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April 16, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

e

.j

Mi higan

Daly

I LOCAL $1.5O 00

p

135.,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16., 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

_ _
.._

TOSSERS

RE FOR

A CONTEST

ich Rickey Sends Squad Through
Stiff Workout in Prepar.Xten
For Contest With
Visitors.
NEUP FOR TODAY'S GAl1IE
HAS NOT BEEN ANNvUNCED.
ler Will Play in Field i i He
Does Not Work on
Mound.
f a real hard workout will prepare
,higan's Varsity baseball team for
opening game of the hon_ season
,inst Alma this afternoon, the Var--
y is prepared to give the visiting
sbyterians a stiff argumerLt.
'esterday Coach Rickey " :ut the
rsity squad through all ins :aces.
nmencing with batting pr ctice in
cage, and including a stif' drill in
ling, the practice ended with some
1 competition in the nature of sev-
1 innings of battling.
ickey has not settled fully on his
tle front, according to the way he
d the Varsity up for yesterday af-
ioon's work.
fughitt was used at third, Baker at
ond, and Pontius at first on the
sity nine, making considerable of
hift, for Baker played at third in
t of the games on the southern
while Hughitt played at second
third, and Pontius alternated with
ward at the initial sack. Howard
not in uniform yesterday, how-
r, and this may have accounted for
change. Howard is suffering from
anged-up'knee secured on the trip
th.
Thether . Sisler will pitch today's
ae or not is a question. Sisier play-
in the middle garden yesterday.
higan fans want to see Sisler pitch
Ly's game, but if he does not work
:he mound he will take part in the.
te.
Coach Rickey uses the lineup in
Ly's game that he was experiment-
with yesterday, Hughitt will prob-
act as Michigan's lead-off man in
batting order. Baker will bat sec-
Bell third and Sisler fourth in
probability, with Lavans and Rog-

T"E WEATHER MAN
Foecast fox' Ann Arbor - Wednes-
day fair, warmer, -moderate winds.
Uiuver-sity Observatory-Tuesday,
7:C0 p. mi. temperature 53.4; maximum
temperature 24 hours preceding 59.3;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 30.0; average wind velocity, 6
miles per hour.
PROF. J. C. KNOWLTON WILT.
MEET CLASSES NEXT WEEK.
Prof. J. C. Knowlton of the law de-
partment will meet his classes in con-
tracts next week. He arrived in Ann
Arbor April 8 after his first vacation
in 25 years, his early return .from the
south being necessitated by the con-
tinued ill health of Mrs. Knowlton.
Prof. and Mrs. Knowlton left Ann
Arbor March 16, expecting to remain
in the south until about May 1, but ear
trouble contracted by Mrs. Knowlton
made the change in plans imperative.
The couple went as far south as New
Orleans.
MANY ARTISTS
TO APPEAR IN
MAY FESTIVAL

ACTORS REHEARSE
FOR CERCLE PLAY

Annual Production of French
to Be Given on
April 25.

WILL HOLD RELAY
TRIALS SATURDAY
Runners Will Try Out For Varsity and
Freshmen Mile Relay
Teams.
HAFF MAY RHUN IN TWO EVENTS.

Societyl

MI. RENE TALAMON WILL DIRECT.
Final rehearsals are under way for
"Les Fourberies de Scapin," the Moli-
ere farce which will be given as the
annual production of the Cercle Fran-
cais at the Whitney theater on Friday
evening, April 25. Members of the
cast spent the spring vacation learning
their lines, and are now letter perfect
in their parts. The remaining two
weeks will be devoted to the finishing
and polishing process.
It is a typical farce of Moliere that
has been selected this year, and one of
his most laughable and spontaneous.
"Les Fourberies de Scapin" is a con-
stant favorite in France, and has in
recent years been much played in
translation.
M. Rene Talamon will again act as
director of the play. A. F. Hulburt of
the French department, well known
for his delightful comedy playing in
several other Cercle Francais produc-
tions, will take the title part of Scapin.
The two fathers, Geronte and Argante,
will be played by M. Talamon and Cy-
ril Quinn, and the two amorous sons,
Octave and Leandre, by Robert Tanna-
hill and Mark Wisdom. They will
make love to Misses Mildred B. Guil-
ford and Elaine Shields as Zerbinette
and Hyacinte, respectively. Waldo
Fellows will take the role of Sylves-.
tre, the valet of Octave.

CLUBS

Tryouts for Michigan's Varsity mile
relay team, and the freshmen mile re-
lay team, will take place Saturday.
This was announced by Trainer Far-
rell during today's workout of the
track men.
Definite time for the trials was not
announced by the Michigan train-
er, as he is desirous of
consulting with Captain Haff
and arranging the tryouts when
it is most convenient to all concerned.
The tryouts may occur late in the af-
ternoon, as Trainer Farrell does not
think it advisable for the men to run
soon after the lunch hour.-"'
Tryouts for the two mile team will
not occur until Monday or Tuesday
according to the trainer. Farrell
wishes to give the half-milers a little
more time in which to prepare, as
J Carver's inability to compete, has put
a little crimp in prospects for the
longer distance team.
Captain Haff may try out in both the
mile and two mile competition. Haff's
place on the mile quartet is assured.
It is intimated among the track men
that the captain may also participate
in the half in order to bolster up the
weakening team, if he can do the half
mile without weakening his quarter.
Michigan's Varsity mile quartet
did not fare well in the draw-
ing for positions in the re-
lay games to be* held April
26, taking fifth place. In the two-mile
Ievent Michigan was more fortunate in

Musical Organizations Give Last
Concert Tonight,
Michigan's band of songsters and
mandolinists are expected to return to
Ann Arbor tomorrow morning, flushed
with their many successes in the mid-
dle-west, and on "he coast.
The clubs start for Michigan imme-
diately upon the conclusion of their
program in Madison, Wis., tonight.
Alumni associations have shown
their. interest in the clubs by enter-
taining them, and boosting for crowd-
ed houses at the concerts. The entire
trip has been a decided success, the
clubs playing to large and apprecia-
tive audiences at every stop.
Engineers Return From Spring Trip,
The 45 engineering students of the
mechanical and electrical depart-
ments, who have been touring through
the east during vacation on their an-
nual inspection trip, will return this
morning. Prof. S. J. Zowski, Mr. H.
R. Lloyd and Mr. J. F. Wilson, who su-
pervised the parties will also return
at this time.
A PPR PRIATE
$375vOOO FO
NEW BUILDING

WILL RETURN TOMORROW

RECOVER ONE
VICTIM FROM
BED OF HURON

J. W. Morrison, '14, and W.
lace, '15, Find Remains of
H, Bacon Near Old
Pulp Mill

K. Wal-
John

SEARCHERS BELIEVE OTHER
BODIES ARE ABOVE ARGO DAM

Barton Dam Shut Off Water'
3Iidniglt to Aid in
Search.

at

Madame Schumann-Heink to.
List of Famous Singers
and Grand Opera
Stars.

Head

.ame will be called at 4:05,
ations have been made for
wd c1' Michigan supporters.
U' EATE ADVISORY
TE3 FOR YEAR 19I3-14-

Juniors, and Freshmen.
Meet at Smoker
Thursday.

HEAVY SEAT SALE INDICATES
AUDITORIUM WILL BE FILLED
Frederick Stock's Orchestra and Two
Choruses Will Complete
Program.
Many of the world's most famous.
artists are on the program for the
1913 May Festival which opens Wed-
nesday May 14, in the new Hill audi-
torium. Heading the list is Madame
Schumann-Heink, generally known as
the "world's best loved singer." From
the Metropolitan Opera company will
be Madame Marie Rappold, Lambert
Murphy;, P squale Amato and William
Hinshaw. , Putnam Griswold has been
forced to withdraw from the program
and those in charge have secured Mr.
Hinshaw, who ranks as one of the
best singers in th Metropolitan Opera
company to take his place. Miss Ros-
alie Wirthlin, a contralto, will make
her first appearance in Ann Arbor:
Miss Florence Hinkle will be remem-
bered for the fine impression she made.
last year. Henri Scott comes from
the Chicago-Philadelphia Opera com-
p any.
In addition to these artists there
will be Prof. A. A. Stanley and the
Choral Union and special childrens'
choruses, and Frederick Stock with
his famous orchestra. Never before
at any previous, festival has there
been such a program of well known
artists and this year's entertainment
promises to be the "best ever."
The seat sale will exceed that of pre-
vious years and the new auditorium
will not be any too large to accommo-
date the crowd.
Large numbers of circulars have
been mailed throughout the state and
many mail orders are coming in.
Laws Have Special Exams This Week.
Supplementary examinations for law
students, who under the new marking
system, will need higher marks in
various subjects in order to graduate
this June, will be held Thursday, Fri-
day and Saturday of this week. The
time for these examinations is set at
3:00 and 7:00 o'clock.

F nnthall Mnnfnr in f!nndno#. Cnrinv I

Practice. getting first position, while in the
Coach Fielding H. Yost will arrive freshmen mile quartet contest second
in Ann Arbor this morning, according place was secured for the Wolverines.
to a telegram received by Director
P. G. Bartelme last night. Although COMMUNICATION.
there will probably be no practice to- Editor, Michigan Daily:
day, because of the Alma baseball At Leland Stanford the entire con-
game on Ferry field, the coach will be trol of all matters relating to student
in the athletic office as soon as he ar- activities, as well as to examinations,
rives, and is desirous of meeting all is left entirely to the student body.
the football men there. The effect of the system is most no-
Shoes and jerseys will be given out, ticeable in the examinations, where
and the annual spring outdoor practice one seems to be surrounded by such
will begin tomorrow. The training an element of moral influence that he
will last two weeks, and Coach Yost feels no inclination to cheat in any
will probably be present ten days of manner. Each student feels that he,
that time. Whether any new features and he alone, is responsible for his ac-
will be introduced into the spring tions, and he feels that if he does any-
work this year is not known, as the thing wrong, he will, not only suffer
coach has given no intimation of such the remorse of his conscience, but will
a move. incur the disfavor of his fellow stu-
dents. This feeling alone, and not the
MISS BIGELOW STARTS CLASS. fear of being told upon, is, I believe
responsible for the very small amount
Childrens' Games and Dances Will Be !of cheating done; for so great is the
Taught to Women. sentiment against cribbing or cheat-
Under the direction of Miss Cather- ing in any manner that the person who
ine Bigelow a normal class in chil- does it is regarded in a manner akin
dren's games and folk dances starts to that in which we hold a cowardly
practical work this week in Barbour thief.
gym. This class is organized to give But when there is a case that needs
women who want to take up play- attention, it is referred, not to the fac-
ground work in the summer a prepar- ulty, but to a.group of students chosen
atory training. The class at present from the student body for this purpose.
numbers 35. At the beginning of the examination

COACH YOST ARRIVES TODAY.

House Passes Bill Granting Amount
Requested by University
For New Science
Structure.
SENATE WILL NOT TAKE UP
ME ASURE UNTIL SATURDAY
Secretary Smith Experts Favorable
Action by Upper
Body.
A bill appropriating $375,000 for a
new science building for the university
was passed by the house at .ansing
Monday afternoon. The measure is
now before the senate, but will not
come up for discussion in that body
until Saturday owing to a rule in the
senate that bills originating in the
house cannot be considered by the up-
per body until five days have elapsed
after passage in the house.
The amount which the house bill al-
lows is the exact amount that was
asked for by the university. Univer-
sity authorities do not look for any
opposition in the senate and are con-
fident that the appropriation will be
granted by that body.
"The appropriation bill has passed
one mile post in its journey to the
governor," said Secretary Shirley W.
Smith yesterday. "I do not look for
any opposition in the senate, and I am
confident that the governor will not,
veto the'bill should it pass the senate."
HUGH CHALMERS EMPHASIZES
IMPORTANCE OF PUBLICITY.
"The one great object of manufac-
turing is the successful distribution of
goods and successful distribution is
accomplished through publicity, which
is salesmanship and advertising," em-
phasized Hugh Chalmers, president of
the Chalmers Motor -company, in a
speech delivered at the Commerce
club smoker held at the Union last
night.
Prof, Jones Prepares Business Book..
"An Idea of the Administration" is
the title of a book now being'
prepared by Prof. E. D. Jones.
Three chapters, which have ap-
peared in recent issues of the
Engineering magazine, have been
published in pamphlet form as "Prin-
ciples of Administration in Business."

Almost wholly covered by sand, the
body of John H. Bacon, '15, was found
in the Huron river opposite the old
pulp mill yesterday afternoon by J.
W. Morrison, '14, and W. K. Wallace,
'15.. The body was identified as that
of Bacon by dark hair and an identifi-
cation card that was found in one of
his pockets. The body was in a good
state of preservation, considering the
fact that it had been in the water for
16 days.
The discovery was made at 2:45
o'clock. Morrison and Wallace were
rowing back and forth on the right
side of the river near the site of the
old pulp mill, when Morrison passed
what looked like a stone almost cover-
ed by sand. The water was low, and
a second glance showed that the
"stone" was the body of one of the
drowned students. The body was
brought to the surface immediately
with a pike pole.
Bacon's remains were taken to
Muehlig's undertaking establishment.
The father and brothers of the unfor-
tunate student have been in the city
since the tragedy and will take the
body to their home at Pontiac this
morning on the 11:12 train on the
Michigan Central.
Morrison and Wallace, the men
who found the body are two of the
party of Grand Haven students who
organized for the search, pledging
themselves not to stop until the re-
mains were recovered, or all hope of
discovering them abandoned. Both men
have worked steadily since the first
day after the tragedy, remaining here
during vacation to aid in the hunt.
They will receive the reward of $50,
offered for the recovery of the first
victim.
News reached here yesterday that
the piece of woman's skirt which was
found in the river last week and sent
Jto the home of Miss Ella Rysdorp for
identification, did not belong to -the
unfortunate woman. This informa-
tion tends to strengthen the belief of
the searchers that the remains of the
other two victims will be found above
the Argo dam. While it is impossible
to tell with any degree of definiteness
where the bodies will be located, both
Prof. C. E. Johnston, and Morrison,
who are leading the efforts to recover
the remains, state that they believe
that they will be found in the Argo
pond.
Search All Night With Torches.
The search which has been carried
on continuously since the accident, re-
ceived an added impetus with there-
covery of Bacon. Those engaged in
the hunt did not stop with the darkness
yesterday, continuing throughout the
night by means of torchlight. All boats
that could be used were engaged and
many canoes were also pressed into
service to accommodate the number
that sought to locate the other two
missing bodies. The light company
did all in, its power to aid, shutting
off the water at the big Barton dam
after midnight. This made the river
(Continued on page 4.)

wl 1

rhe senior advisory system for the
Lr 1913-1914 will be inaugurated
ursday night at the smoker to be
'en by the senior advisors and the
shmen at the Union. All juniors
o expect to act as advisors next
ir will be asked to attend the affair'
d sign up as they enter the door.
ey will be permitted to attend the
oker by purchasing a ticket for 25
its.
4 committee of 15 seniors and 15
shmen appointed by President Pel-'
n of the fresh lits, will have charge
the affair under the direction of the
ior advisory committee composed
Rolfe Spinning, Eben E. Lane,
em" Quinn and Claudius G. Pendill.
Ihort talks will be given by mem-
s of the senior and freshmen class-
and also by members of the faculty.
sic will be furnished by the Varsity
e club quartet and the freshmen
hestra.

Each girl is taught one game and
one dance and she in turn instructs
the others, so that the students are
both scholars and instructors. Many of
the women have had experience in
playground work.
Senior Laws Will Meet Tomorrow.
There will be a meeting of the 1913
law class in room C of the law build-
ing Thursday, April 17, at 4:00 o'clock.
The class will decide how the senior
reception is to be financed. If it is the
will of the class and the alumni secre-
tary-treasurer, committees will be se-
lected and other important business
put before the class. ,

(Continued on page 2.)

PEOPLE ELECT NEW REGENT
AND RETURN DR. SAWYER.
Walter H. Sawyer, '84H, and Victor
M. Gore, '82L, were elected regents of
the university for the term expiring
December 31, 1919, at the state elec-.
tion April 7. Both of the men are re-
publicans. Regent Sawyer was re-
elected by a comfortable majority. J.
J. Comstock, '83L, who was appointed
by Gov. Ferris to fill out the unexpir-
ed term caused by the death of Regent
J. H. Grant, lost the election on the
democratic ticket.

a ..

it

Sale, at Wahr's
e Street Store,
Opens
iesday, Apr. 16
2:00 P. M.
legs to
A. ST1RAUSS

EVERY

A

The famous old Eng-
lish Morality play.

UNIVERSITY HALL

With Edith Wynne Matthison, originator of the part of Everyman in America.

saturday, April 19
8:15 P. M.
One Performance Only

Persona

Dire ction

of

BEN

GREET

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