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March 27, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-27

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AIL $2.00

I

The

MicW1gan

Daly

I LOCAL $1.50
I MALL $2.00

a

No. 125.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1913

PRIGu TTVA C

ST STAGING-
UNION SHOW
WAKES IG HITI
arie Mary" Replete with "Best
r" Plot, Music, Acting and
Scenery Wins Instant
Approval.
IN 1913 PRODUCTION
TED AS RECORD BREAKING
of, Principals and Choruses is
Basis For Favorable
Comment.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Cloudy to-
day, warmer tomorrow.
University Observatory-Wednesday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 25.8; maximum
temperature 24 hours preceding, 31.2;
minimum temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 25.0; wind velocity, 4 miles per
hour; precipitation, 0.2 inches.
OVER1WORI( COMPELS PROFESSOR
TO GIVE UP COLLEGE DUTIES.
Starting Michigan back to the west-
ern conference as well as many other
committee duties have caused Prof. A.
S. Whitney to leave his classes and
seek recuperation at Mt. Clemens,
Mich., following a general breakdown.
Prof. Whitney left for there yesterday
and will not resume his college work
until after spring vacation.
During his absence his classes will
be taken care of by Prof. C. O. Davis
and Prof. F. S. Breed:

*
*

* * * * * * * * *

FIRE

RAGESI

* HURON RIVER CATCHES
* FLOOD' BUG; CHICKENS
* 60 BOATING IN COOP.

f

i*

-0-
Not to be outdone-by its sister
streams, the mighty Huron,topic
of poem and song, has overflow-
ed its banks. Oldest inhabitants
view the rushing flood with awe
and speak respectfully of the
day some ten years ago when it
got as high as the railroad
tracks. So far the situation has
not become serious but it was
rumored that a well populated
chicken coop near the gas plant
has temporarily moved - down
stream.
The old wooden dam below the
boat house has stood the strain
bravely taking its example from
the new power structure just
completed near the water works.
In case the wooden dam gives
way it is estimated a wall of
water half a foot high will rush
down the valley. The fall of
snow last night will swell the
mighty volume and it is believed
the crest of the flood has not
yet been reached
*, . * , , , * ,*,

DAYTO

,;20
HOTE

DIE

I

MEDICS READY
TO LEAVE FOR

WATER RISES; CITIES
APPEAL FOR AID,

xcelling all predecessors in every
it that goes to make a musical
edy effective and entertaining,
ntrarie Mary", Vhe 1913 Michigan
on opera, made its initial bow to
public before a well-filled house
the Whitney theater last night
st Ever", much used term as it is,
t be seduced from the vocabulary
lescriibe the piece adequately, ac-
ling to those who witnessed the
ing performance.
plot, music, acting, singing and
,ery the show proved a winner.
moments, not infrequent char-
ristics of previous performances,
e lacking. Every number was
ed back for encorestime 'and
n, and the iron-hand exhibitions of
audience were far from being mere
;eness.
. Plot is Connected.
ie book for "Contrarie Mary" fur-
es a connected story,-in fact this
ne of the novelties of the 1913
v. Besides this, the author, Rob-
G. Beck, has contributed an en-
nment and setting highly suitable
musical opera purposes. All the'
ibilities of the situations have
played up to the limit.
king place in an ancient college
>sphere, with flood lights infusing
ince into the scenery surrounding
kfield Academy, the conditions are
. for the kind of scheming, danc-I
and merry-making that consti-l
an opera. Ruleff, who in every-
life is Norman Reed, woos Mari-7
G M. Moritz, with all the grace
eye-making of a true woodland1
-, and the love-making between
bert, alias G. E. McConley, andl
nne, D. Grinstead, is of an agree-
order.1

FROM NATION

FLOOD SCENE,

Saxophone Party to Be Prolonged.
The Wright Saxophone party at the
Union tonight will be prolonged in or-
der to gaccommodate those who will at-
tend the performance of "Contrarie
Mary." Tickets will be sold at the
door.

*
,*

TRAGIC STRAIN MINGLES WITH
0 MERRIMENT OF PERFORMERS

SMILES OF LEADING LADY CON-
CEAL ANXI1ETY AS TO WELFARE
OF RELATIVES,
Few of those who witnessed the per-
formance of "Contrarie Mary" last
night and laughed at the jokes, hum-
med to the music and applauded the
efforts of the actors, realized the trag-
dies and sacrifices underlying the
smiles and cavortings of the comedi-
ans.
Joe G. Turpin, '14,. reveling in , the
gorgeous clothes of a care free maiden,
carried with him the knowledge that
his home in Dayton was under twenty
feet of water and his mother and sister
were alone in that flood ridden city.
Late yesterday afternoon he received
word that his home was covered with
the flood, but no word came from his
mother and sister. His father and
brother are absent from the city. Un-
able to get word there, and with only
the uncertain knowledge that extra
editions brought him, he carried on his
part in the play.
The strains of the violins of the or-

s probably in regard to the m.sic
he 1913 opera has most complete-
tstripped all previous offerings
e local student stage. The mel-
composed by Willis A. Diekema,
V. .Moore, and Rowland Fixel,
f unusual merit, and not a musi-
Tering in the performance sinks
to mediocre rating. The music,
excellent, would lose much of its
iveness if it were not for the
of the singers. All the vocal
s were perfectly executed.
. Topical Song is Hit.
bably the biggest hit of the even-
ras the topical song, "Things
(Continued on page 4.)
IODS CUT OFF'
EIREESSREPORTS
over thirty hours the university
:ss has crashed forth in a vain,
vor to get news from the flood
en section of the country but
cally every effort has failed.
25 excellent wireless stations lo-
in different points in Ohio, the
t Cleveland alone has survived
struction. Calls for every known
n in Ohio have brought no re-
s and it is supposed that the bat-
of all the silent stations are sub-
d.
reland has sent in- what little
has reached that city
South Bend has oQten
from at intervals but ,au-
c information is hard to obtain.
ern and western wireless stations
ippealed to the station here for
iatiorn and the big static has not
quiet for ten minutes since the
ieager reports came in. The last
: received here told of the de-

chestra carried

a secret note of pathos.1

CLASS HEADS

WILL DISCUSS
HONORSYSTEM
Pres. Kemp of Union Calls Meeting of
Presidents to Consider Installation
of New Exam Plan
Here.
OFFICERS WILL GATHER AT
UNION UNDAY AFTERNOON.
Meth s in V u at Other Universities
Will Be Investigated
A meeting f all class presidents has
been called y President Kemp, of the
Michigan U on, for Sunday afternoon
at the clubh use to discuss the honor
system question.+
Further developments in the honor
system campaign will depend upon the
sentiment expressed at this informal
meeting. If it meets with sufficient
approval, the class presidents will be
formed into a permanent committee to
introduce the plans into the various
classes for consideration. Sub-com-
mittees will be appointed to investigate
the honor system throughout the coun-
try, and their recommendations as to
the system best adapted to Michigan
will be submitted at the close of the
spring recess.
The temporary committees will work
under the direction of the Michigan
Union. The meeting Sunday will be
presided over by one of the Union

Warren C. Breidenbach, '15, of Piqua,
0.; seated in the orchestra pit with his
violin tucked under his chin, wonder-
ed whether any of his beloved ones
were among the 540 inhabitants re-
ported to have been drowned there.
Hardly a word has been received from
that city except the meager accounts
of its reported destruction.
E. J. Busjahn, '14, of Logansport,
Ind., sang in the chorus 1-nowing that
the city was inundated but he had the
solace that so far no loss of life had
been reported from there and commun-
ication was still open.
ODSTERROR AMONG
Men From Deluged Districts Besiege
Telegraph Office Eagerly Seeking
News of Relatives and
Friends.
CRIPPLED RAILWAYS PREVENT
MANY FROM GOING TO HOMES
All day long yesterday and far into
the blizzardy night students whose
homes are situated within the flood
district crowded the telegraph offices,
haunted the long distance phone
booths, besieged the news stands for
"extras" and filed in and out of the
offices of the Michigan Daily, eagerly
seeking news from the deluged terri-
tory.
Hundreds of telegrams were filed at
the local offices destined for Dayton,1
Troy, Piqua, Fremont,and other points,
only to remain on the hook. All day
long the distance phone operators gave
the same answer, "No service to that
point." Late last night, after other of-
fices had closed, the students haunted
The Daily offices eagerly devouring ev-
ery report as it came in over the wir-
es.
Inquiries by the hundred poured in-
to the railroad companies' offices dur-
ing the day as to possible train service
and fear haunted students figured all
possible means of getting to their hom-
es. The report that the university hos-
pital staff was to go to the scene of the
disaster suggested a means, and all
reports of a relief train from Detroit
were eagerly scanned Not until the
last report suspending train service
south of Toledo was received did they
give up hope of leaving and resolve to
wait patiently for the hoped for news.
Over 400 students in the university
hail from the stricken territory. With
each message bringing additional trag-
ic news of the increasing disasters
many of these made frantic efforts to
(Continued on page 4.)

Ohio Governor's Appeal For Aid Comes
to University; Doctors and Nurses
Await Further Orders
to Start.
SENIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS
JOIN EMERGENCY TROUPE.
An appeal for help for the stricken
cities in flood covered Ohio has reach-
ed the university, and part of the medi-
cal staff of the general hosptial, a
large number of nurses and many
members of the senior medic class are
in readiness to leave at a moments
notice for- the scene of the disasters.
The order came in late yesterday af-
ternoon and immediately after receiv-
ing it, members of the staff, nurses
and students were notified to place
themselves ready for a telegram or-
dering them to start.
Gov. Cox, of Ohio sent an appeal for
medical help to Secretary Warnshuis,
of the Michigan State Medical society,
late yesterday ,afternoon. Dr. Warns-
huis immediately notified Regent Saw-
yer, of Hillsdale, who is president of
the organization, and the latter at
once communicated the order to Dr.
Reuben Peterson of the university hos-
pital.
As soon as the order was received
and the staff placed in readiness for
immediate departure, a wire was sent
to the Ohio governor, asking for in-
formation and stating that the force
was prepared to take departure. Up
to a late hour last night no further
word was heard from Gov. Cox, but
it is expected that the order will be
sent as soon as it becomes possible
to reach the stricken cities.
Good Festival Seats Still on Sale.
Choice seats for the May Festival re-
main in blocks "A" and "B." Seats in
block "A" are being sold at $6.00 each
and in block "B" for $5.00. Block "C"
seats are now on sale at $4.50. For
holders of pre-festival tickets, seats in
block "A" will be sold at $3.00 and
those in block "B" at $2.00. Seats in
block "C" will be disposed of at $1.50
to pre-festival ticket holders.

MEAGER REPORTS PREVENT IT
ESTIMATES OF, PERSONS LOST

-- Bulletin-2:00 A. M.
DETROIT, MICH., March 27.-An unconfirmed Associated Press report
received here tonight states that the fire raging in Dayton has destroyed the
Beckel Hotel, one of the largest hotels in the city. Over 200 people had tak-
en refuge there and it is believed that all perished. The building is said to
have burned to the water's edge and all were either burned or drowned.
It is impossible to get within ten 'miles of the stricken city. No estimate
of the dead can be made.
- Bulletin-1:30 A. M.
DETROIT, MICH., March 27.-Latest reports of Associated Press receiv-
ed here from the flood districts indicate that conditions are growing worse.
The waters are still rising slowly in Ohio but in Indiana the floods are grow-
ing with startling rapidity. Indianapolis reports increasing disasters from
all nearby points.
Bulletin-1:00 A M.
DETROIT,, MICH, March 27.-Long distance telephone from near Dayton
brings news of greater disaster. The flood is still rising. Fire has broken out
in several places in the center of the city and the business district seems
doomed. Rescue crews are unable to cope with the flames and the fire has
free sweep of the city. Hundreds who took refuge in office buldings,church-
es and other public buildings are in grave danger of death by fire or flood.
T T Bulletin-By Wireless.'
FREMONT, OHIO, March 27.-The captain of the Port Clinton Life Sav-
ing station was drowned here this afternoon while engaged in rescue work.
A relief train from Sandusky to flood stricken points is stalled here unable
to proceed further.
DAYTON, OHIO, March 27.-The crest of the great flood has passed but
the diminution of the water is slow. Estimates of the death list have fallen
somewhat but anywhere from 500 to 1,000 are reported drowned. In the bus-
iness section thousands are still marooned and the actual number of casual-
ties will not be known until the waters have receded. .Great fears are now
expressed that pestilence will follow on the heels of the flood and the gov-
ernment has been appealed to for tents and rations.
Cold, which may turn the drizzle into snow, is threatening the survivors
with death from exposure. Motor boats are being used to assist in the rescue
work as row boats cannot breast the current.
(Bulletin-Midnight.)
(Special by Detroit News Service.)
INDIANA-POLIS, IND., March 27.-The flood in Indiana is increasing in
volume and the crest has not yet been reached. Many points throughout the
state are sending out appeals for help and the situation is becoming grave.
It is estimated that 250 already have lost their lives here and the population
is fleeing to the highlands. The break of the Morris street levee here has
been followed by the breaking of many other smaller ones and the water is
creeping up over the entire city.
(By Wireless.)
CLEVELAND, OHIO, March 27.-Meager reports from Piqua indicate
that the crest of the flood has passed that point and the waters are receding
The condition is evidently improved there but famine and pestilence are
feared. No estimate has been made of the casualties but the first report of-
500 drowned has not been denied.
(Bulletin-Midnight.)
SOUTH BEND, IND., March 27.-A message reaching here tonight says
that Fremont is inundated. Eight are reported drowned. The property loss
will reach half a million. Appeals for help have been sent out.
(Bulletin-Midnight.)
DETROIT, MICH., March 27.-Plans are being made to attempt to run a
relief train through to the flood districts some time this morning. No time
has been set for the departure but it will probably leave as soon as loaded.
Surgeons, Nurses, and all sorts of supplies will be taken. .Railroad men are
sceptical as to whether it will get through.
Bulletin-11:30 P. M.
INDIANAPOLIS, IND., March 27-Reports received here from Peru
state that the flood is rising there. The entire city is under water and no re-
lief is in sight. It is estimated that 300 people have perished and that no
bodies have been recovered.
Bulletin-11:30 P. M.
DETROIT, MICH., March 27.-The flood at Troy is receding and it is be-
lieved that the immediate danger from the waters is past. No estimate has
been made of the casualities but it is believed that the death toll is .high.
Property loss is impossible to calculate. Relief for the sufferers will be
rushed through as fast as the awful conditions will allow....... .
(Special to The Michigan Daily.) k
DETROIT, MICH., March 27.-All train service south' of Toledo has
been indefinitely suspended and no trains can enter the flooded district until
further notice.

FOOTLIGHTS
OF

HIDE ANXIETY
UNION OPERA STAR

Joe S. Turpin.

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