arranged fishing pond and post-
office made up a few of the other at-
tractions.
The carnival will renew the iner-
riment this afternoon and evening,
and the high school authorities hope
to double the fund which was collect-
ed last night, the entire proceeds of
which will go toward the purchase
and equipment of an athletic field.
1UIvErQITV UV AiU

.. ° u .

it Sale, at Wahr's
tate Street Store,
'urday,11-12 am.

EVER

A

The famous old Eng-
lish Morality play.

I

URJIlV fla)h LL
Saturday, April 19
8:15 P. M.
One Perforniance Only

With Edith Wynne Matthison, originator of the part of Everyman in America.

4-6 pm,.

Personal

Direction

of

BEN

GREET

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