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March 23, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-23

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The,

MAIL $2.00

Michigan

Daily

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00

II, No. 122.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 1913.

PRICK IVE C

( ARTISTS

N 1913 SQUAD
SHOW BALANCE

o Records Downed by Michigan Team
in Affray With Cornell, But
Consistent Work Wins
First Honors.
REDIT FOR VICTORY GIVEN
TO TRAINER "STEVE" FARRELL
xpect to Convey Brilliant Group of
Point-Seducers East to
Intercollegiate.
Once more has the Michigan track
am demonstrated that the 1913 squad
about the best balanced aggregation
athletes the Wolverine university
s turned out in a great many years.
Ad once again has Trainer "Steve"
,rrell demonstrated that he can de-
er the goods.
Miichigan defeated Cornell 'decisive-
in the last indoor meet of the season.
chigan did not break any records,
t she took six firsts out of a possible
;ht, and scored fairly well in seconds
d thirds. And this is what counts
the cinder path game.
Recent Teams Lack Balance.
n other years Michigan has had
n who have broken records, and in
ars long since gone by Michigan has
I well balanced teams, but of late
teams have not been particularly
11 balanced. It has remained for
ainer "Steve" Farrell, making his
tial bow to Michigan supporters as

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Tuesday,
rain or snow.
Univ'ersity Observatory - Monday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 47.2; maximum
temperature 24 hours preceding, 64.8;
minimum 'temperature 24 hours pre-
ceding, 8.0; wind velocity 12 miles per
hour.
STUDENT SOLONS
CONVENE TONIGHT

Cheer Leading and Band Questions
Come Up For Debate at
Council Meeting.

To.

EXPECT RESULTS OF RIOT PROBE
Competitive cheer leader systems
and the Varsity band will be the chief
subjects for debate at the regular
meeting of the student council this
evening at 7:30 o'clock, in the orator-
ical rooms in the north wing of Uni-
versity hall.
At the meeting of the board of di-
rectors of the athletic association last
Tuesday, the petition of the council
regarding the matter of cheer leaders
was referred back for further consid-
eration. It is expected that at this
evening's session some definite dis-
position of the subject will be made
by the student solons.
The result of the investigation into
the Junior Hop fracas, undertaken by
the council, has not yet been made
public, and some announcement along
this line is anticipated, although it is
probable that this subject will not be
treated this evening.

[t was not the Cornell meet alone
at served to bring out this fact. The
racuse meet, and the Varsity meet
fore it, showed plainly and conclus-
ly that with practically the same
e of material at hand as composed
t season's Varsity squad, Farrell
s moulded the men into a first class
gregation. And now, with such a
11 balanced team in the field, atten-
n naturally turns to the outdoor
son and to the Eastern Intercollegi-
Won Third Last Year.
n the last several years Michigan
placed in the eastern classic. Last
r she came home with third place
her credit. And this was due large-
to the efforts of a few men. This
son with these same one or two
n to depend on, and in addition a
ich of real track men to back them
there seems to be no reason why
higan should not show even better.
Taff, undoubtedly among the best
lege quarter-milers today, Haim-
igh, equally as good in .the two-
e, and almost as good in the mile,
gent in the high jump, Kohler in
shot put and hammer throw and
ig in the hurdles, are all good for
nts. But there are other men who
likely to place this year, and who
y make it possible for Michigan to
second place in the eastern event,
even first.
Expect Several to Place.
mong these men are Baier, in the
,rter, Brown and Carver in the half,
rard, Lapsley and Bond in the
ints, and-well the entire Michigan.
ad could be named. Under Farrell
the men have been doing mighty
d work, and they are expected to
elop even more when once the team
s out-of-doors.
rith a well balanced squad already,
t a good two months in which to
n for the event, there seems no
son why Farrell should not take
best squad in years to the Eastern I
arcollegiate, May 30 and 31.
)F. SCOTT HEADS ASSOCIATION
higan Man Picked as President of
League of Northern Schools.
rof. F. N. Scott, of the rhetoric de-
tment, was elected president of the
th Central Association of Collegesl

MAY SEND FOUR FRESHIES TO
COMPETE IN PENNSY RELAYS
If Yearlings of Sufficient Fleetness
Can Be Uncovered, Trip Will
Be Undertaken.
Michigan may be represented at
the Pennsylvania relay races by a
quartet of freshmen quarter-milers for
the first time since the university has
sent teams to the relay classic on
Franklin field. Sanction for this de-
parture was given by the athletic
board of control at its meeting Sat-
urday.0
This year's freshmen class is strong-
er in 440 men than any class for many
years, but that it possesses four men
who can run the quarter in fast
enough time to make an impression
in the East has not been proved. C.
B. Smith is the one yearling who has
marked ip as good as 52 seconds und-
er the observation of Trainer Farrell,
and it is claimed by friends of Uffer
that he has also made the distance in
time as fast as this.
It will be up to the freshmen to
turn out two other men with ability
to come under the mark at some figure
close to 52 seconds, if the sanction of
the board of control is to be taken
advantage of possible candidates men-
tioned in connection with the remain-
ing two places are Lyttle, Shulkin,
Gore, H. Smith and Catlett.
SCANDAL-MONGERS REVEL IN
CARE-FREE FEST AT UNION.
Laying aside their busy pens, and
bidding dull care begone, members of
The Michigan Daily staff made merry
at their first annual dance at the
Michigan Union last night. During
the intermission a skit, featuring take-
offs on the members of the staff, was
presented by the "cubs."
The decorations, which caused fav-
orable comment at the B. V. D. funct-
tion, were utilized. A seven-piece or-
chestra furnished the music, and sev-
eral feature dances were given.
Members of the board of control and
their wives who were present as chap-
erones were Dean and Mrs. J. R. Effin-
ger, Prof. and Mrs. F. N. Scott, Prof.
and Mrs. W. G. Stoner, and Prof. and
Mrs. J. W. lover.
Soph Engineers to Dance Friday Night
Soph engineers will hold a dance at
the Packard academy Friday evening.
The admission will be $1.00
and the number of couples is limitedI

FACULTY WILL
TAKE PART IN
DELIBERATIONS
Sessions of Schoolmasters Here Nex
Month to Be Featured With
Addresses by Various
Professors.
HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS WILL
LISTEN TO ORIGINAL PAPERS
Separate Conferences to Be Formed
For Discussion of Many
Topics Named.
When the high school teachers o
the state assemble here next month
for the forty-eighth meeting of the
Schoolmasters' club,many of the mem-
bers of the university faculty will lec-
ture before the various conferences in-
to which the larger body is divided.
The classical conference meeting,
in the lecture room of Memorial hall
on the afternoon of April 2, will be
addressed by Pro. F. W. Kelsey. His
subject will be "Caesar B. G. VI. 26
Again." On the following afternoon,
Prof. J. G. Winter will read a report
to the conference dealing with "Greek
and Latin in the Schools of Belgium.'
Prof. W. W. Florer will also lecture on
"Luther's Use of the New Testament
in Latin before December 1552," and
Prof. Moritz Levi will address the con-
ference on "Some Thoughts About the
Value of Classics."
Will Discuss Religion. -
The classical conference will hold
its second meeting in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall on Friday afternoon, April
4. At this meeting Prof. Campbell
Bonner will lecture on "The Material
Bond Between God and the Worship-
per," and Dr. F. E. Robbins will tell
about an experiment he recently made
with the direct method of teachng.
The meeting will end with a descrip-
tion and various demonstrations in-
tended to inform teachers as to what
recent books and illustrative material
are of value to the classical teacher.
Profs. A. R. Crittenden and J. G. Win-
ter will lead the demonstrations, and
other members of the classical faculty
will take part.
The modern language conference
will also hear several lectures by in-
structors in the universtiy. At its first
meeting on Wednesday afternoon,
April 2, in University Hall, Prof. J. W.
Scholl, of the German department, will
tell about the success which Gottfried
Keller's Novellen met in the various
high schools, and Mr. W. A. McLaugh-
lin, of the French department, will lec-
ture on "M. Henri Bordeaux." At the
meeting of the conference in the high
school auditorium on Friday afternoon,
April 4, Prof J. R. Brumm will give a
lecture on "What College Freshmen
Know about English When they Arrive
on the Campus."
Historians Meet Thursday.
The history conference will meet in
room C-3 of the high school, on Thurs-
day afternoon,April 3. Prof. W.A.Fray-
er, of the history department, will tell
the purpose of the el1ementary history
courses in the university. The con-
ference will again meet in the same
room on the following afternoon, and
Prof. E. W. Dow will lecture on "The
Highway With History."
The first meeting of the conference
of physics and chemist'y, will be held
in the west lecture room of the physics
laboratory, on Thursday afternoon,
April 3. Prof. D. M. Lichty will tell
about the preparation and the various

properties of permanently liquid sul-
phur trioxide, and Prof. Karl E. Guthe
will give a lecture on "The Place of
the Electron Theory in Elementary
Teaching." At the second meeting of
the conference on the following after-
noon, Mr. W. W. Sleator will lecture
a "Volume and Pressure Changes in
a Typical Sound Wave."
Math Conference Friday.
The mathematical conference will
have but one meeting and that will be
feld on Friday, April 4, in Tappan hall.
Professors W. W. Beman and G. W.
?atterson will each give a lecture. The
'ormer will suggest a list of books for
he use of high school teachers, and
make various comments on them,while
(Continued on page 4.)

RETRACTION OF
mBDYCOTTRULE
IS NEXT. POiNT
Conference Will Probably Act Before
Matter of Return to Fold
Goes to Meeting of
Regents.
BOARD OF CONTROL PLEDGES
SELF TO ASK FOR ENTRANCE
Stone-Wall Would Be Encountered if
Regents Declined to Alter
Personnel of Body.

f Although an official interpretation
of the recent resolutions of the board
of control relating to Conference re-
turn has not been made, it is probable
- that the matter will be acted on by the
Conference before it reaches the board
of regents.
The resolution calling upon the
Conference to abolish the boycott rule
is iron-clad, and is made a contingen-
cy to the return resolution. In other
words, before the resolution to change
the board of control and return to the
fold becomes effective, the western or-
ganization must abolish the boycott
rule.
When this is done, the board of con-
trol here practically pledges itself to
petition the regents for a change in
its makeup,and to present a reques tfor
re-entrance. Hence the regents here
have really the final say on the matter,
and the Conference must act first be-
fore the matter reaches the university
fathers at all. .
Undc, these condit ons many inter-
esting situations are liable to arise, as
for instance if the Conference abolish-
es its boycott, and then the regents re-
fuse to change the board. Just what
would be the outcome of this would be
hard to prophesy.
COLLECT FUNDS FOR AID OF
LITERARY AND LAW STUDENTS

Faculty members all over the cam-
pus are interested in the proposed
adoption of the honor system in exam-
inations, and many are actively engag-
ed in backing the movement. Several
professors in the engineering, medical,
and literary departments have ex.
pressed much enthusiasm over the
plan, but, almost without exception,
they declare that an attempt to insti-
tute the honor system should originate
with the students, no matter how much
the faculty might desire it. Prof. C. O.
Davis, whose five classes in education
adopted the plan last semester, thinks
the proper way to get it accepted gen-
erally on the campus is to have the dif-
ferent classes and the student council
pass upon it.
Approies of Honor Idea.
When asked his opinion of the hon-
or system yesterday afternoon, Prof.
C. 'H. Cooley, of the economics depart-
ment, said, "The work in my classes
is of such a nature that I have never,
had occasion to be concerned about ex-
aminations, but I think it a progressive
plan. As a social psychologist, I hear-
tily approve of the principle of the
honor system, for I consider it a step
in the direction of self-government,
which certainly is highly desirable.
All that I have heard of it is favorabl'/,
especially at the Carnegie Institute in
Pittsburg, where, on my visit last year,
I was assured it was a pronounced
success."1
Prof. David Friday and Dr. Carl H.
Parry, of the economics department,
both-endorsed the system, saying, how-,
ever, that they had no experience with
it in practice. Concerning the scheme,
Dr. Parry made this qualification:
"There is no compromise between the
honor system and the police system.
If the honor system is to be made a
success,the instructor must make him-
self independent of the behavior of the
class, and put the students wholly up-
on their own responsibility. I shouldr
certainly like to see it tried out hereR
at Michigan."
Students Should Act First.
"The request for an honor system
should come from the students," de-
clared Prof. Henry E. Anderson, of the
mechanical engineering department,
last night. "No pledge should be asked1
from the student, neither should he

TO D E ONSTRATE X-RAY WORK
IN PUBLIC LECTURE TONIGHT.
A lecture and demonstration of
practical X-ray work will be given
by Dr. . T. Loeffler in the amphi-
theater of the dental_ building this
evening at 7:30 o'clock. The appara-
tus of the department will be used
to illustrate the makingof radiographs.
The lecture will be given under the
auspices of the senior dental society,
and all persons interested are invited
to attend.
HONOR PLAN HAS
MANYS ADVOCATES~

Faculty Members Indorse System For
Conducting Exams According,
to New Scheme.
FEW HAVE SEEN IT IN PRACTICE.

GENERAL SALE
LEAVES BLOCKt
OF GOOD SEA'
"Contrarie Mary" Tickets Meet Fa
Heavy Demand on First Day
of Distribution to
The Public.
MANY DESIRABLE SEATS FOR
1913 UNION OPERA REMAIN
Tenight's Rehearsal to Put Finis
Touches on Long-Heralded
Production.

Plenty of good seats are left fo
the Wednesday and Saturday night pr
sentations of"Contrarie Mary," the 19:
Michigan Union opera. The sale to th
general public opened yesterday, at
while there was considerable demaz
for tickets, it was not as heavy as e:
pected. The sale will continue ever
day this week at the Whitney theate
box office, between 10:00 and 5:(
-o'clock, and it seems likely that eac
performance will be played to a capac
ity house.
There are still some seats left fc
the Thursday night show, although:"
ranks next to the Friday night an
Saturday afternoon presentations i
popularity, these two houses bein
practically sold out at the advanc
sale to members.
A lengthy dress rehearsal was held
last night at the Whitney theater, and
Director Bert St. John was well pleas
ed with the way matters went. Ev
erything is practically ready for the
initial performance tomorrow evening
and tonight's rehearsal will serve
chiefly to put on a few of the finishing
touches.. The early practice and train
ing given the choruses has done much
to bring about a finished show for the
first night, and consequentlytthere wil
likely be little difference in the quality
of the various performances.
The books containing the music o
"Contrarie Mary" have arrived, and
will be placed on sale as usual, tomor-
row night. The first issue of posters
has already been sold, and about 200
more will be placed on sale today a
Wahr's.
All persons connected in any way
with "Contrarie Mary," and all active
members of Mimes, were the guests o:
the Mimes at a dinner at the Union
Sunday night. A program of shor
talks and several solos were given
and the opera songs were rendered by
the whole company.

The Wedemneyer scholarship fund,
which is being promoted by Frank C.
Cole, '05L, of Ann Arbor, has been in-
creased to $6500.
Recent contributions have come
from the Rev. P. T. Rowe, bishop of
Canada; Ex-Governor Chase S. Os-
borne; Senator Charles E. Townsend;
and State Treasurer Chas. W. Harrer.
The largest amounts so far have
been three $100 sums, given by Sena-
tor William Smith, Congressman Cop-
ley and R. W. Parker. When the con-
tributions have been collected, the
fupd will be devoted to loans for the
use of literary and law students. If
possible it will be made available at
the beginning of next year.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE TO WITNESS
TENNYSON'S "FALCON" FRIDAY.
Another production of the Dramatic
club will be offered at the Women's
League meeting Friday afternoon, in
Barbour gym,' at 4:00 o'clock, when
Tennyson's "Falcon" will be played.
The cast is composed of Alice Lloyd,
Julia Jinsberg, Catherin Reighard
and Clara Roe. Dancing will follow
the play.
TO GIVE LECTURE ON WATER
FILTRATION THIS AFTERNOON
"Water Filtration and Purification"
is the subject of a combined lecture to
be given by Mr. G. C. Clark, civil en-
gineer, and Mr. D. H. Goodivillie this
afternoon at 4:00 o'clock in room 348
of the engineering building. Mr. Good-
ivillie is superintendent of the Toledo
Water Works company. The lecture is
open to the public.
OFFICERS OF Y. X. C. A. PICKED
AT M1EETING LAST SATURDAY
At a meeting of the members of the
Y. M. C. A. Saturday evening, the fol-
lowing officers were elected: Presi-
dent of S. C. A., Ralph Snyder, '14L;
Y. M. C. A., president, Paul Blanshard,
'14; vice-president, T. Harvey Clark;
secretary, Paul V. Ramsdell, '16;treas-
urer, Oliver Enselman, '15.

be expected to spy upon anyone else.
"The idea of the professor putting
the plan up to the class is all wrong,
but instead there should be a volun-
tary agreement between the students,
a creation of a higher sense of honor.
Such a plan should have the aspect
purely of 'honor among gentlemen.' An
honor system must depend for its suc-
cess upon the existence of a strong
sentiment among all the tudents, and
the free development of such a senti-
ment should by all means be encour-
aged."
NEED OF SCIENCE BUILDING,
INVESTIGATED BY SENATORS
The finance committee of the state
senate, composed of 0.G. .Scott, '93L,
J. V. Rosenkrans, '95L, F. W. Walter,
'93L, V. A. Powell, '94L, and E. W.
Wigans, was in the city yesterday
viewing the university and investigat-
ing the need of a new science build-
ing.

EDISON COMPANY PURCHASES
PULMOTOR FOR USE IN CIT
To prevent fatalities among cano
ing enthusiasts, the Eastern Michig
Edison company has purchased
newly invented artificial respirati
machine, called a pulmotor, which w
be kept ready for public use. The m.
chine was recently demonstrated wi
great success before a group of ph
sicians and city officials by Dr. E.
Sherril, of Detroit.
The pulmotor, with the instrumen
necessary to adjust it, will be kept
the Williams street offices of the Ea
ern Michigan Edison Co. The but
ing will be open day and night, so tl
the instrument may be procured
any time.
Y. W. C. A. WILL HOLD ANNUAL
ELECTION THIS AFTERN00
Officers for the ensuing year will
elected at the Y. W. C. A. cmeeting
Newberry hall, this afternoon at 5:
o'clock. Before the election, Registi
A. G. Hall will give a short talk.
Open Sale of Women's Banquet Ticke
Tickets for the annual women'sba
quet will be on sale at the library fr(
10:00 o'clock until 11:00 o'clock, a
in University hall from 11:00 o'clo
until 12:00 o'clock, every morning th
week.
Dean Effinger Returns from Iowa Ti
Dean J. R. Effinger, of the litera
department, returned Sunday fro
Iowa City, Iowa, where he attended
conference of the deans of weste
state universities. The gathering w
informal in nature and was held to d
cuss the problems of college admin
tration.

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