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March 23, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

he

Michigan

Daily

F

LOCAL $1.50

M A1.

U

i_

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 1913.

PICA FI

D

VOTES

'BACK

TO

FOL

IS DECIDED

COSMOPOLITAN CLUBS GIVE
PROGRAM-AT UNION TODAY.

TO SPEAK AGAINST WESTERN
MEN IN HAMILTON CONTEST

REGENTS MUST PASS

Musical and Feature Stunts is
of Committee For Balance
of Year.

Plan I L. D.'

David, '14L, Represents Michigan
In Chicago Meet
April 4.

CLOSE VOTE: 6-5,

ON

9UESTION BEFORE

IN

HEATED

SESSION

Of Control Demands Big Nine First
abolish Boycott Rule And Accept
Majority, With Veto As
Faculty Control.
.L DECISION RESTS
ITH REGENTS & NINE,

This afternoon's weekly Union pro-
grain will be featured by an exhibition
of Japanese sword dancing by T. Meri-
matsu, '15L and K. Tonouchi, '13, ,with
a characteristic double-handed sword
bout between the latter, and T. Yama-
da, '13. The other numbers will be a
violin solo by Rafael Suarez, '16E, of
Porto Rico,' several Spanish songs by
S. Martinez, '13E, and a mandolin and
guitar duet by Willis Connelly, '15L,
and Theodore Wood, with George Bai-
ley, '16, playing the accompanists.
The Sunday afternoon programs for
the balance of the year will be devoted
to musical and feature stunts, for it
has been decided that the speaking at-
tractions will be-,too heavy for the
spring months. With this end in view
arrangements have been made for the
appearance of the Cosmopolitan and
Glee clubs.

L. D. David, '14L, will represent
Michigan in the Hamilton oratorical
contest at Chicago April 4, speaking
against representatives of Minnesota,
Illinois, Northwestern, Iowa, and Indi-
ana.
This year's contest marks the re-es-
tablishment of the Hamilton club
eventa, which were abandoned six
years ago because of the excessive ex-
pense connected with them., The ora-
tors will be entertained at the club,
and the winners will receive testimoni-
als of $100.00 and $50.00, as well as
membership in the club.
Either Prof. Trueblood or Hollis-
ter will accompany David torChicago.
His subject, with which he won the
universitycontest is "The Social Re-
former."
MAY FESTIVAL TICKETS ARE
ENJOYING A RECORD SALE.
Tickets for the May Festival are
having a rapid sale and from p.resent
indications there will be record break-]
ing crowds at the concerts. Seats int
block "C" will be placed on sale to-t
morrow at $4.50 each. Holders of pre-t
festival tickets may obtain seats in thist
block for $1.50.t

CONFERENCE CAN Al
Univesity "Fathers" H ave Absolute V<
Over Actions Of Athletic Board, And
Its Decision'Is Regarded As
Doubtful
DISPUTE LIKELY TO END
AT MEETING IN APR

'estern Confer- ing upon the conference to abolish its
or not Michi- boycott rule will have, is a matter of
conjecture. Thope who voted in favor
aber of the or- of this maintain that Michigan cannot
lped to found, afford to become a member of an or-
a controlling ganization which has such a policy.
a vote of six to Its opponent urged that the confer-
'ol of athletics ence will not consent to abolish this
assed a reso- rule, and it may stop the entire negoti-
rtiment of that ations. It is certain that this will
uld return;but pass the Michigan board of regents
two conditions and the determination of this question
concessions on will be entirely up to the conference.
ce, but require Will Cause Change in Athletic Policy.
rule against If the conference accepts the two
efore Michigan conditions that Michigan has placed
tatement; and upon it, then Michigan must make se-
ence accept as rious changes in its present athletic
with a numer- policies before it can finally enter.:
th a veto pow- The training table as presently consti-
Hutchins. tuted with the association paying some
ncessions that of the board must be abolished. The
r seven years freshman football team must go by the
end has come boards, and the board of control must
s expected. Of be changed. Certain other minor rules
settled finally must also be shifted. At this point
yet to pass comes in the concessions that the con-
the university, ference will make. Although the as-
itself. Wheth- surance is not official, it is believed
dies will pass that Michigan will be allowed a train-

; :

A glee club
charge of the
March 30.

will have complete
program for Sunday,

T. E. IL Black Will Lecture in Lansing
Mr. T.E.H. Black, of the oratory de-
partment, left last night for Lansing
to give a, lyceum lecture on "Supply
and Demand" this afternoon.

Now that the question of a return to
the conference has been passed upon
by the board in control, the next
stormy sea that the measure must pass
through, is the regents. The regents
have absolute veto power over what-
ever the board may do, and they are
the only authority over the actions of
the board. So in their hands will rest
the fate of the return, until it gets to
the conference proper. Just when it
will be passed upon is a matter of
much conjecture, and it is believed by
many who are in close touch with the
situation that it will not be until the
April session that the board will dis-
cuss it.
There is a meeting of the board of

DECISIVE VICTORY MARKS.
CLOSE OF INDOOR SEASONi

sole co
,ted afte
and the
han wa
is not
hands
ents oft
.ce body
hese bo
resoluti
it there
chigan t
ce than

on is a matter
is no denying
oday is closer
at any time

ing table if all the men pay,
cost of their board. This
(Continued on page

the entire
system is
3.)

g Lasted All Afternoon.
islon came after a meeting
. afternoon, and was passed
te, splitting the board five
Those who voted in favorof
ition were Profs. Holbrook,
?atterson; Messrs. Hunter
ard, and Director Bartelme.
opposed it were Prof. Whit
MIessrs. Duffy, Murfin, Cool-
MVatthews. The definition of
ntrol as laid down by the
still a question upon which
onference can pass as to its
he faculty will have a nu-
'orking majority on the
l a veto power will be vested
nt Hutchins, but this appar-
not take from the regents
ent supervising power, mak-
two vetoes hanging over
The motion to return, if the
would accept that kind of
wer,was made first and pass-
close vote. Close on the
his resolution came the one
a condition precedent be-
g any action under the re-
lution, that the conference
sh the obnoxious boycott
s passed by a vote of ten to

SETTLEMENT IS
IN SIGHT FOR
VARSITY BAND

'I
Big Red Team Is Sent
Defeat To T
4331-3
TONES SEI S I
In fitting climax to the season's work,
Michigan triumphed over Cornell in
the annual indoor track meet in Wat-
erman gymnasium last evening by a
score of 43 1-3 to 28 2-3. Six firsts out
of the total of eight events were won
by the Wolverines, and from the shot
put, which was won by Kohler in his
best heave of the year, to the mile,
taken in brilliant fashion by John Paul
Jones, Michigan held the lead. The
shattering of the gymnasium record
for the mile when Jones reeled off the
distance in 4:19 2-5, was the stellar
feature of the competition.
Predictions of a close score in the'
dual struggle were nullified by the fin-
al count, which expressed practically
the same ratio of point getting efficien-
cy as the meet of last season. A year
ago Michigan took the meet from Cor-
nell by the margin of 41 to 31, while
last evening the score favored the Wol-
verines a slight degree more.
Several firsts were won by Michi-

Down To Inglorious
dhe Tune Of
ro 28 2-3t
MILE RECORD,
gan in events which had been either
conceded to Cornell or listed as doubt-
ful. Chief among these was the half
mile in which Brown took the event
and Jansen scored third. To event
was practically conceded to the Itha-
cans, especially when Carver announc-
ed at the last minute that illness would
prevent him from taking part in the
race. Jones, however, did not partici-
pate in the 880, and Brown had little
trouble in defeating Speiden, who fin-
ished second.
In the 35 yard dash, which was liste&d
as doubtful by many Michigan sup-
porters, Seward and Lapsley came to
the fore in great shape, and easily de-
feated Whinery and Reller; the Cor-
nell cracks. Kohler had little trouble
in taking the shot put as Kanzler, the
best of the Ithacan weight heavers,
did not live up to his reputation.
Haff dispelled all doubts as to his
physical condition when he negotiated
(Continued on page 4.)

regents scheduled for Tuesday, but
there are two reasons why it is claim-
ed that the question will not come up
there. In the first place matters are
supposed to be in the president's hands
two weeks before the meeting in order
to be brought up, and this action will
have but two days. But even if this
technicality is waived, and the matter
could be rushed through, it is said that
only a bare majority of the regents
will be present Tuesday and the mat-
ter is one of such importance that it
will not be discussed until the whole

STFOR OPEiRA
ISLIGHT
Plenty of Desirable Locations
Still Available For Those
Unable to Receive
Pasteboards.

board is present. .So it is evident
unless almost unanimous predic
are wrong, it will not be until
next month before the university
ers listen to the request and deter
its fate.
It is by no means certain that
regents will act as the board and c
the way for the measure to reach
conference. It is known that som
the regents have expressed opi
against Michigan's return,and it w
not be surprising to to see them re
to change the makeup of the bo
and so stop the whole proceeding.
the other hand, the regents have r
exercised their power of veto over
board, but have generally accepted
decision of those who are in '
touch with the matter.
So whichever way one looks at
matter it is a tossup. It is highly p
able that when the matter is bro
up there both sides of the question
be presented to them and the w]
controversy will be fought over ag
No intimation has been officially g
out by any regent regarding how
stood on the question, and it is
likely that the campus will know
fate of the resolution until the ac
of the regents is announced.
"ALTITUDE HOP" SCORES BIG
HIT IN INITIAL APPEAR A
Prizes Given to Prettiest and Sho
Girls, Tallest Man, and
Best Waltzers.
Sponsored by a record-breaking
gregation of all-lit aeronauts, the
titude Hop" made its initial debut
Michigan social circles yesterday
ternoon at Barbour gym. The "
night Sons" were present and roa
for several dances through the lai
near-harmony, scoring a big hit.
Maude Mills, '14, was chosen.as
prettiest woman present, and was
sented with American roses.
Kohler, '14, was the tallest man,
carried home a pennant. Irene
Cormick, '14, was the shortest wo
present,and so received a box of a
C. G. Pendill, '13, and Viona Cole
'13, were presented with a two p
box of 'candy for winning the 1
waltz.
"Profs" Gargoyle Sets Mark For S
The "Prof's"number of the Garg
which went on sale yesterday m
ing,is setting a high-water mark fe
humor magazine in its large nu:
of sales. This seems to indicate
the inside dope on the faculty carr
wide interest to the average stud

Are

Athletic Board Grants $800 Yearly
It, Provided That the Board
of Regents Makes Gift
of $1,500.

to

CLUB WILL BE REORGANIZED
IF PROPOSITION CARRIES."
Thirty Men Will Have Small Annual'
Salaries, and Twenty Others
Will Also Play.
Besides settling the conference dis-
pute, the board in control yesterday
took up the band question, and voted
to give $800 to that organization on a
contingency. The matter was brought
up in a resolution of a committee of
the faculty senate appointed to investi-
gate the matter. This committee will
present a petition to the board of re-
(Continued on page 2.)

LITTLE LIKELIHOOD
MATINEE SAY

OF FRIDAY
MANAGERS.'

jj~res bgterian Church-

Sale For General Public Takes Place'
Between 10:00 and 5:00'
O'lock Daily.
Yesterday's seat sale for the opera
was not nearly so heavy as on Friday,
and when the sale for the general
public opens tomorrow at 10:00 o'clock
there will be plenty of good seats for
the Wednesday, Thursday, and Satur-
day night shows. The student sale
took most of the desirable seats at the
two favorite presentations on Friday,
night, and Saturday afternoon.
The sale to the public will continue
(Continued on page 2.)

March 23rd, 6:30 P. M.

C. E.

Passion Play, with

Lantern Slides.

resolution call-

-a -- -

..

Series

HUGH

BLACK

University

with

Hall

-1

"Religion and The Present Age"

7

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