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March 23, 1913 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE "ICHIGAN DAILY

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Going Away? Vacation?
Go away like a Prince.
You can do it for a Moderale price.
A suit shaped and draped to fit only
you and tailored-to-measure in accord
with your own ideas by our expert tai-
lormen, will contzibute to your pleasure
and profit.
That very best girl at home has an
eye for the fellow with smart tailored
clothes. It is none too early to order
if you don't want to B disappointed
when the train pulls out.

Suits to Order, $20 up

J. Karl Malcolm,

604 East Liberty

Malcolm Block

Henna & Stanger

Up-to-Date

1t

Furniture, Rugs, Carpets
Draperies
Goods of Quality at Lowest Prices

EXTENSION ADDRESSES FOR
THIS WEEK ARE ANNOUNCED
Faculty Members of Five Departments
Will Speak to Audiences
Throughout State.
Dean V. C. Vaughan, of the medical
department, begins the list of exten-
sion lectures for this week, with an
address at Bay City today on "Preven-
tion of Disease," and one on "Eugenics
or Race Betterment" tomorrow in the
same town. Prof. T. C. Trueblood, of
the oratorical department, will give a
recital on "Hamlet" on Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday at Eaton Rapids,
Fremont and Midland respectively.
Prof. W.D. Henderson will meet with
the Ottawa Teachers and Patrons' as-
sociation on Thursday at Nunica, and
speak on "The Will to Do." Prof.
David Friday will be in Detroit on
Thursday night to address the 20th
Century club on "Popular Educational
Fallacy." Prof. J. R. Brumm, of the
rhetoric department, completes this
week's program in Oscoda and Tawas
City with two lectures on "New Edu-
cational Ideas" and "Pilgrim's Script."
INSTALLING ORGAN SLOW WORK.
Some Trouble Experienced in Moving
Columbian Instrument.
Because of the difference in the
shapes of the organ lofts in University
Hall and the new Hill auditorium, the
installation of the big Columbian or-
gan is making slow progress. 'Ihe cu-
bic spaces are practically equal in
both places, but in the auditorium the
loft is narrower and longer than that
in the old hall. This necessitates a re-
arrangement of the swell boxes.
In order to obviate the faulty reso-
nance which was apparent in Univer-
sity Hall, the boxes are to be enclosed
in an extra casing, which will provide
a supplementary air-chamber. For
these reasons it will be several months
before pipes- can be adjusted.
The box for the echo organ in the
roof is practically completed. This is
situated on the east side of the
building, between the ceiling and the
roof proper, at a distance of 500 feet
from the key-board. The box is being
encased in asbestos and cement to
eliminate all possibility of the sound
being thrown out, except through the
regular conductor.
Railway Conductors to Visit in City.
An'inspection of the university will
be made by the 34th grand division
of the Order of Railroad Conductors
during the week of May 13. The or-
ganization will have its annual con-
vention in Detroit at that time, and
has set aside one day in order to visit
the different departments of the uni-
versity.

7-119 West Liberty St.

SENIOR FINISHES PLANS FOR
COSMOPOLITAN CLUBHOUSE
Idea of Erecting Local Building For
Foreigners Meet -, ,al
In All Quarters.
Plans for the clubhouse to be built
by the Corda-Fratres Cosmopolitan
club, to cater to the needs of foreign
students in Ann Arbor, have been com-
pleted by Victor Bonilla, '13E, of Co-
lumbia, S. A.
The living room will occupy the cen-
tral portion of the first floor. Entrance
to this will be gained by a front and
a side door. A dining-hall, to accom-
modate 150 persons, will be one fea-
ture of this floor. Other apartments
will be a reception room,a music room,
and an office for both the manager and
the secretary. The basement is to
contain a smoking room, two card
rooms, fencing and wrestling rooms,
lockers, and a large billiard room. The
kitchen will also be in the basement.
Personal letters have' been sent to
the people interested in the peace
movement, advocates of Cosmopolitan-
ism, and foreign alumni, asking for
contributions. The scheme is meeting
everywhere with the greatest approval,
and gives promise of receiving a fair
share of financial support.
A fund campaign committee will be
appointed immediately after the gen-
eral election, which is to take place on
April 1. Active work will begin among
the student body following spring va-
cation.
PLAN EXHIBITION OF WORK
FOR WEEK OF MAY FESTIVAL
Engineering Representatives Meet to
Make Arrangements For Joint
Demonstrations
Representatives from the civil, me-
chanical, architectural, chemical, elec-
trical, marine and forestry branches
of the engineering department met
Saturday afternoon to make prelimi-
nary plans for the exhibition of uni-
versity work which is to be given the
week of the May Festival concerts.
As not all the branches of the de-
partment have completed their organ-
izations, nothing definite could be de-
cided, and only general plans were
discussed. Each branch will have its
own committee, working under a gen-
eral committee. This sub-committee
will have immediate charge of the ex-
hibition of its own department.
Every senior engineer, and many
juniors, will be asked to serve on the
various sub-committees,as an immense
amount of work is necessary to get
things ready for the exhibit. So much
enthusiasm was shown at the meeting
Saturday, however, that there is no
doubt that the exhibition will be of
such magnitude and interest to sur-
prise every visitor. The literary de-
partment has not decided as yet,wheth-
er or not it will enter an exhibit.
The chemical engineers are plan-
ning to show a complete cement plant
in operation; the "civils" are to have
a modern power plant, from the
stream rushing down the mountain
side turning a water wheel, to the lat-
est designed generator; and the aero-
nautical men will display an areoplane
flying on air currents created by
an electric fan. The other depart-
ments promise equally interesting fea-
tures. '
HARVARD MEN DOMICILED IN
CAMBRIDGE GIVEN FRANCHISE.

MAJESTIC
EXTR A!
Today ONLY
Tomorrow
Matinees and Nights
At Every Show
Inauguration
Ceremonies
In Moving Pictures
Special Added Features in
Addition to Vaudeville
Coming M
THURSDAY fvolary Girl"
Cast of 20 people
Opening at Matinee
"VISIONS 'D ART" NEXT MONDAY

I

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Special Rexall Week, March 17 to 22
All over the United States, Canada, and England, six thousand
Rexall agents are united to promote the Rexall Policy of Better Goods,
Better Prices and Better Satisfied Customers.
Rexall truly signifies Highest Possible Quality at Lowest Possible
Prices.
Rexall Week will be specially observed with bargains in Rexall
Remedies, Stationery, Rubber Goods, and Candy.
The People Stop at
THE REXALL DKVG STOKE
E C. EDSILL. Propriae r n
122 So. FM&ain Sterset Pr-ecription. S;.oishli ato

STUDENTS

F - e..

There's a Reason Why
You Should

Eat at Painter's
RES TAU RANT

109 North University Ave,
112 W. Huron St.

p

Regular Meals 25
Commulation Tickets
Good in Both Places
If You Don't Get Enough
Say So

The Ann Arbor Press
OFFICIAL PRINTERS TO THE UNIVERSITY
AND
Printers of Student Publications

OLD

MAY FESTIVAL

See Us when you want something fine in dance
and Banquet Programs.

'IRTH LIN
SCHUrlANN-HEINK HILL AU
MURPHY
AMATOMay
GRISWOLD
' SCOTT I
STANLEY
STOCK
IVED THE CHORAL UNION
CHILDREN'S CHORUS
THOMAS ORCHESTRA
SALE REQUIEM
0-$2.50 LOHENGRIN
val Ticket may 6e MEISTERSINGER

UDITORIUM
14 15,
11, 1913

Press Building

Telephone 27

/

ON
.0

Pre-Festii

returned, otherwise $8.00-
$5.50.
$2.00 Sale begins Saturday,
March 22.
UNIVERISITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC

LAUS DEO
WALRUS AND
CARPENTER

U
U

tHIIot1 &R itoch

CatItors

ANNOUNCE THE
WOOLENS FOR

ARRIVAL
SPRING

OF THE NEW
AND SUMMER

MUSIC AND DRAMA.
Historical Recital Wednesday.
Albert Lockwood's postponed iistor.
ical recital will be given at 4:15
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in high
school hall. The program, devoted as
it is to the works of Franz Liszt, is
intended to deepen and extend the im-
pression of last year's recital, and to
show Liszt in the capacity of a sincere
musician. The recital is almost en-
tirely a new one, though two of the
works given last year are retained.
The program will be as follows:
Etude in D flat major.
Variations in a basso continuo of Bach
(1875).
Fantasia quasi Sonata d'apres une lec-
tufe de Dante (1837).
St. Francis' Sermon to the Birds.
Orage (from Annees de Pelerinage, 1st
Book, Switzerland).
Ave Maria (from Harmonies poetiques
et religieuses).
Fantasia and Fugue on the theme
B. A. C. H.
UNIVERSITY NOTICES.
Meeting of the Gargoyle business
staff today at 5:00 o'clock. Important
assignments will be made for April
issue.

FACULTY WILL TAKE PART IN
DELiEERATIONS.
(Continued from page 1.)
the latter will tell something about re-
volving vectors.
Prof. James B. Pollock will lecture
before the biological conference on
Thursday, April 3. His subject will
be "A Reconsideration of the High
School Course in Botany." Prof. David
Friday will lecture before the com-
mercial conference in room B-8 of the
high-school the same afternoon on"The
Growth of Commercial Education."
Physiographers to Convene.
The physiography conference, meet-
ing in the geological laboratory, will
hear two lectures by university pro-
fessors. "Physiography as Seen by an
Outsider" will be the subject of Prof.
C. 0. Davis' address, while Prof. Frank
Carney will talk on "Physiography:
Its Malady and a Suggested Remedy."
Librarian Theodore W. Koch will
repeat his illustrated lecture on "The
Physicial Side of the Book" before the
drawing conference in the Memorial
hall lecture room on Friday afternoon,
April 4. Prof. F. S. Breed will take
part in the conference of the educa-
tional psychologists in room B-1 of
the high school, on Thursday after-
noon, April 3. He will lecture on "The
Present Status and Future Prospects
of Experimental Pedagogy."
DEUTSCHER VEREIN TO HOLD
UNPRONOUNCEABLE FESTIVITY.
At a meeting of the men's section of
the Deutscher Verein, held last night,
April 18 was the date selected for a
"Gemuetlichkeitsfest," to be held in
Barbour gym. This party will be a
membership affair for all sections of
the Verein, and various features are
promised by the committee in charge.
A program, recitative and musical,
has been arranged for the next meet-
ing of the men's section, which will be
held Monday evening, April 21.

MARCH 26 th

AT THE

Admission

s 100

Thrilling Feature

5 Fort Street West

IN A

TEMPLE
Race in the Clouds

Pathe Film Entitled
"A DRAMA- IN
AIR"

DETROIT

K

Harvard students have the right of
franchise, if they make Cambridge
_their domicile. There is no clear de-
cision in regard to students' voting,
but as the matter now stands a stu-
dent may vote whether he is self-sup-
porting or not, or whether his parents
reside in a city or town other than
Cambridge.
A case undertaken for the Wilson
club, a Harvard society, establishes
this position. The right of franchise
for students now exists at Columbia,
Princeton, and Boston University, as
well as at other colleges.

McDonald's
[Hoppe's Former Storel
Liberty St.
Fresh Candies
"MACS" FAMOUS CRACKER JACK
Have You Tried Us ?
Ann. Arbor Dye Works
French Dry and Steam Cleaning
Bell 628 204 E. Washington St.
L. R. WAHL, Manager.

iCUSS COLONIAL CLERGY
AT MEETING OF EDUCATORS
ie Educational club held its month-
aeeting in Tappan hall last night.
f. Claude H. Van Tyne, of the his-
y department, was the principal

speaker of the evening, the subject of
his talk being "The Influence of the
Clergy in the American Revolution."
Arrangements were made for the an-
nual club banquet, which is to be held
early in April, when the Schoolmas-
ters' club is convened in Ann Arbor.

Does your suit need altering? Alter-
ations our specialty. C. I. Kidd, 1112
So. Univ., Phone 1530-J. tf

r'-
'~
--- '
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s
I _

Spring

I ats your Spring Hat will be right if it is chosen

ie)

. \\

here. Stiff hats in a variety of proportions for different heads and
faces. Soft hats in all the correct shapes and colorings. $2 and $3.
FRED W. GROSS, 123 E. Liberty

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