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April 18, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-18

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i

IORNING PAPER IN
ANVN ARBOR.

1

The

Michigan

Daily

READ DILY BY
I 5,000 STUDENTS.

I

XXIII, No. 137.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 18,, 1913.

PRIOR FiviU

PRACTICE

;LUDES FOR
iERVE GAME

aseball Rehearsals Have Ended for
Week and Varsity is Ready
For the Clevelanders
Tomorrow.
EAM WILL GO TO DETROIT
TO SEE BIG LEAGUERS TODAY

tance Will Probably Pitch;
of Lineup to Remain
the Same.

Rpst

chigan has concluded her base-
practice for the game' against'
ern Reserve of Cleveland to be
ed on Ferry field tomorrow after-
. at 2:30 o'clock. Today the mem-
of the Varsity will be the guests
:ach Branch Rickey at the game
een Detroit and the St. Louis club
.e ,American league at Detroit.
astern Reserve comes to Ann Ar-
with a strong lineup. Several of
players who will face the Varsity'
rrow appeared in last season's
, which was a good exhibition of
ball. Quaintance is slated to do
heaving for the Varsity, and the
Rickey will send against the
elanders will probably not vary
the lineup used against Alma,
s it is in the matter of left field
ight field. Sisler will probably
in center garden and Captain Bell

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Friday,
fair; shifting winds, south to west.
University Observatory-Thursday,
7:00 p. in., temperature, 55.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
67.1; minimum temperature, 24 hours
preceding, 35.0; average wind veloc-
ity 7 miles per hour.
Dr. Vaughan to Speak in Philadelphia
Dr. Victor C. Vaughan will appear
before the Philosophical society of
America at a meeting in Philadelphia
this afteinoon. He will read a paper
on "Fever, Its Nature and Signifi-
cance."
SING SONGS OF
OLD MICHIGAN IN
WESTERN LANDS
Combined Musical Clubs Return From
Most Successful Tour
in History of the
Organizations.
CROWDED HOUSES GREET
MUSICIANS EVERYWHERE
Alumni Associations Entertain Song-
sters at Smokers and
Dinners.
With the return of the combined mu-
sical clubs yesterday afternoon on the
"Wolverine Special" from the Pacific
coast, the Muse of Music proudly and
smilingly draws the curtain on one of
the most successful and pleasant trips
ever taken by the Michigan musical
organizations. Throughout the entire

MANY STUDENTS
SEARCH IN VAIN
FOR LOST BODY
Four Hundred, in Canoes, Hunt Dur-
ing Afternoon For Missing
Remains of Miss Ella
Rysdorp.
LARGE NUMBERS RESPOND
TO CALL OF PRES. HUTCHINS

Canoeists With. Pike Poles Form
Three Lines and Drift
Down River.

SPEED BOYS TO
RUN FOR PLACE
IN PENN GAMES
Trainer Farrell Announces Final Try-
outs for Positions on the'
Teams That Go to
Philadelphia.
FIRST HEATS SCHEDULED
FOR 2:30 P. M. TOMORROW.

GREEN CHRYSANTHEMUMS TO.
BLOSSOM IN BOTANY DEPT.
Four chrysanthemums guaranteed to
bear green flowers have been received
by Prof. Henri Hus, of the botany de-
partment, fromt the royal gardens of
Vienna.
The plants are rare and are proba-
bly the only specimens in the United

in
I

Veterans Are Rounding Into
Condition; Freshmen Also
Improve.

Good I States.

Organized under a call from Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins, nearly 400
students spent yesterday afternoon in
a vain attempt to locate the missing
body of Miss Ella Rysdorp. The water
was rather high because both wheels'
on the big Barton dam were running,
and this made a close search impossi-
ble.
Last evening the hunt was contin-
ued, the men using torches. The dam
was closed after midnight, and it was
hoped that with low water, the party
(Continued on page 3.)
SENIORS NAMED TO,
SUPERVISE EXHIBIT
Engineering Department to Conduct
Big Display During May
Festival.

{

Some indication of the speed that
Michigan will present to the eastern
universities in the Varsity and fresh-
man mile relays, will be afforded to-
morrow when Trainer Farrell has
planned to hold trials in these races.
Anyone with talent in the 440 yard dis-
tance is extended an invitation by the
trainer to list himself among the can-
didates. First heats will be run
promptly at 2:30 on Ferry field.
Those veterans who were so slow
in gaining their proper form, have
(Continued on page 2.)
NOTED SOCIALIST
TO SPEAK TONIGHT
William L. Garver, of Missouri, Will
Lecture in Newberry Hall
at 8:00 O'clock.

SENTEGRANTS
TRiP TO CHICAGO
FOR 1913.OPERA
Council Gives Permission For Two
Performances of Annual Show
in Windy City Next
mouth.
WILL PROBABLY BE STAGED
AT THE ILLINOIS THEATEWs
Cast, Chorus, and Committees of 100
Men to Be Taken on
Special Train.
Permission was granted for the pre-
sentation of the 1913 Union opera in'
Chicago by the senate council last
night. The only stipulation is that it
must be staged either on May 10 or
24 and that the arrangements must
meet with the approval of the non-
athletic committee.
This is the first time that a Union
opera will have been given outside of
Ann Arbor. Efforts have been made
for a number of years to have the op-
era go out of town but the senate
council heretofore denied the petitions.
About 100 men will be taken to Chi-
cago, including the entire cast all but
16 of the chorus and only those com-
mittees that are especially needed. The
show will probably be given on May
10 at the Illinois theater and two per-
formances will be staged The men in
the opera will be taken in a special
train, which will leave Friday evening
arriving in the Windy City Saturday
morning. The return will be made
Saturday night.
'(Continued on page 4.)

Bill For Appropriation of $375,000 to
Erect Proposed Structure
Passes Senate 'Unan-
imously.
}
ACTIVE WORK WILL BEGIN
UPON GOVERNOR'S SIGNATURE.
Will Be Located on Site of Psychology
Laboratory; to Accom-
modate 1,500.
By unanimous vote the state senate
yesterday noon granted the appropria-
tion of $375,000 for a new science
building for the university. The bill
also passed the house by unanimous
vote Saturday afternoon but was not
taken to the senate until Tuesday. The
five day rule of the senate did not hold
as the bill was printed fand in the
hands of the senators a week ago last
Saturday.
The new structure will be placed
between the law and chemistry build-
ings and will take the place of the old
psychology laboratory. The building
will be of the same general design as
the chemistry building and will be
one-fourth larger than the latter struc-
ture. Accommodations will be made
for more than 1,500 students which
will exceed by 300 the capacity of the
chemistry building.
The plans for the new building have
niot been drawn but just as soon as
Governor Ferris signs the bill active
preparations will begin and the struc-
ture will be rushed to completion.
"I am delighted that the appropria-
tion bill passed the senate," said Pres'-
ident Harry B. Hutchins yesterday.
"The fact that it passed both houses
unanimously shows that the legisla-
ture and the people of the state are
with the university and interested in
its welfare."
"The passage of the bill by the sen-
ate is most gratifying," declared Sec-
retary Shirley Smith. "I do not antici-
pate any trouble with the governor and
feel confident that he will sign the
measure."
J.M. Barrett,'16, Kept Home by Illness
James M. Barrett, '16, of Fort
Wayne, Ind., while at home spring
vacation was taken ill with an attack
of the mumps. He will not return
to the university for at least two
weeks. Barrett is a member of the Psi
Upsilon fraternity.

UNIVERSITY'S DREAM OF NEW
SCIENCE BUILDING IS REALIT

EXTENSIVE PLANS ARE DRAWN. ITO DISCUSS PUBLIC OWNERSHIP.

e as

program the musical clubs played to
crowded houses, experienced the most
cordial treatment, and made a decided

I

iown at the meeting
visors and freshmen
Union is to be taken
the success of the
there is no doubt
e of the plan. Nearly
niors, juniors and
, got acquainted, and
a1 talks by those in-

hn R. Effinger, in speaking
nefits of an advisory system
.e system will have an edu-
value, for it will benefit
w in school when they get
the world. I can only wish
the system develops, there
elop also cooperation from
David Fr-iday, in giving the
)f the plan, said, "It will give
imen new ideals which he
t get otherwise. It will devel-
ea of democracy, that idea of
chigan is so proud." .
)eahl, representing the fresh-
rocated an extention of the
proposed system, saying that
est number of freshmen pos-
uld be reached. "The time
'st-year man needs advice is
ery beginning of the year,
is an absolute stranger."
was furnished, by the fresh-
.estra. Rolfe Spinning chair-
ie senior advisory board pre-'
[and in Coupons at Once.
pons for the recording of se-
eports in the literary depart-
uld be handed in at once to
trar's office. Registrar Hall
a new ruling that no student
ve a report of this semester's
ess the coupon is handed in.

success financially.
Bruce Bromley, singing his "Friar"
song from the opera of "Contrarie
Mary~," was featured in every concert,
and the song scored a big hit. Waldo
Fellows, in the encore to the "Friar"
song, was well received in "Things
They Never Say." The "Song of
Prince Rupert's Men" and the "Mid-
Night Sons Quartet" were among the
other features on the trip.
At the University of Minnesota the
Michigan song "I Want to go Back to
Michigan" was given an ovation,' the
students shouting for encore'after en-
core. Michigan alumni associations in
Madison, Wis:, and in Minneapolis,
Minn., where the musicians rendered
their last concerts, entertained the
clubs at smokers and dinners.
In speaking of the tour "Dick" Sim-
mons, president of the glee club said,
"Never have the combined musical
clubs of Michigan enjoyed a more suc-
cessful or pleasant trip."
CAMPUS FLAG REGULATIONS
PASSED BY AUDITING BOARD
To Have Three Weather Flags; Deaths
of Officers to Be
Honored.
Resolutions requiring the campus
flag to be raised at 8:00 o'clock in the
morning and lowered in the afternoon
at 5:00 o'clock were passed' by the
auditing board of the university yes-
terday afternoon. Three flags are to
be used, a fair weather one of mod-
erate size, one for stormy weather of
small size and a large flag for special
occasions.
On the death of a university or state
officer, whom it is proper to honor,
the flag will be lowered to half mast
on order from the president or secre-
tary.
"I think that some appropriate cer-
emonies should be had in regard to
raising and lowering the flag," said
Secretary Shirley W. Smith yesterday.
"It would be a good custom to have
some honor society or committee from'
the senior* class in charge of the fes-
tivities. This is merely a suggestion
of mine and I hope that some of the,

Committees for the engineering ex-
hibit, which is to be given in the engi-
neering building during May festival
week, have been selected. Saul Saul-
son, '12E, as general chairman, will
have general supervision of the whole
affair, and will be assisted by the
chairman of the departmental commit-
tees. The following seniors have been
appointed to the committetes:
Electrical-W..B. Kopfer, chairman;
W. F. Davidson, R. C. Hain, I. E. Lat-
timer, G. T. Glasgow.
Civil-G. F. Brown, chairman; J. W.
Follin, T. McGivney, F. Gibbs, J.
Krauss, S. Mills, W. T. Schuett, B.
Pritchard.
Mechanical-S. Saulson, chairman;
G. H. Bancroft, W. F. Freund, S. R.
Thomas, E. R. Hartsig, E. F. Hyde, E.
J. Bennett, G. L. Merrill, W. S. Hopkin,
(Continued on page 3.)
ADELPHI WINS FROM ALPHA NU
Society Is Awarded Decision in Pre-
liminary Debate.
Adelphi society was given unani-
mous decision in the preliminary cup
debate with the Alpha Nu society last
night on the question, Resolved that
the Presidential term be extended to
six years, and that no president be
eligible for reelection. Speakers of
the winning team were: Harry Park-
er '15, Nathaniel Goldstick '15, and
Isador Becker '15. Alpha Nu team
was composed of Charles Lockwood
'14, Jacob Levin '15, and Lawrence
Sprague '14. The decision was given
by attorney Otto E. Haab, L. S. Hul-
bert, and W. W. Sleator.
Tonight Webster and Jeffersonian
societies will debate the same puestion,
and the winner of this debate will
oppose Adelphi society in the final
debate which will be held on May 9.
Union Dance Tickets Are on Sale.
Tickets for the regular weekly mem-
bership dance at the Union tomorrow
night were placed on sale yesterday
afternoon. The committee in charge
of this week's function consists of
Maurice Lohman, '14M, E. J. Miller,
'14, and James Bond, '14.
J Engineers Pay Dues Today.
Junior engineer class dues will be
collected today from 8:00 to 12:00 a.
m. and from 1:00 to 3:00 p. m. in the
rooms of the engineering society on

AUDITORIUM WILL OPEN WITH MAY FESTIVAL

William L. Garver, recently a can-
didate for the gubernatorial office in
Missouri, will deliver the fourth lec-
ture in the Lyceum course, brought
here by the Intercollegiate Socialist
society, in Newberry hall tonight at
8:00 o'clock. His subject will be
"What Socialists Want."
Mr. Garver, who is a prominent lec-
turer in the socialist movement, is an
architect by profession, and received
his education at Westminster College
and the University of Missouri. He
was one of a number who founded the
utopian colony of Topolobampo in Sin-
aloa, Mexico, some years ago, and after
the colony failed, turned socialist
His lecture will have much to do:
with the concentration of industries
(Continued on page 4.)

J

Engagements.
ere made yester-
nts of Miss Mil-
Alice Wiard to R.

When the annual May festival be.
gins on Wednesday, May 14, the
new Hill auditorium will be thrown
open to the public for the first time,
and the music fest will have a setting
worthy of its importance.
Work on the auditorium is progress-
ing speedily. The stage is large and
roomy and well proportioned. Waiting

sololists, artists and others. A lift has
been prepared in the middle of the

stage by means of which pianos and ready the seats are in place in the first
other paraphernalia may be easily and second balconies. Plenty of aisles

For a week a force of men have been
at work installing the seats and al-

brought in and removed.
The organ, which has never been
displayed to advantage in University
hall, has been entirely remodeled and
occupies commodious quarters back of
the stage. This space was particular-

have been arranged for, and in no case
will there be more than 15 or 16 seats
in one bank, while in most blocks the
number will not exceed a dozen.
Back of the first balcony is a spa-

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