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March 22, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-22

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I

ei

MAIL $2.00

ihigan

Daily

LOCAL $1.50

MAIL $2.00

i

, No. 121.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 1913.

PRIORUF VU

T -

IRD TO VOTE
CONFERENCE
IESTION TODAY

Athletic Authorities Expected to Go
on Record as Either Favoring
or Opposing Return to
Big Nine.
ACTION, TO BECOME FINAL,
MUST 60 BEFORE REGENTS.
Re-Entering Fold Would Probably
Mean Abolishment of All-Fresh
Football Team.
Probably by midnight tonight, or
sooner, Michigan's attitude as regards
the conference will be known for at
least another year. This afternoon the
board in control of athletics will meet
at what promises to be a lengthy ses-
sion and the main business will be a
discussion and final determination of
the Conference question.
It is known that the board has had
the matter under advisement and that
many different phases have
occupied its attention since last 'fall.
In all probability all these investiga-1
tions will be presented to the board
this afternoon and it will either vote
to petition for entrance into the west-
ern organization or will vote not to do
so for at least another year. Should
the board vote to return it will proba-
bly mean a modification of the training
table,the doing away with the freshman
football team, and the effecting of a
change in the present makeup of the
board.
If the board should decide to return
the matter is not definitely settled as
the regents stil have an opportunity to
veto it. They need not veto it in so
many words but by simply refusng
to allow a change in the board they
could nullify the effect of a vote to re-
turn..
Just'what the outcome will be is the
subject of much conjecture on the
campus. It is known that each side
has its constituents though those who
have openly advocated either step are
few and the majority of the board have
not definitely expressed themselves.
With the board composed of 11 mem-
bers, all of whom will be present to-
day, it will require six votes to ask
Jor Michigan's return and whether six
ballots will be cast that way is im-
'possible to figure out.
It is expected that other routine bus-
iness will come up but as a matter of
Interest the Conference question over-
shadows all the others.
B.V.D.'S HOLD ANNUAL DANCE
FEATURING A MOCK TRIAL.
Novelties par excellence were re-
vealed at the combined annual dance
of the Barristers, Vulcans and Druids,
at the Union last night. The honorary
societies eclipsed all previous records
for staging a novel and entertaining
hop. One of the principal features of
the evening was a mock trial by the
Barristers. Other surprises were a
ghost dance by some of the Vulcans,
and " a slice of life" from the Druid
ritual.
Music was furnished by the Wright
.'Saxophone Trio. The chaperones for
this evening were Dean Henry M. Bat-
es, Prof. Clarence T. Johnson, Prof.
David Friday, and Mrs. John R. Effin-
ger.
1lomeop Baseball Maiager Appointed,
J.C. King, '13H, was appointed man-
ager of the departmental baseball
team by Wm. Gramley, '13H, president
of the senior class.

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Rain and
snow.
University Obser atory-Friday,7 :00
P. in., temperature 252; maximum te-
perature 24 hours preceding 63.8; min-
imum temperature 24 hours preceding,
25.2; average wind velocity 21 miles
per hour; rainfall, 0.54 inches; wind
velocity 60 miles per hour.
LIT AERONAUTS TO FLY TODAY.
Many Features and Novelties Planned
For High Altitude Hop.
A record breaking attendance is
predicted for the all lit, "Altitude Hop"
to be given in Barbour gymnasium this
afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The pro-
gram, which will be of an aeronautic
nature, will be featured by warblings
from the "Midnight Sons" quartet of
the glee club, which created favorable
comment at the recent home concert.
Several prizes will be given for the
shortest and tallest man, the best look-
ing couple, etc., but the nature of the
prizes will not be disclosed until this
afternoon. Feature dances will abound
and with an eight piece orchestra the
dancers should have a merry time.
HONOR SYSTEM HAS
TRIAL WIT H MEDICS
Pres. Kennedy Says it Has Worked
Successfully With Senior Class;
"Loose" Scheme in Vogue.
PLAN TRIED FOR MANY YEARS
"The honor system in examinations
has worked splendidly with us," de-
clared President C. S. Kennedy of the
senior medics last night. "As a result,
there is no doubt as to the integrity of
any member of our class. I am not
sure as to just how the same, system
would work out with undergraduates,
but I do know that it has proved most
satisfactory to us."
The honor system has been used in
the medic dpartment for more than a
decade. The system requires a state-
ment from each student that he had
neither given nor received aid. It did
not require an actual pledge to report
any other student seen cheating. An
honor committee existed and the mat-
ter of reporting was a duty though
not. absolutely compulsory.
"This so called 'loose' system was in
vogue for six years. Two classes then
adopted a more rigid system requir-
ing a pledge of each student to report
any cheating.
Dr. Frederick M. Loomis, '12, presi-
dent of the class of that year, says re-
gardin.g the respective merits of 'rigid'
and 'loose' systems.
"In our first two years a 'loose' sys-
tem of taking examinations under the
honor system proved an absolute fail-
ure, s we instituted more rigorous
methods with the most gratifying re-
sults. Each student was pledged not
only neither to give nor to receive aid,
but to report to an honor committee
any 'cribbing' which came to his no-
tice.
"This scheme was followed for four
years with the most pronounced suc-
cess. I believe only one stuident was
forced to leave in all the time it was
in use. There was not a single com-
plaint against the plan, although one
man took his examinations separate-
ly."

Fresh Lits Will Hold Dance at Uinion-
Fresh lits are planning to give a
dance at the Union on April 18. A
three piece orchestra will furnish the
music and supper will be served at
10:00 o'clock. The chaperones will be
announced later.

HAVOC WORKED
ON CAMPUS BY.
TERR1FIf WIN[

Two Years of Research Work Rendered
Worthless by Breaking of
Concrete Test
Panels.
IWIND VELOCITY GREATER THAN
ANY REACHED FOR FIVE YEARS
Instruments at Observatory Register
Gusts as Hard as Sixty Miles
an Hour.
A gale approaching the velocity of
50 miles per hour raised havoc with
things in general yesterday, and de-
stroyed university poperty to the ex-
tent of more than $500. The universi-
ty library was the worst victim, while
two years of research was put to
naught by the upsetting of experiments
on the roof of the chemistry building.
The storm struck Ann Arbor at
about 9:00 o'clock yesterday morning
and the little instrument at the astro-
nomical observatory whirred up to the
50 mile mark, registering more than
60 in numerous gusts. This is the
greatest velocity in five years. The
barometer dropped to 28.2, a degree
below normal.
Skylights were shattered on almost
the entire south stack of the library.
They were replaced by a temporary
wooden roof which will probably be
replaced by permanent tile roof in-
stead of the skylight arrangement. The
skylights were for!nerly used for the
old art gallery in the library and were
not changed after the removal of the
pictures to the alumni Memorial build-
ing.
On the roof of the chemistry build-
ing 35 concrete test panels, being used
in an investigation by Prof. E. E. Ware
were upset and partly broken. The
slabs were being tested for efficiency
in resisting the weather and had been
exposed for about two years out of the
four required in the test. The experi-
ment was being conducted for the
Paint Fellowship and the result would
have been of considerable importance+
in the cement industry. Another test
will be started with greater precau-
tions against possible destruction by
the wind.I
Plate glass windows were broken in1
the north wing of University hall and;
in Waterman gym. A piece was ripped -
from the roof of the law building and+
windows were shattered in the dome of<
University hall. A large sheet of roof-
ing was torn off at the Beta Theta Pia
house, and a tree was blown over near
the power house. Small windows were
shattered in several campus buildings.1
On State street a delivery wagon
was overturned with a general confus-
ion of pies and groceries.l
Wireless to The Dally. +
The storm last night blew down part
of the wireless apparatus at Ohio
State, and the department here will
build new parts for the damaged plant.
Notre Dame station was also com-
municated with last night, and the Bay
City Tribune called The Michigan Dai-
ly. Conference and storm news was
given the up-state sheet in exchange
for a story on a railroad wreck.
Monday night the local wireless sta-
tion will continue the long distance
test with North Dakota university.

D

t f

OPERA TICKET
SALE BREAKS
ALL RECORDS
First Day's Advance Offering Results
in Over Half Seats Being
Taken Up; Which
Nets $3,500.
CARDS ALL DISPOSED OF
FOR FRIDAY NIGHT SHOW.
Matinee Selections Also Practically
Exhausted, But Three
Nights are Open.
All previous records were broken in
-"Contrarie Mary." The day's receipts
netted nearly $3,500, and considerably
more than one-half of theentire num-
ber of admission cards for the 1913
Michigan U[lion opera passed into the
hands of Union members as a result of
the first six hours' distribution.
Although the box office at the Whit-
ney theater did not open until 10:00
o'clock yesterday morning, activities
began long before that hour. A dozen
of the more ardent ticket-seekers as-
sembled in the lobby of the theater be-
fore the midnight preceding the sale,
and the early morning blasts of Good
Friday welcomed over a hundretmore
expectant students, squatted about the
Whitney building with eager eyes on
the court house clock.
When 10:00 o'clock arrived, the line
in front of the ticket window extended
for a block. Practically every man
in the front ranks was primed with
membership slips, and the first 50 stu-
dents to apply at the window depleted
the supply of pasteboards for the Fri-
day evening and Saturday afternoon
performances to a large extent.
The crowds poured past the box of-
fice all morning, and the afternoon
sale was almost as strenuous. At 5:00
o'clock, the closing time, practically
all the seats for the Friday night show
had been distributed, while the block
of admissions for the Saturday matinee
was almost as sadly thinned out. .
While most of the seats for the two
favorite presentations have been sold,
the dstribution of tickets for the other
three shows has been small. Good j
seats for the Wednesday, Thursday,
and Saturday evening performances
maly still be obtained, and inasmuch
as the long period of rehearsals is ex-
pected to make the show practically
as good on the first night, as at any
other staging, a heavy sale for the
first two presentations is anticipated
today.
To avoid an interference with the
current offering at -the Whitney, the
hours for today's sale have been
changed. Union members possessing
advance slips may secure tickets at the
theater box office between the hours
of 10:00 and 12:00 o'clock this morn-
ing, while the afternoon dstribution
will contnue from 3:00 to 5:00 o'clock.
All of the seats remaining after the
completion of the preliminary requi-
sitions will go on sale to the general
public Monday morning at 10:00
o'qlock.The sale will continue through-
out the week, between the hours of
10:00 and 5:00 o'clock every day, with
the regular box office hours preceding
each performance.

*:

* * * * * * * * *

PLAY: TIE GALLANT.
0---
Chivalrous knights of old were
relegated to back seats during
yesterday's gale when a dozen
engineers dropped drawing-
boards, T-squares and triangles
and took their station at the en-
gineering arch to assist harass-
ed co-eds and others of the frail
sex through the "cave of the
winds."
The extraordinary utilization
of brawn began when an engi-
neer who had safely weathered
the gale through the arch heard
a shrill shriek and turned around
to behold a mass of petticoats
and frills being swept backward
by the wind.
The boilermaker gathered up
his courage and seizing the dis-
tresseddamsel by the arm guid-
ed her through the arch.. There
were plenty of other young la-
dies in the same fix and several
students soon found themselves
occupied.

* *

OLANS-HARD IS

Loving Cup Presented to Dr. MeCotter.
Dr. R. E. McCotter, an anatomy in-
structor, was presented with a loving
cup by the 1916 medic class yesterday.
Dr. McCotter left yesterday for Law-
rence, Mich., to enter general practice.
ELECT 15 TO PHI.
LAMBDA UPSILON

Active and
Into

Associate Members Taken
Honorary Chemical
Fraternity.

HEAR TALK FROM DR. FISHER.
Fourteen active members and one
associate were elected to Phi Lambda
Upsilon, honorary Chemical society,
last night.
The new active members are, J. C.
Bogue, '14E; W. H. Collar, '13; C. D.
Hocker, graduate student; W. A. Hoyt,
'10; C. C. Kennedy, '14E; N. B. Law-
rence, 313P; L. J. Paddock, '13E; R.
A. Price, '14E; Carl Pfeifer, '14E; C.
H. Rogers, '13P; C. S. Schoepfie, '14E;
S. D. Shinkle, graduate student; W. R.
Webb, engineer special; T. H. Wick-
anden, graduate student. J. S. Laird
Ph.D., was elected associate member.
Dr. H. L. Fisher, of New York, na-'
tional secretary of the association, was
the guest of the local chapter, and
spoke at the meeting last night.
A national -convention of the 12
chapters of the society will be held in
Milwaukee, March 24-26. The Michi-
gan chapter will be represented by Dr.
F. E. Bartell, Mr. R..K. McAlpine, and
Mr. L. C. Johnson.
FIFTY WOMEN CHANGE COLOR
AT EASTER ENTERTAINMENT.
Women to the number of 50 came to
Barbour gym yesterday afternoon with
eggs in their coat pockets, eggs done
up in handkerchiefs, and some few ev-
en used their sewing bags to carry the
Easter emblems for the party.
The collection of seven dozen minia-
ture snowballs was put in a caldron of
boiling water for a five minute bath.
Before the 84 white spheroids had been
removed from the boiling broth sever-
al fingers were burned, but not badly
enough to prevent anyone from taking
part in the dance which was held on
the gym floor as soon as the eggs were
put on the cooling trays.
After the dance the women returned
to the kitchen to mix the dyes, and
when the frolic ended the eggs had
been transformed from those of com-
mon or barnyard hen, to that sort
which is peculiar to the festive Easter
rabbit. The colored eggs will be sent
to the university hospital Sunday for
the shut-in children!

VICTORIOUS AT
PEACE CONTEST
Is Awarded Testimonial of $75.00 and
Will Represent State
at Inter-State
Contest.
WINNER FOLLOWS BROTHER'S
PATTERN WHO WON LAST YEAR
Albion Gets Second Place, and X. A.
C. Orator Honorable
Mention.
Paul B. Blanshard, '14, won the
state peace contest at Ypsilanti- last
night, the Old's testiniknial of $75, and
the honor of representing the state
of Michigan in the inter-state contest.
Blanshard's brother won the Uni-
versity Oratorical contest Thursday
and the national peace contest last
year. Blanshard's subject last night
was "The Evolution of Patriotism."
M. R. Reed, of Albion, took, second
honors last night and was awarded
the Moores testimonial of $50;' and
A. I. Margolis, of M. A. C., was given
honorable mention.
A delegation of Michigan and Albion
students were present at the contest,
The other schools represented in the
contest were Olivet, Hillsdale and the
State Normal.
FORCE GRADUATE STUDENTS
TO LEAVE FOR POOR WORK.
For First Time In History of School
Advanced Pupils Are
Dism ssed.
Owing to poor work a number of stu-
dents were requested yesterday by the
executive council of the graduate de-
partment to sever their connections
with the department at the end of the
present semester. This is the first
time in the history of the graduate
school that this action has been deem-
ed necessary.
The standards of graduate work
were raised at the beginning of the
present semester when the new grad'
uate departmnt was installed Accord-
ing to the requirements, a student
should not only pass the required
number of hours, but should show ex-
ceptional proficiency.
FINED FOR MUTILATING BOOK.
Student Arrested on Complaint of
High School Head.
Edwin E. Shauer, '16, of Marquette,
pleaded guilty in Justice Doty's court
on Thursday to a charge of mutilating
a book belonging to the high school
library and paid a fine of $15.00 and
costs, amounting to $18.70 in all, in
preference to serving a jail sentence
not exceeding 30 days.
Principal D. W. Springer of the
high school made the complaint, which
was based on the tearing out of sever-
al pages from a volume of Stevenson's
works.
Women's Literary Soelety Will Meet.
At the meeting of Omega Phi at the
Gamma Phi Beta house this afternoon
at 1:00 o'clock, papers Will be read by
Florence Swinton, '13, Florence Hax-
ton '15,. Alice 'Wiard, '15, and Helen
Brandebury, '14.
Manufacturing Optician Gives Talk.
Mr. H. E. Howe of the Bosch and
Lomb Optical Co., of Rochester, N. Y.,
delivered a lecture on "Methods of

Manufacturing and Testing Scientific
Apparatus' yesterday afternoon in the
chemistry building.

FOR ALL LITS

Today, 2:30

Barbour Gyram

350

r

1T II

'

Ceneral Seat
Sale--Opens

Contrari4a

New

ary

Whitney
Box

Monday
10 A.M.

SEAT

SALE

FOR

UNION

MEMBERS

Office

Last Chance Today

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